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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


London, Thursday, June 16, 1994 


A Cloud Over Europe: 
‘Inflation Psychosis’ 


Threat to Young Recovery Prompts 

A United Effort’ to Calm Investors 


Before Sanctions, a Grace Period 

U.S. Plan Puts Off 
Tougher Measures 


By Alan Friedman 

International Her aid Tribune 


PARIS — Europe’s leading economic 
policymakers have become alarmed that 
soaring long-term interest rates may soon 
thre at en the Continent's budding recovery. 
As a result, they have begun a campaign to 
talk financial markets out of inflation fears 
that have been driving up rates. 

In a series of unusually explicit remarks, 
officials have taken aim at what one analyst 
called the “inflation psychosis.” This is the 
fear among bond investors that economic 
recovery will bring with it renewed inflation 
- on both sides of the Atlantic. Because infla- 
tion erodes the value of bonds, the prices of 
government securities have been de clinin g, 
c a u sin g a corresponding leap in interest 
rates. 

Political leaders are more than usually 
concerned at. the potentially damaging im- 
. .pact of high interest rates because the eco- 
nomic recovery, although gathering pace in 
Germany, remains a slow one in most other 
countries, and much of Europe is still faring 
record unemployment. 

The rates are so high and markets so 
nervous that such politicians as Henning 
Christopbersen. the European Union’s eco- 
nomics commissioner, Gflmher Rexrodt, 
the German economics minister, and Ken- 
neth Clarke, Britain's chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, have all sought in recent days to 
play down inflation fears. 

The Europeans have been flanked by 
Lloyd Bentsen, the U.S. Treasury secretary, 
who came to Paris the other day and pro- 
claimed that “inflation is not a threat.” 

On- Tuesday, Hans Tietmeyer, the 
' Rimdashanlr president, who is Europe's 
most powerful central banker, went so far as 
to inffisi that excessive money supply growth 
in Germany was “no cause” for inflation 
codoths. • 

A U^S: Treasury official called the rhetori- 
cal campaign “a unified effort to calm skit- 
tish markets.” 

. But- market participants, taking a longer 
vies^remainbtjgely unconvinced. Although 
-xnasy. economists say that for once the poli- 
ticians azieright —that inflation should not 
- .heggm t iiue wor ry at present — the stage is 
r^ aq ^ Wga ^a e t fer**at could become-a- 
. r.lWlferOf UflfveSr'-' . 

vMrvhich governiratswill be able to fond . 


public spending that contributes to huge 
budget deficits, the risks of corooraie invest. 


budget deficits, the risks of corporate invest- 
ment being discouraged by the cost of long- 
term money and, ultimately, the pace of 
recovery itself. 

The reason all the rhetoric has failed to 
calm investors, according to David Hale, an 
economist at Kemper Financial Services in 


is that politicians are accurately 
describing the lack of an inflation threat at 
this moment, while markets are looking 
ahead. 6 

“Inflation," said Mr. Hale, “is all pro- 
spective, in (he eyes of the beholder. But the 


politicians are a lagging indicator at best. 
They are talking about inflation in June 
1994, but the financial markets are focused 
on the state of the economy in 1995 and 
1996.” 

In fact, as Mr. Hale and other economists 
note, much of Europe is at the end of a 
deflationary period, with the inflation rate 
still expected to fall during 1994. 

The latest projections from the Organiza- 
tion for Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment confirm that inflation is heading 
downward. 


By R. Jeffrey Smith 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clin ton administra- 
tion on Wednesday proposed giving North Ko- 
na a 30-day grace penod to settle its dispute 
with international nuclear inspectors before the 
country would be punished for its intransigence 
by mild United Nations sanctions. 

The draft proposal would give North Korea 
time to allow adequate inspections of its sus- 
pect nuclear program before facing a largely 
symbolic cutoff of UN economic aid and an 
embargo of its foreign arms sales. 

The measure is meant to respond to North 
Korea's defiance of International Atomic Ener- 
gy Agency inspection demands, the American 
officials said. A vote by the United Nations 
Security Council is not expected for several 
weeks. 

Although the draft proposal would put ofi 
for now a series of tougher sanctions endorsed 
by so me State Department officials and in de- 
pendent experts, it still appeared likely to raise 
tensions in East Asia because North Korea has 
warned that any UN sanctions would be re- 
garded as a declaration of war. 

The goal of deferring any economic sanctions 
that could seriously affect the North Korean 
economy is to avoid a military con/ ron ration by 
giving the hard-line Communist state a final 
chan ce to meet the atomic agency’s inspection 
requirements, officials said, h is also meant to 


The OECD says German inflation, which 
was 3.9 percent in 1993, should drop to IB 
percent this year and 2 percent in 1995. 

The European Commission said the aver- 
age inflation rate among its 12 member 
nations would fall from 33 percent in 1994 
to 2.9 percent next year. 

On Wednesday, the prices of European 
government bonds declined for the third 
straight day, with French and Ger man lO- 
y ear paper trading at yields of 730 percent 
and 7.07 percent, respectively. The yield on 
the U.S. 30-year Treasury bond rose to 7.41 
percent Only British government bonds re- 
sisted as yields fell after the latest statistics 
confirmed that wage inflation had increased 
less than expected. 

investors is that Germany’s money supply 
growth, which is expanding much faster 
than targeted, wiO combine with a stronger 
than expected recovery to generate inflation 
two years from now. 

The markets also worry that the French 
government of Prime Minister Edouard Bal- 
ia dur will be tempted by the looming presi- 
ier.fial elections next year to relax fiscal 
discipline and allow budgetary targets to be 


attract the support of China and Japan, which 
have argued for moving cautiously toward any 


have argued for moving cautiously toward any 
tough sanctions, they said. 

The tougher measures, which officials in the 
Defense Department and Japanese government 
argued were loo provocative to impose in the 
first phase of any UN sanctions, could include 
a freeze of North Korean assets in foreign 
countries, an embargo on oQ sales to North 
Korea and a ban on transfers of foreign curren- 
cy to the counuy or its citizens. 

The administration's draft UN resolution 
calls for these measures to be imposed only if 
North Korea rakes unspecified new steps that 
threaten international security, officials said. 
These North Korean steps could include eject- 
ing all remaining atomic agency inspectors, 
withdrawing from a global accord banning nu- 
clear-weapons development and producing 
more plutonium for nuclear weapons, the offi- 
cials said. 


The matter would have to be decided by a 
second UN Security Council vote. 


See INFLATION, Page 5 


The chieT U.S. delegate to the United Na- 
tions. Madeleine K. .Albright, began formal 
consultations on the U S. proposal with repre- 
sentatives of the other four permanent raeni- 



See SANCTIONS, Page 5 


Yurt 3j I !■ rang The oo-iial Fitvi 

Fortner President Jimmy Carter on Wednesday as he left Panmunjom, the truce village 
at the border between the Koreas. for talks with government officials in Pyongyang: 


Signaling Milder Line , China Resumes Hong Kong Talks With U.K. 


■ r . Compt/ii] bv Our Staff From Dispatches 

; HONG JCONG — Britain and China will hold long- 
delayedT talks neat week on Hong Kong's transition to 
Chinese rule, reinforcing signs that Beijing has set aside its 
quaoel^ilh Britain over democracy in the colony. 

An of ficial announcement Wednesday said the Joint Liai- 
son Group, which oversees the mechanics of the 1997 
Chinese takeover, would meet in Hong Kong June 21 to 23. 
v --,-jAJlhbqgh the group is supposed to meet at least three 
times* year, it has not convened since December, when talks 
deadlocked in acrimony over Governor Chris Patten's plans 
for reforming the colony’s election system. 

Tbc aanooncemcnt coincided with remarks attributed to 
sernar. Qdnesc officials suggesting that Beijing wanted to 
move beyond the dispute with Mr. Patten and get on with 


the nuts and bolls of readying Hong Kong for Chinese rule. 

Hong Kong public figures visiting Beijing quoted the 
Chinese foreign minister, Qian Qicben. as saying the dispute 
over political reform that has bedeviled relations with Brit- 
ain for the past 20 months had “been passed.” 

Newspapers quoted Cheng Yiu-tong. a leader of the Hong 
Kong Federation of Trade Unions, as saying Mr. Qian told 
the group that “die problematic situation in the past needs 
to be corrected and improved.” 

Another senior Chinrae official Lu Ping, was quoted as 


idling the writers that Beijing was eager to reach agreement 
with Britain on financing the colony's new $203 billion 


airport. 

First si gns of a thaw surfaced Monday, when the two sides 
announced they had made progress in their seven-year 


negotiations on ihe disposal of bases being vacated by the 
Bn tish Army. 

The developments this week do not mean iha; having long 
accused Mr. Palien of violating the agreements ceding Hong 
Kong, China has suddenly decided to accept his reforms. 

It has made clear that the reforms. v> htch model Hong 
Kong's election system more cloveK on Britain's, will be 
annulled when China rakes over. 

Its new strategy appears to be to sideline Mr. Patten's, 
design by ignoring it. and to cultivate Hons Kong's support 
by demonstrating that it has the colony’s economic well- 
being at heart. 

One test of that resolve is the airport no® under construc- 
tion, which is vita! for Hong Kong's future as an .Asian 
financial hub. 


Talks on financing the airport have been stalled over 
Britain's rejection of Chinese demands that it inject more 
cash into the mammoth project rather than saddle Beijing 
with debts after 1997. 


Mr. Lu. the Chinese official in charge erf Hong Kong, was 
quoted by the Eastern Express newspaper as saying the 
differences on financing “are narrowing.” and indicating 
China would be flexible. 


Another measure of China's desire for a smooth 
is the sudden progress made on the army bases. St 


is tne sudden progress made on ine army oases, x 

39 sites lie on prime real estate needed for Hcmg 


urban development, while others are to be adapted kVuhe 
post- 1997 Chinese garrison. V*' 

MR Reuters) 


HIS. Is Said to SgeForee 


Kiosk 


A| Only Solution in Haiti 


.0 A.M. .-.ick 
t Cob- Simpson divoy 


I. ; - Kenneth Freed 

i .^■and Doyle McManus 

■ .- ~ Los A ngeles Tma Set-rice 

\ PQRS-Atl-PRINCE, Haiti — Most Clinton 
rtdopn&antiori officials have concluded that 
jnew owromac sanctions imposed against Haiti 
‘^nptwte^ and.thai rally military imerven- 
[tioa-riaBL drive Haiti’s pliers from power, ae- 
diplomats here and officials in 

V BUfamris in Porfcan-Prinee said they ex- 
Ipoctad^rerident Bill Clinton, to give the sanc- 
4idii&&rfTiKHe weeks,- and then, at the end 
jofftfe ^-decade on qtifitery intervention. 


nation experts believed that the sanctioosl 
could not succeed. But a few still believe, the \ 


cornu nui uui «. — .j^ry Tr, 

economic measures could prompt the Haitian 
military to give up power peacefully, he added. 

“I don’t think anybody says they wfll as- 
suredly work,” he said, referring to sanctions. 
“A few say they might — and a lot say they 
can’t.” 


■STO OMB&Dd. one diplomat saia. iuc uuuu 
•fiiacfci^^ibe decision ’s timing, be added, was 
establish awide enough window for CHnion. 
' »rinritbe>sancti ons had enough time to work 
^faded^: .... 


_ — .juuuauea?;- - ... . „ . . 

* - J .iBFWashingtori, a senior American official 

i'.vS*r '- ■- - .’involved m Haiti policy said that most admim s- 


The official said the a dminis tration would 
keep i mpos ing sanctions — including a ban on 
comm ercial air flights and a freeze on interna- 
tional financial transfers announced last week 
— for two reasons: on the off-chance that they 
might work, but also to persuade Congress and 
other countries that the administration had 
tried every possible nonmilitary option before 
turning to die use of force. 

Asked when the administration realized that 
the newest sanctions would not succeed in over- 
throwing the regime, a diplomat in Port-au- 
Prince said: “There was never any donbL Ev- 
eryone knew from the beginning it wouldn’t 
wort” 


( ting . Mr. Sbspa/ 

•A • involvement/ 

\ so- Ms. Sit/ ■■ ; ‘^'7^ 

\v ' •• * ra * slashed,- ’ T- - 

'. woundy ' V - 

Y u * rd fierce 1 

ip- vestif ~ \ 

\ •; y-- "y ' 

v. - 7^, 


Macedonia Sounds 


Alarm Over Serbs 




SKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) — A senior 
government official charged Wednesday that 
the Serbian-led Yugoslavia Army was digging 
trenches and building up its presence inside 
Macedonia. 

Interior Minister Ljubomir Frckovski also 
confirmed that Macedonia was increasing its 
forces along the border, in an ominous sign 
that the Yugoslav conflict may spread south- 
ward. 

Muslims fight each other. Page 5. 


Weekend Destinations 



Starting today and continuing through the 
summer, the Trib will provide the weather 
outlook for selected resort destinations 
around the world. The forecasts will appear 
on Thursdays and Fridays. (Page lSi 


TOURNAMENT DAY MINUS ONE — Workers tethering a giant soccer 
a Chicago hotel near Soldier Field, where the World Cup opens Friday. 


bail atop 
Page 17. 


Bridge 

Crossword 


Page &■ 
Page & 




L-.3,79CUT 


Down 

0 . 22 % 

11SL39. 


The Other, Overlooked D-Day 50 Years Ago: Saipan 




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^ William Branigin 

Washington Post Service 

MARTI POINT, Northern Marianas — As the Japanese 
woman scrambled along die edge a£ what came to be known as 
Banzai Cliff here on the island of Saipan, she turned to glance 
at American Marines calling to her. 

Film shot by a combat cameraman that day in July 1944 
caugh t a lnnk of tenor on her face just before she jumped to her 
'death. 

Private First Class Guy Gabaldon. a highly decorated Ma- 
rine who learned to speak Japanese while growing up in East 
Los Angdes, rcmembera pleading with her not to throw her 
baby to the jagged rocks below before she jumped. But like 
tfftpigaiwfa of other Japanese civilians and soldiers who leaped 
from eKffs , blew themselves up with grenades or made suicidal 
diaigsson Saipan and neighboring Tinian, the woman chose 
father rfum capture by the Americans. 

- This and other terrible scenes followed the U.S. landing on 
Saipan on June 15, 1 944. For two Marine divisions commanded 


by Lieutenant General Holland M. (Howlin' Mad) Smith — 
the spearhead of an invasion force that event tully totaled 
71,000 men — ii was D-Day in the Pjcific war against Jjpjii. 

Like the more-famous landing on the beaches of Normandy 
50 years ago. the invasion of Saipan, code-named Operation 
Forager, marked a critical point in World War Ii and wa> ihe 
scale of some of Lhe war’s bloodiest combat. It cau<ed the 
resignation of Japan's military commander and prime minister. 
General Hideki Tqjo; allowed land-based U.S. bombers to 
devastate the Japanese homeland, and helped cripple the coun- 
try's shipping. 

**Saipan has the same importance as Nomiundv ." -.ml a.miu- 
el McKieires. a historian here, “ft gave the A mcri^ns j 
foothold within bombing range of Tokvo and led to the 
eventual end of the war a year later." 

But unlike this month’s commemoration of the Allied inva- 
sion of Normandy, ceremonies marking the 50th anniversary or 
the Pacific D-Day are going ahead with little fanfare. 

The highest-ranking American official scheduled i-> .mend 


the dedication of the S3 million American Memorial Park were 
the air force and navy commanders on nearby Guam. About 
150 U.S. veterans and 52 Japanese, including 1 1 veterans, were 
to attend commemorations at the park. 

For many of Saipan's native Chamorro and Carolinian 
inhabitants, ihe low-key nature of the anniversary celebration 


No. 34.616 


Full Relations 
Are Possible, 
Carter Tells 
North Korea 


may be just as well. Although the island is U-S. territory and 
has received more than 5250 million from Washington since 


has received more than 5250 million from Washington since 
1986. its economy depends heavily on Japanese tourism and 
investment. 


Some Saipanese are cool to the idea of glorifying the viciors 
of a battle of outsiders that caused so much death and destruc- 
tion. About 700 islanders — nearly a fifth of the native 
population at the time — died during the invasion and its 
aftermath. 


"The natives who died here were innocent victims," said 
Ramon Villagomez. 45, a justice on the commonwealth's Su- 

See SAIPAN, Page 5 


But Ex-President links 
Offer to ‘Transparency’ 
On Nuclear Program 


Cmptlcd by Oi r Staff From Dispatches 
SEOUL — Former President Jimmy Carter, 
trying to ease a tense international standoff 
with North Korea, offered the North Koreans 


friendship, trade and full diplomatic relations 
Wednesday if they would open up their suspect 


Wednesday if they would open up their suspect 
nuclear program to prove that it is not produc- 


mgatonne weapons. 

The framer American president, whose mis- 
sion to North Korea is described by the U.S. 
government as private, outlined his proposal 
formula at a banquet in Pyongyang raid in his 
honor by Foreign Minister Kim Yong Nam. 

The trip was an unusual exercise in diploma- 
cy. The United States has no diplomatic rela- 
tions with North Korea, yet Mr. Carter was 
being oven the full treatment in Pyongyang, 
where he was scheduled to confer with Kim A 


Sung, the country’s reclusive dictator. 

North Korea even opened itself to the Ameri- 
can television network CNN, which was al- 
lowed to broadcast the banquet proceedings. 

“We’re straggling now for dear understand-' 
ing about the full transparency of the mid ear 
program,” Mr. Carter said at the banquet. “I 
believe that as soon as this issue is resolved 
clearly and the misunderstandings are re- 
moved, then we can make progress toward the 
other goals we share.” 

“The time has come to establish full friend- 
ship and understanding, open trade, exchange 
of visits and full diplomatic relations between 
our two countries,” be added. 

Foreign Minister Kim said, “We believe that 
if the United States renounces its conduct of 
confrontation with us, respects our national 
sovereignty and treats our country on an equal 
footing, the nudear issue will be solved satisfac- 
torily. 

Mr. Carter, his wife, Rpsalynn, several staff- 
ers from the former president’s Atlanta-based 
peace foundation and a State Department in- 
terpreter crossed into North Korea from South 
Korea shortly before noon at the border trace 
village of Panmunjom. They readied the North 
Korean capital after a two-hour ride in a 16-car 
motorcade. 

The official position of the CHnion adminis- 
tration is 1 that Mr. Carter is carrying no message 
from the U.S. government and that he was 
briefed by the State Department only as a 
courtesy before be left for Korea. 

Bui South Korea’s state tdevision, KBS, re- 
ported that Mr. Carter was carrying an “unoffi- 
dal package deal” from Washington that offers 
diplomatic recognition by the United Stales if 
North Korea allows open inspections of its 
nudear operations to verify that nudear arms 
are not being produced. 

North Korea’s refusal to permit inspections 
has resulted in a standoff, with the United 
Slates pushing for sanctions in the United Na- 
tions Security Council, and Pyongyang warning 
that it would view sanctions as an act of war. 

President Bill Clinton said in Washington on 
Wednesday that he hoped Mr. Carter's mission 
would bring the situation into dearer focus. 

Cities throughout South Korea, meanwhile, 
held brief, low-key civil defense drills, a com- 
mon mid-June exercise. In contrast to Western 
press reports that had predicted a major mili- 
taiy mobilization, the drill seemed to be simple, 
almost casual 

Air raid sirens rang out at 2 P.M. In Seoul, 
traffic was stopped, and some pedestrians 
beaded into the subways that also serve as 
bomb shelters. 

At Riverside Park in Seoul on the north 


tank of the Han River, people kept on fishing, 
picnicking and throwing frisbees during the 10- 


See KOREA. Page 5 


Race to Replace 
Delors at EU 


Now Up in Air 


By Tom Bueride 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The race to succeed Jacques 
Delors as president of the European Commis- 
sion is hitting fever pitch a week ahead of the 
summit meeting of European Union leaders, 
with signs growing that the contest is more 
open than ever. 

The result is a mad scramble for support and 
trade-offs before the 12 EU leaders gather in 
Corfu, Greece, on June 24, and a growing risk 
dial the leaders will fail to decide Europe's 
most-powerful unelecied position. • 

“This is really becoming a high-wire act.” a 
senior official said. 

A stalemate at Corfu would be a big embar- 
rassment for the Union. The commission presi- 
dency is the only major item rat the agenda. 

Jean- Luc Dehaene, the Belgian prime minis- 
ter, who appeared to have the job clinched after 
winning the backing of France and Germany, is 
losing support because of resen mien tin Europe 
of Frencb-Gennan domination and a deter- 
mined push by Ruud Lubbers, the Dutch prime 
minister, European officials say. 

The increasing chance of a Lubbers-Dehaene 
deadlock has lifted the prospects of the long- 
shots: the EU trade chief, Sr Leon Brillan. and 
Peter Sutherland, the director-general of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

Their candidacies were also aided by a per- 
sonal endorsement from Foreign Minister An- 
tonio Martino of Italy this week and signs that 
Rome under Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi 
will no longer be content to merely follow the 


See EUROPE, Page 5 






? ft S-S ^ *5 jg j-p. 





■i* 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


Arafat Dawdles as the Reality of Self-Rule Sets In 


By Caryie Murphy 

W*ahinf;tm Past Service 

TUNIS — Office computers and files are 
packed. The lab equipment and books at Al 
Qods School are crated. And Palestinians 
have created a booming market in second- 
hand furniture as they shed what will not fit 
into the crowded homes or relatives, back 
home in Gaza and Jericho. 

The only thing missing is a departure date. 
"We are packing," said a Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization official "But still nobody 
knows anything. We are waiting for the 
chairman to decide when to return." 

More than a month after the Gaza Strip 
and the West Bank town oF Jericho came 
under limited Palestinian self-rule. Yasser 
Arafat, the PLO chairman, has tarried in this 
Mediterranean capital, refusing to begin the 
most significant — and surely most difficult 
— journey of his political career. 

Mr. Arafat. 64, now faces his biggest test: 
Will he be able to create jobs, and can he 
fashion an administration for the people 
whom he has claimed to represent for more 
than three decades? 

Bui instead of rushing lo Jericho, seat of 
the newly autonomous Palestinian govern- 
ment, Mr. Arafat is taking his time, embar- 


rassing even some of his most stalwart allies. 

“The beginning is not so encouraging” a 
PLO loyalist said. “Our performance or style 
is not good. One month has passed now . and 
the work is dragging slowly. Our relatives in 
Gaza are calling every day and asking 
“When are you coming? 1 ” 

Mr. Arafat justified his delay by demand- 
ing that the international community first 
make good on promises of financial aid. 

The lactic apparently worked. Lost Friday 
in Paris, the United States, the European 
Union. Japan and wealthy Arab states — 
which have pledged $15 billion for the new 
Palestinian Authority over the next five years 
— agreed to provide $42 million for the first 
ihrce months of its operation. 

But longtime observers of the Palestinian 
leader say there are other reasons for his 
procrastination. 

Chief among these, they suggest is Mr. 
Arafat's reluctance to deal with the political- 
ly damaging sometimes humiliating, aspects 
of the self-rule agreement he signed May 4 in 
Cairo with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of 
Israel. 

Mr. Arafat has sold the agreement to his 
people as the first step to an independent 
Palestinian state. But for now. the Palestin- 
ian leader is on a very short leash. Israel 


controls external borders and foreign policy 
and imposed scores of other economic and 
political limitations on the PLO-run govern- 
ment. For example, it retains a veto oyer 
individuals joining the Palestinian police 
force and required chat Mr. Arafat call him- 


must begin negotiating the next stage in 
Palestinian self-rule with the Israelis, includ- 
ing the organization of elections and rede- 
ployment of Israeli troops in the rest of the 
West Bank. But no one expects the next 
round of talks to be anv easier than the 


self "chairman" of the new 24-membcr Pal- tortuous-one that produced the May 4 pact, 
estinian Authority, rather than “president of especially since the volatile issue of security 


Palestine/' 


for Jewish settlements in the West Bank will 


"Arafat thinks that whatever agreement he be on the table, 
has accepted he would be able to change the Once home, the PLO leader will also be 

negative aspects when he is there/' said Su- confronted with significant political opposi- 
Iriman Najjak a critic who nevertheless non. After the massacre of at least 29 Pales- 
maintains lies with the chairman. Mr. Najjab tinians by a Jewish gunman at a Hebron 

said he did not think Mr. Arafat could make mosque in February, young Palestinians 
changes, “because the agreement is very burned Mr. Arafat in effigy 1 . Many others. 


dear in tying the hands of Arafal^and in 
defining the ceiling of his authority." 


x>liticized by the six-year uprising against 
sradi rule, are contemptuous of his govern- 


“He lied too much to market this agree- ing style, 
menl." said a PLO criuc. who also retains his Mr. Arafat is well known for refusing to 
lies with the organization and is paid by it. delegate responsibility and for jetting 
“He knows he* s lying, but unfortunately his around the world at crucial decision-making 
people believed tins lying. times. 

“After some months, people will discover “W c think Arafat must behave in a new 
this symbol is not like they believe. They did way, a democratic way," said Samir Ghoshe, 
not know him like we did. They will discover a sometime critic who has accepted the post 
what he promised is not true. It's not inde- 0 f labor minister in the new government, 
pendence, and the Israelis are not leaving." “Now we are talking about the future. Arafat 
Another concern for Mr. Arafat is that he cannot control by the same way and style.” 


Vatican Panel Urges 
Limits on Families 

Church Minimizes Report 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — As the Vatican pur- 
sues a strident campaign against 
what it sees as feminist' proposals 
on birth control due at a major 
population conference, one of its 
own panels has urged limits on 
Jamily... sizes, to avert “insoluble, 
problems” caused by runaway pop- 
ulation growth. 

The report by lay scientists from 
the Pontifical Academy of Sciences 
even wem so far as to say that 
families should have no more than 
two children per couple, a remark- 
able assertion from an institution 
sponsored by the Vatican, the arch- 
crusader against abortion and arti- 
ficial birth control. 

Moreover, the study not only 
contradicted the Vatican's official 
line, which disputes the idea of a 
broad consensus on the urgency of 
population problems, but also 
seemed to undermine the Roman 
Catholic Church's authority in ad- 
vance of ihe population conference 
in Cairo in September. 

“There is a need lo contain births 
in order to avoid creating insoluble 
problems which could arise if we 
were to renounce our responsibil- 
ities to future generations," the 
study said. 

Longer life spans and advanced 
medical care, it went on. “have 
made it unthinkable to sustain in- 
definitely a birth rate that notably 
exceeds the level of two children 
per couple — in other words, the 
requirement to guarantee the fu- 
ture of humanity.” 

The report did not go into specif- 
ic family-planning techniques — 
the Vatican permits only the 
“rhythm method” of sexual "absti- 
nence during ovulation — but it 
said there was an “unavoidable 
need to contain births globally.” 

The study, which reportedly in- 
furiated Pope John Paul 11, emerged 
as the Vatican prepared to notch up 
its campaign against proposals to 
be discussed at the Cairo gathering, 
which, the Roman Catholic hierar- 
. cby fears, will legitimize abortion 
and free access by adolescents to 
contraceptives. 

On Tuesday, 1 14 of the church’s 
139 cardinal^ the Pope’s most se- 
nior advisers, unanimously en- 
dorsed an appeal by John Cardinal 
O'Connor of New York against 
what he called “cultural imperial- 
ism" at the Cairo conference, lead- 
ing to “abortion on demand, sexual 
promiscuity and distorted notions 
of the family." 


DEATH NOTICE 

OBTrt'ARY 

JANET GERINGEK WOnrrZ. EDJ3. 

Jm .1 I'rOrtnp.f WmHU. F«: i: . r^v-W .r-'. i: 
her h'HiK* ji the jkv *< (*■■■•*-. in '!»■ 
of her fa-rilv anti A **-■ In.n-.S >«)■■-? f * 
ifttl 3 Iiirr>{ G'lr fpb - urlh. JW Ih.r Ijn.lHTjr 
hrwilb. AJiill ( tiUrvri ■)/ ,ti< oiK-ii. r ■ % ,-.n 
intcmanV'rul y-ci'rlki '-n. me stikvi- 

Lvrts and junta jk ^rr.igsW,* Wmuh r. 
Srff'Sil^oWiiO Syr^Jninh" HtiuliL! !■ -n r '•r.Cul! 
Saf. Ode i!n em Ari/w. and / tr. i?/ 1 '* 

/tanuflnc 

She wj< I he fminJe: an>J .ivi-km ■>: •«<.■ 
Tntniulr !'nr flnurv.-lir.t: K Tmm.-.c i" Ti-.i 
C iWwcil 'lew J.-f '-, Sh-; frwjuvnih jy-.i/ 
onrl^hnp,. aid ■ -i:-- ,rl - 


The church’s argument is that 
population growth is only one of a 
series of phenomena that can be 
tackled through sustainable eco- 
nomic development, health care 
and education, and should not be 
taken out or this context as an ob- 
ject of alarm. 

- Draft -proposals for the Cairo 
conference. Vatican officials argue, 
minimize such crucial issues as eco- 
nomic development and the rela- 
tionship between food supplies and 
populadon growth. 

And. the Vatican argues, the pro- 
posals devote disproportionate at- 
tention to birth-control measures 
that have ban promoted by Amer- 
ican feminists, the Clinton admin- 
istration and many population ex- 
perts as ways of enhancing the 
status of women. 

“The Holy See would have 
stressed much more that popula- 
tion policy depends on the level of 
basic primary health care and pri- 
mary education that you give wom- 
en. not focusing on family planning 
and safe abortions," said a senior 
Vatican official. 

Moreover, the official said, a 
range of "social and economic rea- 
sons" underlay population growth 
rates, which, “in general, are going 
down.” 

That was not the view of eight 
lay experts from the Pontifical 
Academy of Sciences, a group or 
more than 80 scientists drawn from 
varying religions and nationalities. 
Their report, which took two years 
to compile, was made public by the 
Italian Bishops’ Conference. 

The Vatican immediately dis- 
tanced ilsdf from the report 



After Socialist Defeat, Rocard Offers g® menF ^^| 

To Dxop Run for French Presidency p ress€s f or Talks 




By Will iiVm D rozd i ak 

H'a\huigio/i'Jit.i Service 


“Whoever wants to and has 
something to propose can be a can- 


had concluded that new leadership 
was necessary. “There was unanim- 


R eiders 

ADEN. Yemen — Yemen’s rival 


PARIS — Accepting the lion's didate/' he said. “No one can claim 
share of the blame for taking his to have a hold on the position." 
party toils worst electoral defeat in Polls show that Mr. Rocard 
three decades, the French Socialist would be easily defeated in ibe 
Party leader. Michel Rocard. of- presidential election by the two 
fered Wednesday to stand aside as leading conservative comenders, 
a candidate in next year’s race to Prime Minister Edouard Balladur 
succeed President Francois Miner- and the Gaullisi leader. Jacques 


ity about ihe need to raise the ques- beU Miar fire Wednesday in 

lion of an alternative candidate to 10 uneasy luD in fighung around 
Michel Rocard/' he said. “The southern stronghold of Aden, 
name of Delors was frequently pul “d a United Nations envoy was 
forward “ due back in the north for further 

.Mr. Deior- has vowed to concern 6iiks °° 3 possible cease-fire, 
irate on finishing hlsjob in Brussels Northern forces have made 

and refuses to present himself as a steady progress' r : -ound 


rand. 

Mr. Rocard’s declared wilbng- 


Chirac. 

Younger Socialists, stuck with a 


ness to jettison a political career 63-year-oid leader who looks une- 
spanning four decades unless he leciabje, have been looking for a!- 
rkeives a fresh vote of confidence lemative candidates who might 
followed elections Sunday to the stitch together a new majority. 
European Parliament, which gave Jacques Delors has been touted 
the Socialists onlv I4_5 percent of as a possible savior when he fiaish- 
the vole. « his 10-year stint as president of 

The disastrous showing bv what die European Commission at the 


for many years was Western Eu- 
rope’s most influential leftist pzrty 


end of the year. But Mr. Delors. 68. 
is seen bv many French voters os a 


forward " due back in the noun lor tur 

.Mr. Deior- has vowed to concen- 6iiks °° 3 possible cease-fire, 
irate on finishing hlsjob in Brussels Northern forces have m 

and refuses to present himself as a steady progress/ r : *»> 

direct challenge to Mr. Record. Adeninacampi 1 

“Nobody can accuse me of ob- era leaden who di j 

striding the Socialist Party's natu- May 21 after four\ 
re; candidate in any way." he said between (be fornL 
this week. south and conservativ> j 

Mr. Mitterrand has consistently cause of disputes over p 
sought to undermine Mr. Record's ing. j 

candidacy, believing that he lacks [o a UN spoken* . 
noth a moaera vision and the pol.t- ^ UN ^ LaBEr Bri. 
ical sophistication to lead France ^ due ^ northern capital 


Vatican 
And Israel 
Establish 
Full Ties 


By Qyde Haberman 

Ne* York Tima Servin' 
JERUSALEM — FulTtlling a 
commitment made six months 
when they officially recognized 
each other, Israel and the Vatican 
established fofl diplomatic rela- 
tions on Wednesday. 

The creation of formal lies, an- 
nounced at the same time in Jerusa- 
lem and the Vatican, sdll leaves a 
good deal of unfinished business, 
notably the legal and financial sta- 
tus of the Roman Catholic Church 
in Israel Two commissions were 
formed to handle those matters, 
and officials here said they expect- 
ed talks to take two years. 

In addition, the two sides must 
exchange ambassadors, who are al- 
most certain to be the officials who 
have served as “special representa- 
tives” in recent wrecks: Archbishop 
Andrea Cordero Lanza de Monte- 
zemeio for the Vatican and Shinuel 
Hadas Tor Israel 
Following the example set by all 
countries except Costa Rica and El 
Salvador, the Holy See will not put 
its embassy in Jerusalem. Instead, 
it settled on Jaffa, a former Arab 
town on the Mediterranean that is 
now home to Arabs and Jews and is 
administratively part of Td Aviv. 

On both sides, there was keen 
awareness that they had accom- 
plished far more than the routine 
business of diplomacy. 

ed not only one 
another but also their long, painful 
history, filled with episodes of ha- 
tred and persecution — from the 
15th-century expulsion of the Jews 


WORLD BRIEFS 


NATO Seeks Talks on 

their troubled relations Up. following a dispute wi 


over European security issues. ^knhlv would accept 

A senior Russian diplomat said tiiai Mini * 11 ? 10 

the invitation and could send top officials from the r = 

NATO headquarters within the next few days. 5 jzning 

Alliance diplomats said NATO, eager to end Ru«wn ^eia ^ , 

the Partnership for Peace plan for closer military f®- ll? the 

message to Moscow. NATO foreign «* <"jtc tar Russia 

wider relationship a t a meeting in Istanbul last ^“!^“f 1 V^: l , n . n iaiting 
would not be given any. kind of .Velq oVer NATO s d . u [ on 

process. At a Sheeting With former Soviet Hoc i&K Llf 

Friday, NATO and Russia plunged into a dispute abwt ‘ nlf0 j. 
European security, indudiag future NATO expansion and a 

Nigeria jimta’s Foe Vows to Surface 

LMJOS (AFP) —Moshood O. K. Abiola. tire malthnr 
who declared hiinsdfpreadem of Nigeria, will make a publn. a PP*. ■ _ 
this. week, in defiance of .the junta that is :bunting him. an cpP* 
spokesman said Wednesday. .• ... „ 

Ayo Opadokim, secretary of the National Democrauc Coahuon. 
backs Mr. Abiola’s daim to power, said Mr; Abida-would come ou 
hiding and that “It will bea public event, a which tire press, indudmg mt 
inte rnational media, wfll be in attendance.” . . 

Ml Abiola, who is believed to have comfortably won a presidential 
election a year ago that was annulled by the military, evaded ■ pm ,L 
sunounding his Lagos residence, went into hiding and dedared himset 
“president and commander in chief of the aimed forces of Nigeria- n 
junta has charged him with treason. 


Light and Sound Shawm Quebec 

MONTREAL (AP) — Scientists speculated Wednesday that a 
meteorite was responsible for hundreds of-reports across of a 

streaking tail of fire across the night sky, followed by a sonic boom. 

“Based on all the eyewitness reports, which are very consistent the 
most plausible hypothesis is that it was a rock that entered our 
atmosphere,” Pierre Lacombe, astronomist and director of the 
Montreal P lanetarium, said Wednesday. Mr. Lacombe said the rock 
was probably not larger than a soccer ball but was traveling at 50 to 


60 kubmeters pek second (30 to 35 miles per second) when h entered 

the atmosphere. Friction caused it to heat up mto4he.fireball that 
many reported seemig. 


f rom Catholic S pain to lhe_Nazi . 


Holocaust of the 1940s. 

Attempts to heal the wounds be- 
gan in 1965, when the Second Vati- 
can Cm mriT issued a document re- 
pudiating the idea of collective 
Jewish guilt for the death of Jesus. 
That event was a “revolution,” said 
Rabbi David Rosen, a member of 
the Israeli commission that negoti- 
ated with tire Vatican. 

Until there was a real normal- 
ization with the state of Israel 
there was always a question mark 
over bow genuine and complete 
that revolution really was,” hesakL 

Israel is central to the identity of 
Jews everywhere. Rabbi Rosen 
said, adding that diplomatic rela- 
tions with the Holy See would af- 
fect both how Jews are viewed by 
Catholics and how Jews perceive 
themselves to be viewed. 

The anno uncement was deplored 
by a radical Palestinian group in 
-Syria, the Democratic Front fra tire - 
Liberation of Palestine. - - 


26 Held in Murder of French Deputy 


MARSEILLE (AFP) — French police detained 26 suspected members 
of the Riviera underwork! Wednesday in connection with the murder of a 
conservative member, of Parliament and anti-corroption crusader. 

Ajudge later ordered tire release of the two. prime suspects, in jail since 
March, saying there, was not enough evidence to keep holding than but 
that they stiO faced charges in the case. 

The police said the swoop targeted suspected associates of these two 
men, Epifanio Pericolo and Denis Labadie. Urey are accused of carrying 
out tireFeb. 25 murder of fire legislator,. Yann PiaLShewas found slain in 
her car. The police said the suspects detained Wednesday included 
delinquents and restaurant and bar ownbrs from Toolon ana Hyeres. 

Canada Raises Fee on U.S. Fishermen 

TORONTO (WP) — Canada, imposed a stiff new fee Wednesday oh 
American fishing vessels passing through its west-coast waterways in an 
attempt to reduce what it said was overfishing of Canadian salmon. 

The move imposes a fee of L50Q Canadian dollars, or about SI. 100. on 
each American fishing boat moving through Canadian interior ocean 
passages. Washington and Oregon fishermen often pass to the. east of 
Vancouver Island and through similar, smaller channels as. they head 
north to fish off of Alaska. 


Dy a ratncai roicsuiuan . lL , — .. . ■ r; 

Liberation of Palestine. •; TRAVEL UPDATE • 

But' Deputy Foreign Minister * . /' “ . . . -•••-.■ -"L* : . ? 

cTs Vatican negotktiOTs'over the Dutch Rail System Resumiag Service 

last year and a halt suggested that AMSTERDAM (Reuters) — The Dutch railroad system slowly re- 
tire rautual-rKognition a ^co turned to life Wednesday as^ unions called emmembas to endjithraday 

signed 30 had pro strike over job cuts. But it was unclear whether all members would heed 

“much less enuasm m the Arab 


“much less" criticism in the Arab 
world than had been expected. 

“There were many skeptics who 
said that it would be very difficult, 
maybe even impossible, to have full 
diplomatic relations with the Vati- 
can as long as we do not have 
comprehensive peace in the Middle 
East," Mr. Bohn said. 

Israel had insisted on nothing 
short of full relations, even though 
the Holy See had wanted less, be 
said. So for the Israelis on Wednes- 
day marked an important mile- 
stone in the diplomatic acceptance 
they have craved and have broadly 
received in the last few years. 


thecaD. ■■ .... ’/ 

Netherlands Rail said most domestic services were beginning to 
resume operation, and trains ret for international destinations were likely 
to start running. 

Hundreds of traffic and poOntion control officers hit the streets of 
Athens on Wednesday ready to slap heavy fines on aB typeaof vehicles as 
part of a new governmen t effort to control smog. Cars illegally parked in 
260 key locations around the city center will be fined 25,000 drachmas 
($ 100), double the normal rate . (AP) 

CMna Northwest Ahfines has grounded its fleet of Soviet-made Tupo- 
lev planes for safety checks after 160 people died inlast week's crash of a 
TU-154, an airline spokesman said Wednesday. - ' ■ (AFP) 

Afl Nippon Airways applied Wednesday to begin a twice-weekly flights 
between Osaka and Qingdao in September, the first scheduled interna- 
tional rervice to the northeastern Chinese city. (AFP) 


Russia to Be Ruthless on Gangsters 

lJ . By Fred Hiatt ^Tfrom. ..iriaid be supported the decree. The mayor of Moscow, 

r r Wcahmgum Pou Service v. l , ^U/uri M. Luzhkov, also welcomed the measure, saying 


has provoked on upnxir in the So- c °kl technocrat wish lit Ue political 
cialist ranks as its members strug- experience, 
gle to find a new message, and Nonetheless. Mr. Delors's stand- 

perhaps a new leader, that could ing with French voter* surpasses 
guide them to power once Mr. Mil- that of Mr. Rocard. who has beer, 
t errand ends his second seven-year unable to translate his popularity 


lerm as president next year. 


as prime minister inio solid bade- 


mto tne .1st century, his ossoaates more Presideni Ali Ab. 5 The measure allows the police and counterintdU- 

sav. A dcre Muiercand ally, former „| lah galeh. •• Gugcncc officials to detain suspects for up to 30 days 

Cu.: jre Muuiter JatA Lang, has , __ fW .Hcwiibout judicial authorization. It also permits the tax 

bon tempied to challenge Mr. Ro- Thc^ are police and other authorities to examine confidential 

card but eves the president is said on \financial records and search business enterprises and 

to demerate his statesmanship po- gent nortbero and southero views * utOTnobiIes> apparently without warrants. It calls for 


has been quietly stoking the potici- Brahinri has reported progress in 
cal fortunes of Bernard Tapie, the trying to broker a truce. 


1 ^ By Fred Hiatt , «iaid be supported the decree. The mayor of Moscow, 

Z Zr WmhmgtoH Pou Smke -i ^Vuri M. Luzhkov, also welcomed the measure, saying 

X .v MOSCOW — PresWent Boris N. Yeltsin has afkfc*it would “go a long way toward controlling crime in 
cprovtd an urgent anti-crime measure that suspends this country.” 

some Russia's new dvil liberties, and tire nation’s But other faction leaders in the State Duma con- 
coimterpidkgeace chief said Wednesday that the demned the decree as a .violation of Russia’s new 
plan might lead to certain “excesses” by law-enforce- constitution, of existing law and of international hu- 
men t authorities..' ■ man rights norms. 

— The decree, signed Tuesday and published Wednes- Boris Zolotyukhin, a liberal and an author of the 

— day in tire daily izvestia, met with strong opposition constitution endorsed by Mr. Yeltsin and approved by 

^ffrora almost everyTaction in the legislature. voters in December, called the decree “a threat to 


AiS the party's directors met ing for a presidential run. Polls in- 
(ju/'ii. ! Wednesday lo consider the conse- dicate Mr Deiors would ran ever. 


flamboyant soccer rycocm who 
hopes to ede a populist wave. 


Eun^r ir.i 5 1 'rad I 

jamt Wr*iit 7 b fwvivwl K hci ihicv j 

David. U'J and Daniel hiT ;ijhJ' InMicn . 
pctuxca and Mti.’lrjti Tjul>. jiwJ h«.f l.reSin«.' | 

cuaipanp 1 ^ lfc.TTu:d 


uenccs of ihe vote and examine against Mr. Chirac but would pn.-b- 
heir bleak future. Mr. Rocard an- ably lose to Mr. Balladur. 


The San’a government said it 
was willing to discuss reconvening 


certain cities with high crime rates to be placed under 
regimes “of special controL" 

The head of the Federal Counterintelligence Ser- 
vice, the former KGB, said that certain “excesses” 


But other faction leaders in the State Duma con- 
demned, the decree as a violation of Russia's new 
constitution, of existing law and of international hu- 
man rights norms. 

Boris Zolotyukhin, a liberal and an author of the 
constitution endorsed by Mr. Yeltsin and approved by 
voters in December, called the decree “a threat to 
civilized legahprocednres.” The leader of the Commu- 
nist Party, Gennadi Zyuganov, said the measures 
"grossly violate current laws” and deprived the legisla- 
ture of its proper role. 

The lead article in the Thursday edition of Izvestia 
also warned that the decree, while likely to prove 
politically popular, might lead to “arbitrary rale” by 
Russia’s “repressive structures, which, oddly enough, 
are called law-enforcement structures.” 

Accustomed to Jbw crime rates -and little media 


nounced that he would no longer 
lay claim to being the natural can- 
didate of the Socialists. 


A former foreign minister. Ro- 
iand Dumas, a Mitterrand ioxaii*'- 
iaid a group of old guard Social; j:s 


Mr. i apie is rapidly emerging as a prewar military commission that 
a charismatic vote-setter, especial- j minded tram of five officers each 
ly among young people and poor from Jordan and Oman, plus the 
worker* who are disgusted with the military an»difet of the United 
political establishment. States and France. 


ir-Tass that such excesses would be few and that rapes and othercrimes in the last two.years. In the first 
only extraordinary measures could cope with “a real five months of this year, the number of murders in 
war of criminal mafia dans” now raging in Russia: Moscow increased by 41 percent compared with ihe 
The ultranatianaBst leader Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky same period last year, a Moscow police official said. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


Page 3 


THE AMERICAS / JAPAHES 


.^Ur, 

*■* 


- fro*- 


■ - • 1 


Welcome 


A Proper , Mostly Majestic, U.S. 

Precision and Impeccable Maimers for Emperor and Empress 


By Catherine S. Manegold 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — They 
emerge from their limousine buffed 

J J ■ 


^UlMUMW* VU VOJJJU09 WHIT. 

Pleasantries are exchanged. 
Months of planning and mountains 
of expose vanish m a mo men L 
Their majesties move on. 

It is not easy being imperial. As 
Emperor Akita to and Empress Mi- 
cfciko and their party travels from 

a to eary in a private Boeing 747- 
an identical plane follows be- 
hind, in case of breakdowns. As 
many as 17 limousines snake 
through city streets. 

But they are not immune to trou- 
bles. The 1 3- ton armor-plated Cad- 
illac that nKt tbe couple in Atlanta 
had a flat tine — one of its super- 
steel- belted radials that are sup- 
posed to be tough enough to with- 
stand bullet shocks. The tire was 
^ch an g e d, and the party went on its 
way. 

Buses trail behind, carrying a ret- 
inue of more than so that includes 
the imperial hairdresser, several 
gentlemen and ladies in waiting 
and their assistants, the grand stew- 
ard, the grand master of ceremo- 
nies, the emperor’s doctor and oth- 
er- subalterns who handle matters 
from where to go to what to wear. 
*. *— every detail is 


the United States, trying 10 put 
friendship and communion over 
competition and mistrust, the cul- 
tural divide has mostly been ob- 
scured by good manners, a huge 
amount of planning and an innate 
American awe in the presence of 
royalty. But the divide is always 
lurking. 

At almost every stop, guests are 
warned not to speak unless spoken 
to, and they miraculously comply. 
Walls are painted, streets are 
?t, pools are drained and sam- 


The White House even ripped up 
pan of the Rose Garden to make a 
proper place for the tent that 


Through it all, unfazed, the im- 
perial party moves here and there, 
nodding and softly voicing appreci- 
ation, nearly invisible for all their 
visibility. Politeness rules the day. 

The point of all this is to let 
America put its best foot forward 
while tbe imperial couple descends 
from tbe celestial heights to get a 
taste of real life in America. 

But the gap exists nonetheless, 
and populism has its limits when it 
applies to even the best efforts of 
the imperial household. An Ameri- 
can ample offered their bouse to 
their majesties during a later stop 
in a city the Japanese Embassy did 
not want disclosed. But there will 


One dessert — sweets shaped like pieces 
of sushi — fell about as flat as mint pork 
rinds might among Americans in Tokyo. 



smoke with wild abandon, com- 
plain constantly about the heat and 


size cellular telephones. During 
ceremonies at the White House, at 
least five reporters simultaneously 
whispered stray details into the cy- 
. berspace over the Pacific. AD the 
while, the whole event was being 
televised live in Japan. 

As emperor and empress sweep 
through a 16-day, 1 1-city tour of 


boused President Bill Clinton's 
first official state dinner on Mon- 
day night. But one dessert — 
sweets shaped like pieces of sushi 
— fefl about as flat as mint port: 
rinds might among Americans in 
Tokyo. And the forks and knives 
on at least one table were complete- 
ly out of order. 

The formal dinner, too, put the 
dMMdsin and understatement of 
Japanese style in sharp contrast 
with tbe exuberant excesses of 
some American guests. The em- 
press, whose manner is as demure 
as her attire is elegant, does not 
even color her nails. 

But the muted approach was not 
for Jane Fonda, who wore a diving 
neck line on a dark velvet dress 
adorned with billowy flowers, or 
the fashion designer Diane von 
Furstenberg, who arrived in a pas- 
tel concoction that looked like an 
explosion in a sherbet factory. 


be no family barbecue. Instead, 
they have agreed to leave the house 
dunng the imperial visiL 

The host couple does not mind. 
Indeed, they are so careful to avoid 
any possible gaffe or perceived mis- 
step that they win not even describe 
what kind df area they live in and 
refer the question to the local 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Not everyone has been so con- 
strained. At a private reception for 
some of Washington's most influ- 
ential Japanese residents on Sun- 
day, guests were given standing 
charts as they entered the ambassa- 
dor 1 5 formidable residence and 
quickly briefed about the etiquette 
of the moment. 


“They told us to stand in back. 11 
said Hilary Jucichi, the American 
wife of the Washington bureau 
chief of TV Asahi, a Japanese net- 
work. “I just couldn't believe it." 

Things were a good deal less dec- 
orous in the evening On Sunday 
night, when the emperor and the 
empr e ss an ended a reception after 
a private concert at the Kennedy 
Center for the Performing Arts, 
they were mobbed by the Washing- 
ton elite. 

“Melvin Laird was just pushing 
in there,” said Richard Carlson, the 
president of the Corporation for 
Public Broadcasting, feigning 
shock, referring to (he defense sec- 
retary in the Nixon administration. 
"He just shoved me aside." 

The crush around the empress 
was particularly intense. W illiam 
H. Webster made way for Winston 
Lord, who made way for Katharine 
Graham, who stepped aside for a 
member of the Kennedy Center's 
board. The squeeze, at times, was a 
little tight, and even the empress 
seemed a bit stunned. 


Tbe ground rules were simple: 
State your name and professional 
affiliation. Do not engage the royal 
couple in idle conversation. And 
wives, please stand behind your 
husba 


Children at every slop have been 
far less aggressive fans. They have 
bowed ana curtsied and, at a stop 
at tbe Great Falls Elementary 
School in Virginia on Tuesday, 
even allowed their majesties to 
watch as they stumbled through 
fractions — in Japanese. 

A day earlier, at the Very Special 
Arts center in Washington, Ryan 
Murhart, a mentally retarded child, 
meekly greeted the empress and 
then extended a bfll of play money. 

The empress appeared charmed. 

She smiled, inclined her head at a 
slight angle and then shared the 
moment with her husband He ra 
smiled, too, and then pulled a 
matching bill from his suit pocket. 

The money was not real, but the 
exchange was. And it made the 
royal couple laugh and laugh. 



Tinkering, 
Or Real 
Reform of 
Welfare? 


By Jason DeParle 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — For all its 
complexity. President BiQ Clin- 
ton’s welfare plan will be judged by 
one, seemingly simple standard: 
Does it deliver on his famous 
pledge “to end welfare as wc know 
it"? 

He has reasons to aigue that it 
does. The president has proposed a 
set of won requirements far strict- 
er than those advocated by his pre- 
decessors, and penalties that are far 
more severe. When his program is 
fully in place, women who refuse to 
join a work program will get no 
more money. Period 

But it is less certain whether Mr. 
Clinton's program will satisfy tbe 
expectation of fundamental change 
that his own insistently bold lan- 


guage has helped create, and that 
his poli 


political opponents are eager to 
iloit 


Empress Micbiko examining documents during a tour of Hie Library of Congress. 


Pamri* PrarAgcntr Frmct Pro * 


AMERICAN 


TOPICS 


Court Upholds Right 
To Post Signs in Yard 


Communities may not stop 
anyone from posting a sign in 
tbefront yard or a banner in the 
window announcing one’s poli- 
tics or the baby’s arrival, the 
UJSL Supreme Conrt has ruled 
in a 9-to-O dpmion. ^ . ; 

The ruta%? ameohing an 
anti- sign ordinance in Ladnc, 
Missouri, a wealthy suburb of 
Sl Louis, shows how munici- 
palities, in trying to control vi- 
sual blight, may be infringing 
on constitutional guarantees of 
freedom of speech. 

Lad lie's ordinance generally 
prohibited all signs except for 
real estate signs, road and safe- 
ty hazard signs, 1 health inspec- 
tion signs, public transporta- 
tion markers and commercial 
signs m commercially zoned or 
industrial districts. 

Tire ordinance was chal : 
1 caged by Margaret Gtfleo who, 
in late 1990 as the U.S.-led war 
with Iraq was imminent, put a 
mud! anti-war sign in tbe sec- 
ond-floor window of her 00 J 0 - 
mal-style home. The sun said 
"For Peace in the Gulf. 

Justice John Paul Stevens 
wrote for the court, “Signs that 
react to a local happening or 
express a view on a controver- 
sial issue both reflect and ani- 
mate change in the life of a 
community.” He acknowl- 
edged, however, that "unlike 
oral speech, signs take up space 
and may obstruct views, dis- 
tract motorists, displace alter- 
native uses for land and pose 
other problems that legitimate- 
ly call for regulation." 

The ruling does not affect cit- 


ies' ability to regulate the size 
and number *’ J 


of home signs, and 

Juaice Stevens suggested resi- 
dents themselves, trying to keep 
up property values, are likely a 
check on sign proliferation. 


Short Takes 


Doctors should improve their 
handwriting, the American 
Medical Association says. Inde- 
cipherable prescriptions are leg- 
endary. The association's board 
of trustees found that prescrip- 
tion errors “are not rare 
events." It said that neatly one 
in 25 hospital patients in the 
United States suffers an ad- 
verse reaction to something 
done by a doctor or tire hospi- 
tal Excluding surgery, prescrip- 
tion errors are the leading cause 
of such problems. 

- The WSy ^Postal Service is 
taring millio ns of dollars from 
the fraudulent rigging, of some 
of country’s 1.4 million postage 
meters, according to the Gener- 
al Accounting Office, the inves- 


percent of U.S. mail is me- 
tered, producing more than 
twice the revenue of stamps. 
But, the office said, most of the 
machines in use today still em- 
ploy essentially the same me- 
chanical technology of the first 
machines introduced in the 
1920s. The office said postal of- 
ficials should press meter man- 
ufacturers to develop newer 
machin es that would be less 
vulnerable to fraud. 


When is a White House din- 
ner a state firmer and when isn't 

it? This week's dinner President 
and Mrs. Bill Clinton gave at 
the White House for Emperor 
Alrihi tn and Empress Mtahiko 
of Japan was definitely a state 
dinner . But last November, Mr. 
Clinton ened when he called his 
dinn er for the South Korean 
president, Kim Young Sam, a 
“state dinner.” It tacked and 
tasted just like one. Bui the for- 
eign ministries of South Korea 
and the United States had de- 
clared the Kim visit an official 
visit, not a state visit "The only 
difference is the arrival ceremo- 
ny, which takes place in the 
morning, and the delegation 
■ages and things tike that,” a 
State Department spokesman 
said. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Henry Mancini, 6 Moon River’ Composer, Dies at 70 


By Richard Severe 

New York Times Service 


Henry Mancini, 70, a prolific composer 


whose music was beard in hundreds of films 
and television shows and who won four 
Academy Awards in a career that spanned 
more than 40 years, died of cancer Tuesday 
at his home in Los Angeles. 

Counting the movies for winch he wrote 
music for just a scene or two. as he did when 
be was a fledgling staff composer with Uni- 
versal-International for six years in the 
1950s, Mr. Mandril's work was heard in 
nearly 250 films. 

He worked quickly and his output was 
prodigious. His best-known songs were 
“Moon River," which was sung by Audrey 
Hepburn in the 1961 movie "Breakfast at 
Tiffany’s," and “Days of Wine and Roses,” 
which was the basis of thematic material 
used in the 1962 mode of the same name, 
starring Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick. 


Both songs had lyrics by Johnny Mercer and 
both won Academy Awards. 

Mr. Mancini also won an Academy Award 
for the entire score for “Breakfast at Tiffa- 
ny's" and another for the score for the 1982 
film “Vtctor/Victoria.’' He also received 
Academy Award nominations for his scores 


tation of “Victor/Victoria." He had written 
25 new songs for the production, which is 
scheduled to open on Broadway this faO. 


Marcel Moufloodji, 71, Singer 
And Poet in Postwar France 


“Comme un Petit Coquelicot,” "Le Deser- 
teur," “Ceux qui s’ Aimed,” and “Un lour 
Tu Verras." 

He also appeared in several films from the 
late 1930s to the late 1950s, and wrote 10 
books and four plays. 


for “The Glenn Miller Story" < 1954K “Cba 


The Associated Press 


rade" (19631; “The Pink Panther" (1964), 
and 14 other films. 

In television, he created the themes -for 
“Peter Gunn" and “Mr. Lucky," both serial- 
ized in the late 1950s and early '60s. 

The producer of “Peter Gunn," Blake Ed- 
wards, said that much of the success of the 
detective series was due to Mr. Mancini's 
undulating score, in which a guitar and piano 
played in unison to achieve what Mr. Man- 
cini called “a sinister effect with some fright- 
ened saxophones and some shouting brass.” 

At the tune of his death Mr. Mancini was 
completing work on a musical-theater adap- 


PARJS — Marcel Mouiou^i, 71. a popu- 
ir Ft 


lar singer and poet in postwar France known 
for his mellow, trembling voice, died Tues- 
day in a hospital in Neuilly-su r-Seine. near 
Paris. 

Born in Paris to a Moroccan bricklayer 
and a mother from Brittany, Mr. Moulondji 
was known as “ k petit coquelicot r ' (“the little 
poppy”). 

He first stepped onstage in 1932 at the age 
of 10 in Paris. He gained fame as a singer in 
the late 1950s, performing songs written by 
Jacques Prfcven, Raymond Queneau and Bo- 
ris Vi an. as well as his own works. 

The best known of his recordings include 


Takeshi AraJd, 78, the former mayor of 
Hiroshima, Japan, who made a mission of 
rid 


urging the world to abolish nuclear weapons, 
died of pneumonia Wednesday. 

Frank J. Starzd, 90. who as chief executive 
officer of The Associated Press helped usher 
in technological improvements and pressed 
for better coverage of political and economic 
trends, died Tuesdav in Denver. 


James B. Pollack, 55, the senior research 
scientist in tbe space science division of the 
National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration’s Ames Research Center at Moffett 
Field, California, died or cancer Monday in 
San Jose. California. 


exploiL 

Right after it was presented. Re- 
publicans moved quickly to de- 
nounce the plan, with its slow 
phase-in, as tepid and small. They 
called it a defense of welfare rather 
than an end to it 

“Tinkering,” said Governor 
Tommy G. Thompson of Wiscon- 
sin. 

“Exactly wrong,” said Represen- 
tative Newt Gingrich of Georgia, 
the House minority whip. 

But their fervor may reflect a 
fear that the president is stealing 
the issue by proposing a stricter 
plan than any Republican presi- 
dent has proposed. Though Con- 
gress is unlikely to act in the short 
legislative season that remains ibis 
year. Mr. Clinton's plan would 
bring the most significant change 
since the program began in the 
New Deal. 

“This plan is a step toward end- 
ing the current welfare system.” 
said Judith Gueron, president of 
Manpower Demonstration Re- 
search Corp., a New York firm that 
evaluates welfare programs. “It's 
not as large a step as was promised, 
or as the public anticipates. But 
greater change would require 
spending a lot more money." 

The plan would primarily affect 
women and children, the 143 mil- 
lion who receive monthly checks 
from Aid to Families With Depen- 
dent Children, the main federal 
welfare program. Its rules would 
not apply to the mix of state wel- 
fare programs that cover single 
men and women or people with 
disabilities. 

The president’s plan would give 
recipients additional training, but 
would require those still on the 


rolls after two years 10 join a work 
vne 


program. For those who had not 
four 


Simpson’s Attorney Drops the Case , 
New Lawyer Says Client Has Alibi 


Away From Politics 


found jobs on their own, the pro- 
grams would offer subsidized jobs 
at the minimum wage, whether 
with private employers, govera- 


The Associated Pros 


LOS ANGELES — O. J. Simp- 
m the 


son’s lawyer withdrew from 
case an Wednesday, and his new 
attorney said the retired football 
star was at bis home waiting for a 
timouaiie when his former wife and 
a waiter were slain two miles away. 

“At tbe time this murder took 
place, O. J. was at home waiting to 
get into a limousine to take him to 
the airport on a trip that had been 


planned well in advance for a pro- 
' ' ‘ “ Rob- 


motional event in Chicago,' 
ert Shapiro said shortly after taking 
over the case. 

He said Mr. Simpson was in se- 
clusion with his family and under a * 
doctor's care. 

Earlier in the day, Howard 
Weitzman withdrew as Mr. Simp- 
son's lawyer. 

‘I have derided because of my 
relationship with O. J. 
and my many other pro- 


fessional commitments, I can no 
laager give O. J. the attention he 
both deserves and needs," Mr. 
Weioxoan said. 

The attorney, who has been han- 

a sex- abuse allegations against 
id Jackson for 10 months, 
added, Tm already busy enough.” 

The body of Nicole Simpson, 35, 
and that of Ronald L. Goldman.' 
25, a waiter at a restaurant nearby, 
were found outside her home at 
12:10 A.M. .Monday. She and Mr. 
Simpson divorced in 1991 
•Mr.. Simpson, 46. has denied any 
involvement in the slayings. 

Ms. Simpson's throat was 
slashed, and Mr. Goldman's 
wounds indicated that he put up a 
fierce struggle before he died, in- 
vestigators said. 

Mr. Simpson had scratches on 
his body when the police ques- 
tioned him Monday, the Los Ange- 
les Times reported. 


Authorities withheld other de- 
tails, including an estimated time 
of death, but Mr. Weitzman said 
the police believe the killings oc- 
curred about 1 1 P.M. Sunday. 

Mr. Simpson left Los Angeles 
■Sunday on an 11:45 PM. flight to 
Chicago, Mr. Weitzman said. The 
airport is a 20-minute drive from 
Mr. Simpson's home. 

The police found a trail of red- 
dish-brown stains leading up Mr. 
Simpson's driveway. The Times 
said the drops had been determined 
to be blood. 

Investigators also removed 
bloodstained patches of carpet 
from Mr. Simpson's Ford Bronco. 

A bloody glove found inside Mr. 
Simpson's house matched a glove 
found al the scene of the crime, the 
Times reported. Mr. Weitzman 
said the police bad told him that 
the glove was not at Mr. Simpson's 
house. 


• Rabbi Menacbem Schneerson 
left his estate, estimated at less than 
$50,000, to the worldwide enter- 
prises of his Lubavitcher Hasidic 
organization, but left no instruc- 
tions on naming a possible succes- 
sor. Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky, one of 
Rabbi Schneerson’s aides and the 
executor of his estate, said tbe Lu- 
ba viteber movement was “handi- 
capped and orphaned” by the 
death of its rebbe, who followers 
believe to be the Messiah prophe- 
sied in the Old Testament. 


man!” as be took his last gasps in 
North Carolina. David Lawson, 38, 
was executed for the 1980 murder 
of Wayne Shinn, who caught Mr. 
Lawson breaking into his house. 


meats or nonprofit groups. 


• Three njen, Indnding two broth- 
ers described by prosecutors as 
chief heroin smugglers for the 
Gambino crime family, were sen- 
traced to 15 years in prison in New 
York for racketeering and conspir- 
ing to violate federal racketeering 
charges. 


• A conservative minister who fa- 
vors reconciliation with moderates 
in the Southern Baptist Convention 
was narrowly elected president of 
the largest Protestant denomina- 
tion in the United States. The Rev- 
erend Jim Henry of Fust Baptist 
Church in Orlando. Florida, won 
55 percent of the vole on the open- 
ing day of the denomination's 
137th annual meeting, 

• A kOlerwbo wanted his gas cham- 
ber execution televised on Phi! 
Donahue’s television program 
screamed. “I’m human! I'm hu- 


• Hetuy S. Bienen, 55, dean of the 
Woodrow Wilson School of Public 
and International Affairs at Prince- 
ton University and a political sci- 
entist with wide experience as a 
government consultant, has been 

named the 15th president of North- 
western University in Evanston. Il- 
linois. at. .v >T 


For the public, the first surprise 
may be that the Clinton plan, like 
all work programs, would cost 
more than the status quo. 

It would spend $93 billion over 
five yean on training, child care 
and job subsidies, and even that 
sum buys a phase-in so gradual that 
by 1999, only about 8 percent of 
the nation's welfare recipients win 
be working for their benefits. 

And that is when the costs really 
begin to rise. Although the docu- 
ments made public Tuesday do not 
say so, the plan is expected to cost 
more than twice as much in tbe 
second five years. 

If the government does not have 
the money to create the subsidized 
jobs, it could not enforce the two- 
year limit. An impatient public, 
recognizing little change, might 
balk at (he bill before the program 
ever hits its stride. 


Farrakhan Gets Respectful Welcome 


At a Mainstream Black Conference 


i '• The- Associated Press 

BALTIMORE — He got the 
loudest app lause al public meet- 
mgs, ami audiences in packed aodi- 
. tomans subsided to a hush when he 
spoke. Tbe participation by the Na- 
tion of Islam leader Louis Farrak- 
han jaji national conference of 
black leaders showed that if be is 
notbemg welcomed into the main- 
stream^aL least he is being wel- 
comed by it. 

, J Other participants said Mr. Far- 
rakhan nt neatly into the crowd of 
■ business, academic, political and 
-cafl rights -leaders who attended 
the conference, which was spon- 
sored by the National Associ ation 
. for .'ike Advancement of Colored 


Here, his right to be included 
among the 100 delegates at tbe 
meeting was championed repeated- 
ly. 


“Never again wiD we allow any 
external force to the African-Amer- 
ican community at temp t to dictate 
who we can meet with, where we 
can meet and what we're going to 
meet about. Never aga in ," said 
Benjamin Chavis Jr., executive di- 
rector of the NAACP, after the 
three-day conference ended Tues- 
day. 

Jewish groups protested at near- 
every conference event, arguing 

„at the NAACFs invitation to Mr. 
Farrakhan le gitimi z e d his anti-Se- 
mitic views. . 


NAACP did not provide a list of 
those who attended. 

Clarence Mitchell 3d, who is a 
member of a prominent Baltimore 
family and has been active in the 


civil rights movement for decades, 
lid Mr. Fairakhan’s participation 


& 


hedidn’thave a «ame ug I proha- 
bty wouktaH have reaKzfitl il was 
him,”. said Diane Porter, a repre- 
sentative of the Episcopal Church. 

: “Hews cnnptett&UDlike **= per- 
son hejud been portrayed to be. 

' Although Mr. Farrakhan denies 
beaahtiSmi&i Us fiesy speeches 
javemade him the focus of cn&- 
cism and tad some black leaders to 
idistmiqe-'iheinselves from him. 


The conference ended after 
members formed committees to ad- 
dress the themes of economic de- 
velopment, youth and community 
empowerment, and moral and spar- 
ine! renewal The delegates agreed 


to meet here again is two months. 

The group released no details of 
its private sessions, which wens in- 
tended to forge a new civil rights 
agenda for the nation's blades. The 


said 

was welcome. 

“There have been several other 
summits where he was excluded, 
and I did not participate," Mr. 
Mitchell said. “I thought there 
should he representation from all 
segments erf the African-American 
community: And be has a constitu- 
ency.” 

At a televised public meeting, 
Mr. Farrakhan exhorted pregnant 
blades not to have abortions. His 
mother bad tried three times to 
abort a pregnancy, failing each 

time, he said. 

“After three times, rite decided 
to have the child, and that child 
was me," be said. 

He urged blacks to join the 
NAACP. 

“I do not fed that I am a strang- 
er, that I have been invited into a 
house that does not belong to me," 
Mr. Farrakhan said. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Dole Won't Get Behind Curve 


that he had not made a decision, but several said 
they believed that he would probably run. (NYTi 


WASHINGTON — Taking a clear step toward 
a race for the Republican nomination for president 
in 1996, Senator Bob Dole of Kansas has instruct- 
ed his advisers to seek commitments from political 
strategists and fund-raisers around the country 
before other candidates lock them up. 

Mr. Dole emphasized in an interview that he had 
not decided whether to run. But he said he had 
given the go-ahead for his advisers to move quickly 
because be did not want other contenders to get an 
edge in building organizations, as happened in his 
bid to wrest the Republican nomination from Vice 
President George Bush in 1988. 

Although he has not assembled a preliminary' 
campaign operation, and described the contacts 
with strategists as informal, Mr. Dole's political 
action committee. Campaign America, has hired 
more than a half-dozen field workers in important 
primary states, including Iowa and New Hamp- 
shire. 

“Whether or not 1 do it, you've got to be pre- 
pared,” Mr. Dole said in a telephone interview. “If 
you're going to get into Lhis thing, you ought not 


Return to Scene of the Boast 


TRENTON, New Jersey — Like a sinner to the 
altar. Ed Rollins relumed to New Jersey, seeking 
forgiveness from the same black ministers he once 
boasted that he had bought. 

The Republican campaign consultant stood be- 
fore the Black Ministers Council in a church base- 
ment in Trenton und apologized for claiming last 
November that he had helped Governor Christie 
Whitman win election by suppressing black voter 
turnout. 

At the time. Mr. Rollins told reporters that the 
Whitman campaign bad paid black ministers not 
to encourage thdr congregations to vote for the 
incumbent. Governor Jim Florio. He quickly re- 
canted, and a federal inquiry found no evidence of 


such payments, 
behz 


"My behavior was inexcusable, and 1 do come 
here with deep remorse," Mr. Rollrns said, his 
voice steady, his bands slightly trembling. “1 regret 

what I said. It wasn't true.” (NYTi 


wait until after next year. If you wait until you 
be behi 


lind the curve. I’ve 


decide to do iu you may 
had that happen to me.” 

As the Senate Republican leader and the most 
visible Republican in the country. Mr. Dole would 
be viewed as an instant front-runner, particularly 
si nce no strong challenger has emerged from the 
field of Republicans who are considering taking on 
President Bill Gin ton. 

Echoing Mr. Dole, his advisers said in interviews 


Quote / Unquote 


President Clinton, unveiling his welfare-reform 
plan: “We propose to offer people on welfare a 
simple con tract. We will help \ou get the skills you 
need, but after two years anyone who can go to 
work must go to work — in the private sector if 
possible, in a subsidized job if necessary. But work 
is preferable to welfare. And il must be enfor- 
ced" tHT) 


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Tel: 41-41-636 252. Fax: 41-41-635 544 



EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


□IT OR - Qwinen/ nviCQZiPf on 
intefnanoncl Uranea. 2 d yew: m 
publication with 

□rtutonor. ■:.! 1109%. r.«± ■Midel. 
«peritn:«c edne to be Euiacacn 

bureau rjeel a « H m.'it fc< 

hrr root. Heodqu nrttn ei N*» tert. 
bureau legation ftoiblfc. 
ific-utd he.v .a toy fry* ,e«ri 
wpansne* 01 tito **iter cl buuna; 
ne«a rtvoucftoji E vropc. Must ho./» 

familiarity uuifh oil foci: glob-i 
binned Anal. ml approach. ?W«* 
10 pul ll«c Irge wxJ ;mrj m 
oorte-l at global bwmeu jre morn 
US.ongled sto u& not _ urn ancem. 
Would be re-^onaNe :<y taetopna 
stringer nelwjrt C'V.:ei<iry o»-jr»rig 
«to*«s'pKnm PjR'wgv edanq. Mui: 
be energenc. «ei[ 

■xoarawa capafcl? j _r'f ii.mra™, jia** 
foiovnng though ;hi>.ihj to 'po^ei ■ 
fill, char tniltt jtfc ii> r*Jp £.ir*r; 
became so Put ocpwhimrv ior 
hgWy quafified pwsoa Mem :< 

pert ot cannajmciuwn on nv Wgc. 
hagHv succnilul ®d gto»mg cc-c-:- 
r*or Sdr. generous icn'iimer-A'iote 
«nb e epenerkt Peply wih lore aid 
resume led! Held confide mol) :* 
Eku EW. I.HT . 650 Th."> A Prh FI. 
NY. NY ICO?? UoA 


SA1ES/ MARKETING EXECUTIVE 
EUROPEAN 0PHAT1ONS 

Inttmaiicnal Errni hourr; manut'K 
lurer wrrfi manjiacrwirta larMes m 
Ireland. eslobtrlieiij in W. t. -eeinj a 
5ales Mafleiin 7 Ex-cun-e ».rh 

European Inter TOtijaal sal« «*pr»ence 
of consumer goods 10 marie 1 10 
European reia das 

Cantsdare should be muln-tngwl 
EnpSuh and Fiends (ipamih a pal .jd 
iesde in friv« 

Fr.sduci fcne a mqw branded spun 
hosiery targeted to nsaii :ei®ler: and 
sports leisure rerpler: (onh .ranAdjVS 
»nth I he above experience need apply/ 
Compemalian commensiirnie •■•h 
cspenence and perhamence 
Phase f®> resume, salary he: or. to 
Now York (2121 689-3874 

EXECITTVE.S AVAILABLE 

ZURICH BASED SWISS LADY, rer> 
pesenictole end free » nurd *ci 
roma degree fluert in fnglch. 
Germar. Fiench and SmusIi t<«w- 
hve evpenenw « portfok, inaiwje 
ond flresfmeAl ad.iler. n lodng ic* 
a now dicJhn^e. areferaiL on a 

lued income bmu. Please Be* 3b-' 

1H.T, 7?5}l Neurily C-de., Figrce 

Triingval Wamai. 25 
FRB4CH - 94GUSH - RUSSIAN 
High aduccnon degre«. acetal 
preen lotion. weL ne— 

INTI CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITY 
Please dwe 33-1J ib S3 33 
or Fa* [33-1J *1 \'i V> 3? 


With experience in futures, options and stock 
trading, young and enterprising, willing to relocate to 
Northern Italy for an extraordinary opportunity in a 
young and aggressive broking company. 

Salary and performance fee related to proven 
experience and results. 

Write with resume ivul snhiru requirements tv: 
FERMO POSTA Cl." 27376*01, 
lOinn TORINO. ITALY 


AMERICAN FEMALE AI70RNFY. 

swh « 6 lf<oillMnsolti: ptrjrLDn ,n 
Euiojw > Eaii^n U 5 S ttlrc 
infer «lmc »oil, erht;rrl peorle. 
tniernaiiancl Travel Pres-.g.ous 
educuiion 5— ,. 0 ;S --;>r>*n» 

E'lensi-e iiyn^ichciW «vo ,; -.i 

imennlwril ccrsr < and -.iroty; ;:ca- 
cuhiral pervk Ms Rue.r 'St-rdi 
Teei- Gemwift nn-| Ircli.ir. a|| 
tansy! .-am j 5 £._ ' m ;j| 

V.jhnnqiOiT. [j.il 2 iXCl 

DUTCH SPEAKING AmMicm A-ij frw , 

jnrwlrjde as egen: cr canlay pirvnr, 
for ^menc.-,, or Europew, f.rm 00 
e.ctug (O ihe Nerheilands W»um o- 
J h* U-S ‘?pe» 10 cie.-mwier,:. I-jr-s o< 
shy! Itrm asscdia^on. Cartart" f 
Freedmar, to- t- 21 20 Co 15 ;ijS8 [.«« 
teufrocf 40 HS. 1017 Anuie-'dam 
The Netfiethnds 

BBGIAN EXPORT MANAGER, 37, 

erpenence m E^ope. AVs*. £. >t 
Ca n a d a . Crnna. ipcooltst m pron^-^fir^ 
products and devetofvra eustorr^i 

ieefa POU'ion m‘ mdnLn^vd 

*9*1. PP- v r fiorl.einia eswenmen: 

GENERAL POSITIONS 

AVAJUBI.E 

SALES RETOaMTATlVES - Mqo, 
mil fine a.f 'crtigue eipounnn hnu 
;eeh iec?; 5 rd sd« reps m Eutope S 
Am Art •’Anaque- .ndusir, l/rawiettge 
i eipenerva 'Wed Caree, p m . 
Wit Fa* crmplele resume ‘«r irir^. 
Am HWricv-- to ■uIT-JTC-jTSQ usa 

TRANSLATION AGS4CY 
**As FRfflANCE TRANSLATORS 

an errer fhe worfd 
JWc ewiw. ALPHA INTER 
9?. 'oe La Eoene 7500B P,^n. 


. SPEAK AND GROW RICH 

Jcnc ibe amoang Self Empower meni 
serowr mc-’emwl & earn 3100H. com- 
nsuor Manager: & P-eryona! Deetiors 
needed, ecm up r-j ejQTf qi SH | 
You musr be ,m artiajkife ;nl lule. «lh 

a htapr, ol earring JjOK per ve.jr 
Co9 h USA fo 5-??4 JSO0 o< 
TO-343- S50C. b> June 22 


AN AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 
IN PARS n tooling For 
A LIBRARIAN with vaAd worlmg po- 
pers. bilmgual French- Engfch. Setw 
(*oto - lerer - CV icr‘ 60 . 3630. 
I.HT, P25?l Neuiffy Cede*. Fiance. 

IT MAGAZ1FE. Pans area, seels 
PtFEPlEfUTED EDrT.DP, M * pan. 
time i»aible i English mcdier lar^ue. 
Ctowfcrtoe o: French or Gernwi ie- 
cwri 2esh tee- P3^ll ~j) 02 y 71 
IT MAGAZINE. Parr, area seels SALES 
F EPS ON fWnl Encash. Sepl, to fa< 

(23-1) j^O? 3° ~1,~ 

GENERAL POSmONS 
WANTED 


YOUNG AMERICAN WOMAN, 

ou&j lascnatvd - M m worij suliwe, 
«wnes ro eipcnd he. hprriaij. flad- 
grcijnd .n cetebnry Idem coorrinah-jn, 

public n»f *3 rel 3 fr;ni «nimg $ei>l^ 

ne« chdtaae as ^less'Kioal. 
pwsoful owhF; s^aLoperson lor 
pominenj imeimncirjyl business ail- 
rural ‘Ogjlomoh: leader ■ organaabon, 
Ewepnonallf :dsnfed. resauiceU 
I'ngwi. lujraie. doophned Desirous 
f ’IS* 1 Wgn 'efocaiion Bepl, 
Ef. 579a. I.HT , 450 Tlwd Ave. Sfh fl 
MY.Nf IWKUSlA. 



STOCKBROKERAGE FIRM 

seeks senior translator 
for its financial analysis department 

Your responsibilities will include: 

• Translation 

- translating analysts' reports; 

- reviewing translations effected by outside sources- ■' 

• Relationship v.ith external translators- 

- dispatching the material to be translated; 

- outsourcing selection and service contract negotiations. 

• Participation in the editorial policy ot the Financial Analysis department 

- colla bora ling with [he director of research on the product's format and content; 

- formulating titles, margin remarks, summaries/co ndu$k>ns. 

• Suoerwsion of me In-house translation team 

We are looking ior a native English speaker, with excellent writing skids and fluency in French. You 
have ai least 3 to 4 years' experience in the slock exchange or financial sector, in addition to a know- 
ledge of financial analysis. You are eager, flexible and capable of Taking Initiatives. 

The position is based in Paris. Salary v.ill depend on the candidate's qualifications- 

Please send your application to: 

CHEUVREUX DE VIRIEU S.A. Direction du Personnel 
46, rue de Courcelles, 75008 PARIS 


Communications Week IrTtematM# 

the newspaper of global networking- .• • r _ y. ; ' 

is looking tor. . . . ' 1 : - .' Q 

Full-time and Freelance News Reporter*. > 
based In London or Parte .... • 

AS the infonratton 

Since 1988 the only f’ewspaper^ ^^^^^o 
who can break major stories m the 

information systems sectors. You should f^e j I 

gathering, preferably In one of 
Sriads it toe highest levels of t» 
reporting experience is r »5 uIr ®i^ 

English. You must be able to write in Er^h 

Thework is demanding; the rewatois Wt* 

exciting changes taking place in the way business awt society, \jftM 

fnformitlon. We offer attractive sa^padiagto.^JP^ 

E20.00W200.000FF plus benefits and 4-5 weeks vacaton - erid gpp^v 

prospects for the right people.- 

Apply In writfog wttti CV/resume to: 

Udcdm Laws, Editor, CwmuHitastow 
Publications, 14, rue de Bassano, 75116 

Or fax to: + 33 1 47 23 67 07 ' 7 '-'*,;; ;TV- :; ;: Tiw 

CMPbanegualoworturtHesenpIqfff • -y ; ' 




neral Manager 

Far East 


Our client, u leading European-baied manufacturing 
group priv.luvinu Mate-of-lhc-an electronic products, is 
rocogni.-ed :i> the uorld leader within its field. As pan 
».**.' its siruiecic development, this well-known supplier 
to u w ioe range of industrial u-^eis ‘Aorld-w ide is 
•.eekinc Jo expand further within it> cxisiins Far East 
market’* while capitalising on ihe considerable 
•j round work alreadx undertaken by its >ales 
Mib-iJiartC'. cii%iributo^ and ageni<. and to diversifs 1 
inn* complete!} new markets in ihe region. 

Ke\ ;o thi* ■* access i*. the appoimment of a General 
Manager so spearhead activities Litroughout the entire 
Far Ease ;uid assume overall operational and financial 
responsibility for achiex ing group goals. This hands-on 
role involxe- considerable travel and demands thorough 
knowledge and experience of doing business throughout 
the Far Eum including the training, motivation and control 
of a network of subsidiaries, distributors and agents. 

An iniiU major task will be to reorganise and 


implement a new and competitive market-driven sales 
organisation. We are looking for a high-calibre General 
Manager, ideally aged 40-50 and educated to degree 
level within engineering and/or business, who can 
demonstrate a successful track record from similar 
positions as General Manager with full P&L 
responsibility. Previous sales management experience 
achieved in a business- to-business environment and 
first -class managerial and commercial skills ideally 
gained within a multinational environment are 
essential. Exposure to the European business culture 
would be an advantage. 

Based in either Hong Kong or Singapore, this position 
carries an extremely competitive salary and benefits 
package. To apply, please send a full cv in confidence, 
including a photo and current remuneration level, to 
Soren Jansen. Ref: 480.00.416, PA Consulting Group, 
42 Gster AIM. 2100 Copenhaaen. Denmark. 

Fax (+45) 32 25 51 08. 


T3A Consulting 
JLn» Group 


JLTlu Group 

Creating Business .Advantage 

E*.-.-u:i.cRc.nii:>nrB( HiL-Sj.-P.s 10 u.- 7 e Cs*s-_il»aa* AA*;rtisin’ snd Com nun Icjikjm 



YOU SAW TfflS AD 

So did nearly Half a mi n h « 

weB-edncaied, mibmAiI aod 
suaxssTal readers. . 
Shndfa't you tooptace your 
rcaitimeor ads m me - • 

INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE? 


Chuta an 
par fu-nity 

^Zpqr.your 
career 



IDUKE 


• ■*>> ■ -a... . 

. .y.‘i « . s > i a --/. ■' s 

*. •- -i. 1 . : i- T; ;, ; v ■ ■■ :* ■■ ' 1 *• -• 


One iff the tnlcnuilional 
«Vi’fcr/,i/7.» t*f u large French 
i/rvupe /.* netting up imhwtrial 
t'fvmtiiin .1 in China in the 
textile ,’cctor ant) i.< offering 
profc.i.iu’naLi .tpeaking 
Mandarin Chine.*' and English 
the opportunity to Join the world 
leader in ito field with a 
turnover of -i billion FT and a 
.itnffo/' T.iHkJ. 


Industrial 
Project Manager 

Graduate of an engineering school wifn a 
successful free 1- record in proieci manoaemenf. 
you will be in charge of setting up our factory 
in Ch.nc. faking responsibiiiiy for the plant’s 
instoHction, the selection and Training of its 
s'cff and the ir.itiai sfeges cf production. 

Ref. 13455/CP 

Engineers 

Graduates of engineering schools with 
successful experience, you will assist The 
project manager in the fields of construction, 
sfaff training and operational start-up of 
production. Afterwards, you will be directly 
involved in ongoing factory operations. 

Ref. 13455/IN 


For these Truly challenging positions, 
please send letter, CV and photo indicating the 
position's reference to EUROMESSAGES - BP 80 
92105 BOULOGNE Cedex FRANCE. 



DEAN 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Duke University invites applications and nominations for ibe 
position of Dean of the Fuqua School of Business- the School is' 
a major center for management research and education with an 
MBA Program, an Executive MBA Program, and a PJLD-. 
Program, as well as a large and growing program of Executive 
Education and an active set of faculty research programs. 

The Dean of the Fuqua School of Business is its chief 
executive officer and is responsible to the Provost and the 
President for academic and administrative leadership of the 
school. The Dean must have a commitment to -hatter tihe-- - 
teaching and research goals of a professional school wiUtin a 
major research university, and the leadership ability and vision to 
accomplish the school's goal of becoming a leader in manage- - 
ment education and research worldwide. He or she should have 1 
the respect of and respect for all of the school's partners, 
including faculty, students, staff, alumni, and corporate 
supporters. The management of corporate relationships and 
development will be important responsibilities of the Dean. The 
starting date is July 1, 1995. 

Applications and nominations should be sent to: Professor 
Wedey A. Magat, Chair, Dean Search Committee, Fuqua 
School of Business, Duke University, Box 90120, Durham, NC 
27708. FAX (919) 684-8742. 

Duke University is An Equal Opportunity/ 

Affirmative Action Employer. 



TH UNGUAL AMERICAN. Eoctpound 
JWBlww. Murom dr-retopmer*. ~- 
porous r.K. Strong oomniir 
mono ge roe nl. wr.hng^djnnQ 
computer literal?. Fiendi. 

‘jetwan Eipenenc; Jin ape. ttw 
Gut< 'e^on. UL See^ gulf, 
other oversea; 

LW.. Bw 107 
M2 ■ 210 US. 

BROKER. 3ft FEMALE tooting to pob. 
NFA<aiificnfe iene 3. DTV -certificate 

(German futoei .and tomodrfv nater) 
<iumg M&ft-’Jvd r 'ndy to travel, lot 
ot experience m Ecas .71 Europe, nml- 
nfiraiMJ English, 'jermcm. Lnssran. 
Won. Ciecr. Wa r»» StacF £■ 
drange ceitificaie. Ptione-0W ,J iO- 
fl8322<6 

CORPORATE FMANCE Germ®, no- 
"onol. 31. W .n Picked Finance, 
iljenr in Engfeh. French. FmstcA ex- 
perience in German M&.J 1 secior. 
commercial pmi, skLj nen iz-ugri- 
nwni in For IS cr Loncton. TeL Parr: 
(33-1} OQ 07 *3 51. 

RECENTLY RELOCATED AMERICAN, 

28, with imemaiional law & busmeu 
bakgramd seeto Euraperm based 
btuness rrcnmemeni pasitwn Cdl 
Jama Dtaugftjr m StocUiolin at 
+ <0 | 8 ) 667 6173 or write: P O Ben 
55521, S-102 Of Sipdihotm. Sweden 
FRBICH INTI CONSULTANT (ill with 
tewencei. merntr til rtw Ktorcrrd 
Chamber at Bnondd Cwmetas 
mks unnn«a>]l >^r marterubj nni- 
xm- ihort la fcna lerm, Evfare o< 
obracd. Te) 03-11 Si 30 98 32 


HOTEL/ RESTAURANT JOB Mato IB. 
good Fr.nctv fluetv Gei-rnon. Ermfish, 
Mart Aoq I fVp 716-yS-^fr-U^T 
YOUNG WOMAN. 75. seeh |ob as 
interpreter, french, engwh J iiaSan. 
Free w howl Tel Pan? I-jJ j7 19 


FffiNCH DRTVBL speda Engtoh & 
iiomon. seeks job m Pens or trance. 
Avabble now. Former tan dmier. 
Pfeovt co* Pam H I 4a 02 DC % 


US ATTORTffY LLM tax, 1 4 years ex- 

penance, mil. Evopem MSS,. Fhjeni 

German. US & FC-otcaton. seels 
pontioii. Tel r Fa, Mumch. 4t>jq-770fla3 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

ENGUSH MOTHER toiguo secretaries 
uigenlty needed to temporarr and 
perronenf pasawns Call SopMe. GS 
Inienm. Pans- p| <3 61 B2 II 

SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 
DO i YOU «l A TOP SECRETARY ? 

t-all Soahe. GR Interim Penn to. til 

42618211 11 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

PARSONS - PARIS 
seeks FACULTY for 

MARKETING. ECONOMC5. BUSIP€SS 
MATH EFFECTIVE WRITING. 
COMPUTE* INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 



EXECUTIVE CAREER 
CONSULTANTS 

USA * OVERSEAS JOB. 3000 pbs. 
I 4 C0 fimn largest currerr Is an the 
hurioel. Overseas jabs S3C USA tofas 
S2. Both padnges S55.VHa.Gc! 
Amen. Chners. Out Nth no. CAREft 
UNK WORLDWIDE 602 841 2136. 
PO Ben 11720 Ph»*«, AZ 85061. 
FAX 602 WT 5961. 


Groupe Umagrain 

The thinf larcwt seeJ jn J pi. me products company in the- world unphnred irv 
sxHintnes with .1 Turnover .if 4 billion Franc:, and 4 000 empFovces 
ts seeking for its head offices in FRANCE a 

Controller 

to assist the Finance Vice President 

The successful candidate’s mi*wn will be to assist with *11 hu r 

function.* : 3u Jit. owntadon. Comolidninn und Ic^d teni ° ri '“ F 

f-rtndiddl^ Will DOsteiS Master's Pw-rrr- ■ ; n 

with 8/10 years exrcnence gained i n ', n inr x * bnancial disciplines 

background. ^ ^ ^ financial tnanasemem 

Knowledge of Amcncjn culture would he desirable 

Flucnr En-lhh ,nj French i, «,„ ire d : Cennnn »'o u ld he ,n *U iIMB | K 
The posicion M-il! he ha«J in O.ERMONT FERRANH - France. 

Op? 

reference JLB'CT. ‘ bb - quoting the 


WHERE IS YOUR CAREER HEADED: 

JOB OPPORTUNITIES AND ANALYSIS IN IHE JUNE 23 

CAREER FOCUS 


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Vi ,IOnai -cap 

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iROPEAN 

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3UNSEL 


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""=■ I 


3H CONTROLS. INC. 
•***<» Systems Group 
9200 Halyard 
’ 0. Boi gate 
jth. M! USA 

. it 5-454-6314 


" W, J S-siS AD 



si;>> 


-• V. 


Cut in Fuel Imports 
Could Frode North’s 
Ability to Wage War 


By Michael Richardson 

Imemaaonul Herald Tribune 

SINGAPORE — North Korea 
has been hit by sharp cuts in vital 
fuel imports m recent months, ap- 
parent ly be cause or a shortage of 
hard currency for payments, energy 
specialists said Wednesday. 

But dwindling oil supplies are 
unfikely to curb the North’s ability 
to launch military reprisals against 
the South in response to interna- 
tional sanctions, the specialists 
said, although they would put it at 
a disadvantage in a protracted war 
that involved American and South 
Korean forces. 

Military analysts said the 
North's armed forces had almost 
certainly used previous imports of 
oil to stockpile substantial quanti- 
ties for military purposes. 

They said that even if long-term 
fud stocks were limited. it would 
not prevent the North from using 
Scud and Frog missiles or long- 
range artillery to strike at urban or 
mflitary targets in South Korea, in- 
cluding Seoul, which is only about 
40 kilometers (25 miles) from the 
Demilitarized Zone dividing the 
- two countries. 

Nonetheless, Lee Hoesung, pres- 
ident of the Korea Energy Eco- 
nomics Institute in Seoul, said 
North Korean imports of crude oil 
and refined products bad suffered 
“a drastic cur” to less than 10.000 
barrels a day, from around 70.000 
bands a day in 1991. 

He said in an interview that in 
. 1991, the North got its oil from 
three major suppliers — China, 
Russia and Iran — but was now 
heavily reliant on supplies via a 
pipeline from China. 

In a separate study, the East- 
West Center in Hawaii said C hina ’s 
move to raise domestic oO prices to 
levels that were higher than inter- 
national prices, while becoming a 
net oil importer itself, would place 
additional cons train Ls on Chinese 
oil exports to North Korea. 


The study, which was circulated 
Wednesday at an oil conference in 
Singapore co-sponsored by the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune and 
The Oil Daily Group, said that in 
the first quarter of 1994. China’s 
crude oil supplies to North Korea 
declined to 18.200 barrels per day. 

Although North Korea is self- 
sufficient in many sectors of its 
economy and well endowed with 
mineral resources, particularly 
coal, the study said it was “highly 
vulnerable with respect to oil/* 

The North's growing depen- 
dence on China for oil wit) increase 
Beijing's leverage in any crisis. 

There is no evidence, however, 
that China has been using its po- 
tential oil lever in recent months to 
uy to persuade Pyongyang to open 
iu suspect nuclear facilities to full 
international inspection. 

China, a longtime ally of the 
North Korean president. Kim II 
Sung, has repeatedly said that it 
regards sanctions as counterpro- 
ductive. It has called instead for 
more negotiations. 

Fereidun Fesharaki, director of 
the East-West Center’s program on 
resources and one of the co-au- 
thor's of the study on North Ko- 
rea's current energy situation, said 
that Pyongyang was having diffi- 
culty finding the hard currency to 
pay for oil imports and that China 
preferred to sell to Japan, which 
paid a higher price. 

If Tokyo, as part of a program of 
phased sanctions being developed 
with the United States, took action 
to curtail hard-currency remit- 
tances to the North by pro- Pyong- 
yang Koreans living in Japan, it 
would make oil imports even more 
difficult unless Beijing was pre- 
pared to ease payment terms and 
increase the flow.' 

Japanese officials estimate that 
the bard-currency transfers are 
worth at least $600 million a year. 
North Korea has repeatedly said it 
would regard any sanctions as an 
act of war. 


INFLATION: Alarm Over Rates 


Continued from Page 1 

missed. The same budget concern 
exists in Britain, where Prime Min- 
ister John Major has become so 
unpopular that his government 
may introduce tax cuts over the 
next year or so in order to win 
electoral support 
“All of these factors account for 
(he surprisingly sharp rise in bond 
yields at a very early stage of eco- 
nQtgic : recovery" said Brendan 

w in Lon - " 

; don. 

! George Magnus, on economist at 
S.G. Warburg Securities Ltd. in 
, London, predicts that in 1995 and 
1996 “we will probably see infla- 
tion among major industrialized 
countries peaking at 3 to 5 percent, 
a bit lower in Germany and France, 
a bit higher in Britain, the United 
States, Italy and Spain-", 

He notes, however, that in trying 
to vanquish inflati on fears the poli- 
ticians are addressing only pan of 
the problem. • . 

Among other reasons why long- 
term yields are staying high is the 
expanding worldwide demand for 
capital. This, combined with ibe 
Structural problem of large Europe- 
an government deficits, means that 
bond investors have built what Mr. 
Magnus calls a “risk premium” 

; into the long-term interest rate. 


Greenland Getting a Bishop 

The Associated Press 

COPENHAGEN — Greenland 
■ is gettmgits first bishop in more 
' than 600 years, the island’s govern- 
ment office said Wednesday. Kris- 
’ Uan Morch, the Lutheran vice bish- 
op in the Greenland capital, Nuuk, 
is to be promoted Sunday. The ap- 
. pomtment was in response to 
Greenland's growing independence 
fitim Denmark. 


Alison Cottrell, an economist at 
Midland Global Markets Research 
in London, noted two more reasons 
why yields are so high in Europe; 

• Many investors are staying out 
of what they consider an overly 
volatile markeL 

• Europeans are worried that 
U.S. inflation could still prove a 
problem that will spread across the 
Atlantic. 

Ms. Coiti&said fijai in i he wake 
rof-foLffTBCWSSfe in -U.S. mierest 
rates by the Federal Reserve, aimed 
at squelching any nascent inflation, 
some Europeans were reasoning ' 
that “where the U.S. goes, everyone 
else follows." 

■ Investments Lead ILS. 

The economic recovery in the 
United States is now established on 
the basis of investment and low 
inflation, said Lawrence H. Sum- 
mers. the American Treasury un- 
dersecretary for international af- 
fairs, Bloomberg Business News 
reported Wednesday from Bonn. 

“The U.S. recovery has been hes- 
itant, now it is established," Mr. 
Summers said. He said it was the 
first time since the 1960s that tire 
United States enjoyed an invest- 
ment-led recovery based on low in- 
flation. “It's the first recovery that 
combines the two” since that lime, 
be said. 

Mr. Summers also said that the 
recent rise in long-term interest 
rales in the United States and Eu- 
rope was a consequence of econom- 
ic strength, rather than a threat to 
recovery. \ 

"The increase in long-tom inter- 
est rates in Lbe U.S. and Europe has 
to do with evidence that growth is 
more rapid than expected?* he said. 
Some “elements of speculative dy- 
namics” also contributed to the rise 
in long-term rates, he added. 


KOREA: 

Offer by Carter 

Continued from Page 1 

minute drill. Traffic was stopped 
on the nearby highway. Drivers got 
out, chatted with each other, 
smoked. They looked bored. They 
did not look like people who expect 
imminent war. 

Ten minutes after Lbe drill stori- 
ed, the sirens rang again, traffic was 
instantly clogged again, and life 
was back to normal. 

In Tokyo, press reports said that 
the Japanese government supports 
the phased sanctions against North 
Korea proposed in a draft plan 
prepared in Washington. 

Tbe reports also said that, if the 
sanctions move to a more acute 
stage, Japan would be willing to 
block cash transfers from Japanese 
citizens to North Korea. Such 
transfers are legal now, and are an 
important source of money for the 
Pyongyang regime. 

The United Stales began circu- 
lating the draft proposal on 
Wednesday at the United Nations 
in New York. 

Foreign Minister Kojo Ka- 
kiiawa of Japan said Wednesday 
Us government, would support the 
UiL draft resolution calling for 
sanctions against North Korea. 

The draft is “phased and dose to 
Japan’s idea as a whole,” Mr. Ka- 
kizawa said after a meeting with 
Prime Minister Tsulomu Ha la and 
other senior government officials, 
"We will accept it in principle." 
the foreign minister said. 

According to U.S. diplomats at 
the United Nations, tbe draft reso- 
lution calls for a mandatory arras 
embargo, a cutoff of UN' assis- 
tance, a ban on scientific and tech- 
nical cooperation and the reduc- 
tion of diplomatic ties. 

The diplomats said there would 
be a 30-day grace period after the 
measures were adopted and before 
they took effect. The resolution 
also threatens a second stage cut- 
ting off all Financial transactions. 
Hut is where Japan's role would 
become critical. 

As Mr. Carter arrived in the 
North, Radio Pyongyang quoted 
Defense Minister O Jin U taking an 
uncompromising line by saying his 
countiy would no longer accept 
any kind of nuclear inspection 
railing the step a “self-defensive 
one. 

North Korea declared Monday 
that it was withdrawing from the 
United Nations nuclear watchdog 
group, the International Atomic 
Energy Agency, rather than submit 
to further checks. 

But a senior U.S. official said 
Wednesday that North Korea ap- 
parently was letting international 
inspectors cany oat routine moni- 
toring at its Yongbvon nuclear 
plant, despite its announced with- 
drawal from tbe agency. 

(IIP. Rearers, AFPl 



AhdcUot Vmn Agencr Fnaxr-Pnrw 

Government mih'tiamefl escorting a group of children in Kigali, the Rwandan capital, on Wednesday after tbe cease-fire was announced. 

Backing for Truce Fails to Halt Rwanda Strife 


Compiled fa- Our Staff From Dispatches 

KIGALI. Rwanda — Rwanda's interim 
president and a rebel leader promised Wednes- 
day to accept an African-brokered cease-fire, 
but their troops still fought for control of Kiga- 
li. the capital. 

The fighting in the capital Wednesday was 
heavier than it had been io the previous two 
days. 

“Heavy mortars and small arms fire have 
rocked the city since dawn." said Brigadier 
General Henry Anyidoho. the deputy com- 
mander of the United Nations peacekeeping 
force in Rwanda. 

The agreement covered an end to massacres 


and genocide and the release of hostages, as 
well as a cessation of hostilities in the civil war. 

It also reaffirmed the validity of the 1993 
peace accord on Rwanda’s political future. 
That pact, signed in Arusha. Tanzania, in Janu- 
ary 1993, was never carried out. It was swept 
aside by tbe latest cycle of tribal violence, which 
began after the death of Rwanda's president in 
a plane crash on April 6. 

At the closing session of the Organization of 
African Unity summit meeting in Tunis on 
Wednesday, President Zine Abidine ben Ali of 
Tunisia announced an immediate cease-fire 
agreement between the rebel Rwanda Patriotic 


Front and the provisional Rwandan govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Ben Ali said the Rwandan conflict, in 
which up to half a million people have been 
slaughtered, could be halted only through “dia- 
logue and negotiation.” 

On Tuesday, before the cease-fire agreement 
was reached, 60 teenage boys from the Tutsi 
minority were killed by Hutus in Kigali 

Hutu militiamen loyal to the government 
abducted the boys from a church complex and 
butchered them, a LtN official said. 

Political analysts said the massacre could 
wreck the Tunis accord before it could take 
effect. (Reuters, AFP I 


Muslims 
In Bosnia 
Clash With 
Renegades 

Reuim 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herzegovi- 
na — Muslim-led Bosnian govern- 
ment troops are battling break- 

2 Muslim forces in a northwest 
ve, a United Nations spokes- 
man said Wednesday. 

It was feared that the clashes 
could undermine a temporary 
cease-fire that has slowed fighting 
elsewhere across Bosnia. 

The Bosnian Army pressed 
ahead Tuesday with ah offensive 
against rebel soldiers loyal to the 
breakaway Muslim leader, Fikrei 
Abdic, in the Bihac enclave, the 
UN peacekeeping force said. 

A UN spokesman. Commander 
Eric Chaperon, said in Sarajevo 
that there was heavy fighting in the 
area, especially south of the town 
of Pecigrad. 

The Bosnian Army has gained 
ground against Abdic forces in the 
past few days. Local radio reported 
both sides had suffered substantial 
casualties. 

Mr. Abdic, under pressure from 
the advancing troops, has arrested 
at least 500 men he suspects of 
disloyalty, an aid agency source 
said. 

The report, by a worker whose 
agency is active m Bihac, could not 
be immediately confirmed. 

Fighting inside the Bihac pocket 
began Saturday, the day after the 
monthlong truce, which Mr. Abdic 
did not sign, came into effect 
Mr. Abdic split with the Bosnian 
government last summer over his 
willingness to negotiate with the 
Serbs. 

Apart from the fighting between 
the Muslims. UN peacekeeping of- 
ficials in Sarajevo say the cease-fire 
has proved largely successful, with 
only sporadic clashes reported be- 
tween Serbian and Bosnian Army 
forces. 


SSve- EUROPE; Dehaene's Candidacy Fades , Throwing EU Race Wide Open Cab Calloway Very in 

After Suffering Stroke 


Continued from Page 1 

lead of Paris and Bonn, officials 
say. But they added that deepening 
divisions over the Unions fulure. 
which were highlighted by the gains 
of ami-EU nationalist parties in 
Sunday’s parliamentary elections, 
were making it more difficult to 
achieve a consensus on Mr. De- 
haene. the most fervent supporter 
of deeper EU integration. 

The lack of a power broker is 
also an obstacle. Normally, that 
role would fall to Prime Minister 
.Andreas Papandreou of Greece — 


Athens curTeniJy holds the EU 
presidency — but frail health has 
presented him from making the 
presummit tour of capitals that 
seals the agenda. 

His stand-in. European Affairs 
Minister Theodores Pangalos, 
packs so little weight diplomatical- 
ly that he has not been able to see 
President Francis Mitterrand or 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl. 

Mr. Pangalos met with Mr, Lub- 
bers in The Hague on Wednesday 
bul said, “Greece does not know 
yet who the best choice is." 


EU sources say the outcome 
hinges largely on Mr. Lubbers's 
end game, even if he himself ap- 
pears unlikely to win the job, and 
on the attitude of Mr. Berlusconi, 
who remains a mystery to his fellow 
EU leaders. 

French officials do not disguise 
their mistrust of Mr. Lubbers for 
having conceded so many opt-outs 
from EU policy to Britain in nego- 
tiations over the Maastrict Treaty 
on European Union. 

In Bonn, officials say Mr. Kohl 
has not forgiven Mr. Lubbers for 


failing to give dear, early support 
for German unification. 

But Mr. Lubbers has united his 
country behind him by declaring 
that the interests of the Nether- 
lands, and all small EU countries, 
were at stake in his candidacy. As 
one of tbe 12 leaders who will be at 
Corfu, Mr. Lubbers has veto pow- 
er, and he shows no sign yet of 
backing down. Indeed, a spokes- 
man said Mr. Lubbers was encour- 
aged that Mr. Mitterrand pledged 
not to block him if he won a major- 
ity of EU members. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Cab Calloway, 
the scat-singing big band legend, 
was in intensive care Wednesday 
after suffering a stroke. 

Mr. Calloway, 86, was stricken 
Sunday at his suburban New York 
home." His wife said that doctors 
described his condition as very seri- 
ous. 

Mr. Calloway made his name as 
a bandleader in the 1930s with his 
signature song. “Minnie the 
Moocher." 


SANCTIONS: A Grace Period 

Confirmed from Page 1 


hers of the Security Council: 
France, Britain. Russia and China. 

An American official said Wash- 
ington had “good reason" to expect 
that China, a long-standing ally of 
North Korea, would abstain from 
vetoing the proposal, but other of- 
ficials said Beijing had not provid- 
ed any promise to let the punitive 
measure go forward 

“We’ve done everything we can 
to push in the direction" of gaining 
Chinese support, a senior Ameri- 
can official said. 

Seeking to defend the proposal 
against any criticism that it lets 
North Korea off too lightly for its 
intransigence, the official added, 
“The game here is not to say, ‘Ha, 
look whal I did,' but to get them to 
comply." 

The official said the proposal 
was deliberately drafted to bold the 
toughest potential sanctions in re- 
serve. 

In addition to an arms embargo, 
the first-stage sanctions would in- 
dude these steps: 

• A cutoff of all technical and 
scientific cooperation that could 
contribute to North Korea's nucle- 
ar knowledge. 


• Ao end to all economic assis- 
tance from the United Nations and 
its agencies. 

• A reduction in the size and 
scope of all diplomatic representa- 
tion, both bilaterally and through 
the United Nations. 

• A reduction in cultural scien- 
tific. cultural and educational ex- 
changes 

After an unsuccessful, lb-month 
effort to persuade North Korea to 
comply with its 1992 promise of 
unfettered atomic agency access to 
its nuclear-related sites, the admin- 
istration was moved to draft ibe 
sanctions proposal by North Ko- 
rea’s abrupt withdrawal last month 
of spent fijel rod* from a nuclear 
reactor at its Yongbyoa complex. 

The Clinton administration 
claims that the fuel rods contain 
sufficient plutonium for North Ko- 
rea to make four to five nuclear 
bombs, a development it says 
would undermine the region’s secu- 
rity and pose a serious threat to 
37,000 U.S. troops in South Korea. 

These bombs would be added to 
the one to two such weapons North 
Korea is suspected of completing 
using plutoniuro-laden fuel rods 
withdrawn from the reactor in 
1989. 


SAIPAN: The Other D-Day 50 Years Ago, a Turning Point in the Pacific 


■■■' Continued front Page 1 
preme Court. “You don't ask them 
to (bank those people who brought 
the war here." 

“We were caught in the middle 
of a war we were igr warn about," 
satf AbelOtopaLag vemroentof-’ 
ficiai who was 10 yiers old when 
the . Marines landed He and his 
‘ parents took refuge .n a cave for 
_more than a. week with 30 other 
families, he said. When they 
emerged, they wore loincloths and 
hdd up crosses so they would not 
. be mistaken for Japanese; . , 

“We were anxious to get out of 
thattemMe misery in the caves," 

he said. "We were so glad when the 

Marines came.” 

TakftftTT Wa one of thousands 
of Japanese. who visi. shrines and 
memorials on Saipan every year, 
was kssiiappy to see tbe Marines. 
That a ITr-year-dd Saipan- born ci- 
vilian employee of Japan's South 
-Seas Deraopment Col, he was cap- 
tured and, wrthjco-workcrs, put in a 


The battle actually began June 
11, four days before the invasion, 
when a U.S. naval task force of 
more than 500 ships and 900 carri- 
er-based planes started pounding 
Sail 


“IstiUhdievedsomerelief array 
would come to help us," Mr. Toma 
recaUed :at a ceremony to honor 
wfiajgaeswho died ‘All the Japa- 
n*$e befieved tbe Americans were 
<fevils at iiiat time." 


WiBVish Romania 

Tteuien 

• : ; WtyjtEST — Resident Va- 
cmRavd'of the Czech Republic 
v/u£visit Rfim fluj a next week for 
i on niescu. the 

. said Wednesday. 

V 1 'c '* t 


Ice Admiral Cbuicbi Naguraa 
the Japanese naval commander on 
Saipan who had commanded the 
Japanese fleet in the attack on 
Pearl Harbor, wired a desperate 
message to Tokyo: “Hefl is upon 
us." He and the army commander 
on Saipan, Major General Yoshit- 
sugu Saito, were left to defend die 
island with 31,600 personnel. 

On D-Day, the 2d and 4th Mar 
tine divisions began hitting Sai- 
pan's southwestern beaches under 
heavy Japanese artillery and ma- 
chine-gun fire. Some 8,000 Marines 
landed within the first 20 minutes. 
By day's end, the Americans had 
swaiTwt a beachhead 10,000 yards 
long and more than 1,000 yards 
deep, at a cost of more than 2000 

casualties. 

Japan dispatched a powerful na- 
val strike force to Saipan, but it was 
intercepted by units of the 800-ship 
5th Fleet. In a two-day battle, 
American pilots shot down more 
than 400 planes. Deprived of air 
ayver, two 30, 000- ion Japanese car- 
riers were sunk, and tbe fate of 
Saipan was sealed. 

fit his orders for a final suicidal 
counterattack on July 7. General 
gaiio commanded his men to kill 
seven Americans each. AT the spot 
now known as the Last Command 
post. General Saito kneh facing to- 
ward home, shouted “Long live 0 k 
emperor!” and plunged his sword 


into his body as an aide shot him in 
the bead. Admiral Nagumo also 
took his own life. 

What followed shocked the most 
battle-hardened Marines. Entire 
families of Japanese, terrified by 
their leaders' warnings that the 
Americans would torture and skin 
them alive, rape the women and 
roast the babies, committed suicide 
en masse. 

They huddled around grenades 
and blew themselves up or jumped 
to their deaths at Marpi Point from 
the sites now known as Banzai 
Clift which overlooks the rocky 
coastline, and Suicide Cliff, an 80B- 
foot-high (245-meter) outcropping 
inland. Some families lined up in 
order of age, the youngest first, and 
each child was pushed over the 
edge by the next older until the 
oldest was pushed by tbe mother 
and the mother by the father. Then 
tbe father ran over die cliff — back- 
ward, so as not to see his last step. 

For Private Gabaldon. then 18. 
the cliff suicides were the worst 

memories of a brutal campaign. As 
a poor Hispanic child in East Los 
Angeles, he had been taken in for a 
time by a Japanese family. On Sai- 
pan. be put his language skill to use 
as a Marine scout to uy to talk 
Japanese into surrendering. 

Often he could only watch as the 
Japanese plunged to their deaths. 
“1 tried to convince them not to 


Saipan was declared secured on 
July 9, 1944. A small band of 
troops under Captain Sukae Oba 
continued to hold out surrendering 
in December 1945. four months af- 
ter Japan capitulated. 

Tbe Americans paid a high price 
for victory in the 24-da> campaign: 
3,225 dead. 13.061 wounded and 
326 listed as missing. But the Japa- 
nese paid much more dearly. Ac- 
cording to figures compiled by the 
Marianas Visitors Bureau, of the 
31,629 Japanese military personnel 
on the island, about 29.500 died. 

Private Gabaldon. who was 
wounded while searching for Cap- 
tain Oba. received the Navy Cross 
— the navy's second-highest award 
for heroism — for capturing more 
than 1,000 Japanese, some of them 
single-handedly while on one-man 
patrols in enemy territory. He 
talked 800 soldiers and civilians on 
Banzai Cliff into surrendering, and 
he says he killed 33 Japanese sol- 
diers m battle on Saipan and Tini- 
an. 

The invasion of Saipan was fol- 
lowed by the capture of neighbor- 
ing Tinian and the liberation of 
Guam, an island in the Marianas 
chain held by the United Slates 
since 1898 but seized by Japan at 
the time of the attack on Pearl 
Harbor in December l g 4I. 

With Saipan. Tinian and Guam 
under its control, the United States 


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don’t do it! Don’t kill your baby!* invasion of Japan. From bases in 
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Pa^e6 


THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 

OPINION 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



n-BLlMIEn WITH nit XfcW VUUK TIXlkR AM* THE WASHINGTON PUNT 


Rwandans in Distress 


SribuU t Resist North Korea With Armed Force if Necessary 

i THE WASHINGTON PCIKT r ■ ' V " 


Shameful Dawdling 

One can stipulate that the United State:* has 
no vital interests or historical ties in Rwanda 
that might justify sending troops to that tor- 
mented country. That said, (he Clinton ad- 
ministration chose an awful time to delay 
logistical aid to United Nations peacekeepers, 
and q worse time to apply a semantic sponge 
to crimes against humanity. 

Just the other day. President Bill Clinton was 
in France summoning the memories of a jusi 
war against a gen od dal foe. Meantime the 
appalling butchery continues in Rwanda, 
where rebel militias last week slaughtered three 
Catholic bishops. The worth of a cease-fire 
agreement announced on Tuesday remains to 
be tested. Yet a paralyzed Rmtagen quibbles 
over nickels and dimes instead of nishing U.S. 
armored vehicles to the first elements or a 
projected force of 5,500 UN peacekeepers. 

The bill to the United Nations for this 
logistical aid is 5 °. 5 million, with delivery 
costs reckoned at about $6 million: the Unit- 
ed Nations is also being charged a leasing fee 
of 5375,000 for the 50 M- 1 1 3 armored person- 
nel carriers. Defense officials insist (hat the 

Flush With Weapons 

The death toll in Rwanda would have been 
horrendous enough ir weaponry had been 
limited to local arms of choice — machetes 
and clubs. But imports of small arms, machine 
guns, mortars, artillery pieces and military 
vehicles have helped push the estimated toll 
toward a half-million and counting. A month 
ago the UN Security Council, to interdict 
resupply, pronounced a general arms embar- 
go. But the United Nations commander on 
the ground now says: ‘'The horror show con- 
tinues. Both sides still have resources and a 
capability io fight on." 

A new phase in the old business of arms 
sales has come into being with the post -Cold 
War proliferation of ethnic and tribal con- 
flicts within countries. The resulting ami* 
demand has tempted suppliers around an 
ostensibly more peaceful world to keep their 
defense industries running and profitable. 

Sooner or later, you would think, poorer 
buyers run up against their credit limits. But 
what is for a big country a trivial budget of a 
few million dollars can keep a small country 
flush with weapons. 

This is how the killer Hutu government of 
Rwanda has received arms or advice from its 
longtime military' patron France, from Egypt, 
whose rocket launchers are currently pound- 


vehides cannot be flown from Frankfurt in 
Germany io Entebbe in Uganda until the 
lease agreement is concluded by the United 
Nations. The green-eyeshade brigade is 
doubtless right but this is not a routine anus 
transaction: it is a response to a h umani tarian 
disaster. Blame for not slashing through this 
red tape rests with the White House and (he 
National Security Council. This ha gglin g over 
leasing arrangements is being perpetrated by 
the United Nations' leading deadbeat — the 
United States owes nearly 52 billion in treaty- 
mandated dues and assessments. 

What adds a truly dismaying flavor to this 
miserable affair is the administration's simul- 
taneous admonition to its officials to avoid 
describing the massacres in Rwanda as geno- 
cide. Instead, spokesmen have been instructed 
to say that “acts of genocide may have oc- 
curred." This dainty euphemism flies in the 
face of daily reports of ethnic killings that can 
only be called genocidaL What really seems to 
worry' (he Clinton (earn is that talk of geno- 
cide may increase clamor for doiog more to 
stop iu especially since the United States is a 
party lo the Genocide Convention. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES 


ing Kigali, and from the old South Africa. The 
new South Africa's president. Nelson Man- 
dela. sees “nothing wrong" with selling arms 
for defense, and promises that his country’s 
exports won't get into the “wTong hands." 

"Merchants of death" are an easy target, 
and sometimes a fair one. .Arms sales to rogue 
states, ones that flout the international rales, 
must be aggressively limited, and some coun- 
tries are just plain overarmed. Bui otherwise 
(he target has to be narrowed. Measured sell- 
ing to states whose sovereignty and security 
ore at risk from across a border needs to be 
distinguished from profligate selling to rogue 
states or vengeful elements creating bloody 
disorder and mass death. Arms sales ought to 
be registered in a public place, national or 
international, to permit outside review. 

The United Stales is a secure and powerful 
state with a long record of exporting arms to 
dubious governments and into conflict-prone 
regions for reasons of its own. It is poorly 
placed to preach a gospel of restraint But as a 
leading global actor, the United Stales is well 
placed to demonstrate some restraint: to deny 
and police sales to the rogue states, to reward 
with more aid countries that reduce military' 
spending, to extend transparency and to sup- 
port the linkage of arms sales to the resolution 
of the disputes they sometimes feed. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Lubaviteh Bloc 


The worldwide Lubaviteh Hasidic move- 
ment lost a beloved leader on Sunday when 
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson died ai 
the age of 92. Rabbi Schneerson was both a 
unifying and a divisive figure, charismatic and 
mysterious. Sometimes criticized for allowing 
himself to become ibe center of a cull of 
personality, (he man known as the rebbe was 
nonetheless respected for molding a small 
religious sect into a powerful movement with 
political influence from Eastern Parkway in 
New York City to Jerusalem. In recent years, 
the debate about whether he was the messiah 
overshadowed his accomplishments. 

. His life spanned a turbulent century, a lime 
that brought suffering and rebirth to world 
Jewry. According to Lubaviteh lore. Rabbi 
Schneerson was born on April 14, 1*102, in 
Ukraine, studied mathematics and science in 
Berlin and ai the Sorbonne. fled the Nazis in 
1941 and immigrated to the United States. 


Once settled in New York, he ret out to revive 
the Lubaviteh movement, which had nearly 
perished in the Holocaust The Lubavitchers 
say they now number 200.000 worldwide out 
of 17 million Jews, and 30.000 in New York 
City out of 800.000 Jewish New Yorkers. Other 
estimates are significantly lower, making his 
movement’s influence even more remarkable. 
The formula was simple: by voting as a bloc, 
in Israel or New York City, the Lubavitchers 
became a force to be reckoned with. 

The rabbi and his followers remain contro- 
versial. especially among some Reform and 
Conservative Jews who considered him overly 
zealous and intolerant of their less orthodox 
beliefs. But even critics respected him for 
what he built: a religious movement so far- 
flung and fervent that there are few places left 
in the world where one will not find at least a 
tiny Lubaviteh Hasidic community. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES 


Other Comment 

Pyongyang Can't Be Ignored The Left Has an Edge 


Day by day the crisis caused by North Ko- 
rea's nucicar weapons program puts the United 
Stales in a lighter bind. For half a century. 
Washington has led the international effort to 
prevent the spread of atomic arm.'*. When 
North Korea signed the Nuclear N ^prolifera- 
tion Treaty and then rejected its rules, it was jn 
affront lo international order that the onl> 
remaining superpower could not ignore. Hence 
the U.S. drive for United Nations economic 
sanctions against the Pyongyang regime a> *ell 
as veiled hints or military acuon. 

The nuclear threat is cause for tough mea- 
sures to prevent a precedent that could en- 
courage other rogue regime-* to pursue weap- 
ons or mass destruction. Despite these huge 
stakes, the United Slates finds itself inhibited 
by the concerns of North Korea's neighbors: 
China. Japan and South Korea. Their worries 
about a nuclear North Korea are real enough, 
but their dread of a war that could bring 
regional destruction is even greater. 

America cannot walk away from the en*i». 
The situation demands international punish- 
ment if North Korea remains recalcitrant. 
But as nearby Asian nations assert their 
growing influence. Washington should also 
prepare for funher negotiations «.uh Pyong- 
yang, perhaps at the kind of regjon.il confer- 
ence suggested by Russia. 

— The Baltimore Sun 


Left-of-cenier parties have two decisive ad- 
vantages over their conservative counterparts. 
First they can more readily attack certain 
sons of privilege. In iwny countries, the fierc- 
est opponents of change are those who have 
traditionally benefited from the restrictive 
practices established over the years by the 
middle-class professions: doctors, accoun- 
tants. lawyers and so forth. The left may be 
less willing than the right to defer to such 
interests. Second, the left’s motives in reform 
are less in doubt. As a result, as “socialist" 
governments in Australia and New- Zealand 
have shown, leftist reformers can often be 
more radical than right-of-center govern- 
ments in pursuit of efficiency, as well as 
in pursuit of equity. 

A policy to equip the unemployed for work 
costs a lot: more, often, than it costs to keep 
failing industries afloat. However, measures 
that improve training opportunities Tor the 
unemployed make better sense than measures 
to defend u dying firm. They speed the cre- 
ation of jobs i.t the right industries, promoting 
growi h across the economy as a whole. 

Welfare reform is even more difficult It is 
costly and complicated to help the poor w ith- 
out worsening the poverty trap. A Icft-of- 
center party should nonetheless be ambitious 
in both these jreas. 

— The Economist f London). 




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W ASHINGTON — This month North 
Korea deliberately destroyed the infor- 
mation that the International Atomic Energy 
Agency needed to analyze fud rods that 
Pyongyang had removed without appropri- 
ate IAEA supervision, from its 25 megawatt 
reactor. As a result of this latest North Kore- 
an defiance of obligations under the Nonpros 
ilferatioo Treaty, we may never know with 
confidence whether it already has enough plu- 
tonium to make one or two nuclear weapons. 

Now- an even larger problem looms. Those 
fuel rods, which currently are in cooling 
ponds, contain enough plutonium to make 
four lo six nuclear weapons. In less than three 
months they can be moved to North Korea's 
reprocessing facility, at which the plutonium 
is separated from spent fud. That "repro- 
cessing" could take perhaps another three 
months. That means that by the end of this 
year North Korea could have enough fission- 
able material for up to eight nuclear weapons. 
We must not let that happen. 

A hostile North Korea armed with a grow- 
ing nuclear arsenal already flighi-iesLipg mis- 
siles that can reach Japan, and poised to 
export nuclear capabilities to countries such 
as Iran and Libya — this would pose an 
unacceptable threat to vital U.S. interests. It 
could substantially increase the risks facing 
South Korea and the 37.000 U.S. military 
personnel stationed there, undermine siabii- 

It is hard to imagine that 
* phased * economic sanctions 
could he effective in time. 

ity throughout East Asia, fuel a regional nu- 
clear arms race and jeopardize the future of 
the Nonproliferation Treaty. 

What to do? It is apparent that the United 
States cannot rely solely on IAEA safeguards 
to block North Korea’s reprocessing of its 
spent fuek North Korea has repeatedly dem- 
onstrated that it will flout its treaty obliga- 
tions whenever it believes h serves Its inter- 
ests. Pyongyang's announcement on Monday 
that it is withdrawing from the IAEA almost 
surely is intended as a warning that it is on 
the brink of pulling out of the'treaty. expel- 
ling the IAEA inspectors and removing the 
IAEA’s cameras and other safeguards. 

Pyongyang may believe that a perfect time 
to take this step would be when the fuel rods 
have cooled and are ready for reprocessing, 
and that Washington's threat to impose 
sanctions Mould be the perfect pretext. As 
things now stand, if Pyongyang implement- 
ed such a maneuver, the world might never 
know whether it had gone ahead and repro- 
cessed enough plutonium for another four to 
six nuclear weapons. 

It is hard to imagine that the “phased" 
economic sanctions being proposed by the 
United States, if and when tney are imposed, 
could possibly be effective in time to slow or 
halt possible North Korean reprocessing plans. 
The lime has come for more decisive action. 

Specifically, the United States must make 
dear that whether North Korea remains in or 
withdraws from the Nonproliferation Treaty. 
America will not permit it to reprocess its 
spent fueL Washington should tdl Pyongyang 
that it either must permit continuous, unfet- 
tered IAEA monitoring to confirm that no 


By Brent Scoweroft and Arnold Kanter 


further reprocessing is taking place, or Ameri- 
ca will remove its capacity to reprocess. 

in this connection, it should be noted that, 
aside from possible midear waste tanks, no 
nuclear material would be present in the re- 
processing facility until the fuel rods were 
transferred from the cooling ponds. This 
means that the timely destruction of the re- 
processing facility could entail far less risk of 
spreading radioactivity than would an attack 

on a nuclear reactor. 

This approach is not intended to be provo- 
cative. On the contrary, it is designed to 
address the very real prospect that a single 
future act of North Korean defiance could 
make the already serious North Korean nu- 
clear problem very much worse. The potential 
military action, if required, is intentionally 
quite /united and consciously designed to 
minimrag the risks of unintentional damage. 

It is worth re-emphasizing that the objec- 


tives of the proposed “no more reprocessing" 
policy also are limited. The approach we oat- 
line is designed to prevent a bad problem from 
becoming worse. By itsdf, it cannot deal with., 
the one or two nuclear weapons that North'. 

stated Sjgnessto ose nnKtaryforce ifnects- 
sary should send Pyongyang an unmistakable 
signal of US. determination to resolve past - 
North Korean nuclear transgressions as wrfl as 

to preclude future nuclear threats. 

The policy is not risk-free. Some believe 
that any use of military force against North 
Korea could precipitate an attack against the 
South and launch a second Korean War. - 
North Korea has threatened that just , the 
imposition of economic sanctions could pro- 
voke a North Korean military response. It 
therefore is imperative that America step up 
efforts to strengthen U.S. and South Korean' 
defensive military capabilities. Such a build- 


up would improve the ability J, 0 ^vu!d 
say North Korean- at®* ^ **> * lUl 
reassure Seoul arid Tokyo. 

- More gaorelly, Wnahh|K»n^^“ r ' 

that its actions and words ^Jf-lSShy 
Pyongyang that it will not be , 

tffS wiBnot be paralyzed 
Miry of war. On the: contrary. 
must be made to understand that u 
unavoidable, the United States wmiid 
fight it sooner than later, when North 
.might have a sizable nuclear arsenal, ukc 
wise, it must understand that if w^r 
will result in the total defeat of North Korea 
and the demise of the. Kirn U Sung regime. 

' The stakes could hardly be higher. The tune 

- for temporizing is over. 

Mr. Scoweroft was national security 
to Presidents Gerald Ford and George Bush. 
Mr Kanter was hi the State Department w the 
Bush admimstmiion. . They contributed this 
comment to The' Washington Post. ' 


But 


P ARIS — I presume I am not the only 
person having difficulty understanding 
why North Korea and the nuclear bomb have 
become the issue of the hour and the Wash- 
ington press and political establishment's lat- 
est test of President Bill Clinton's “resolve." 

The North Koreans appear to have given 
themselves the necessary plutonium to make a 
nuclear bomb, but they are generally acknow- 
ledged to be far from actually making one. 
Acoxxiing lo credible analysis, they also do not 
possess the long-distance missile delivery sys- 
tem to use it strategically, nor has anybody yet 
provided a plausible scenario of how they 
could exploit its possession to positive gain. 

The principal lesson of SO years in the 
nuclear age is that deterrence functions. The 
United States and the Soviet Union bent 



By William Pfafi 

some of their better minds throughout that 
half-century to finding some way to make' 
positive use of the bomb. The best they could . 
do was elaborate wavs ity which one ride 
blocked the use of the bomb bv the other side 
in what both recognized would in any case be. 
mutual catastrophe. 

Ah, yes, say those impassioned by this . 
issue, but what about Irrational leaders: mad- 
men, terrorists who do not coant the cost?. 
North Korea supposedly will sell its putative . 
bomb to “rogue regimes ” Iran, Iraq and 
Libya are those usually mentioned. But what 
win rogue regimes then do with these bombs? 

if they put (hem in missiles or airplanes 
and bomb others, they cannot avoid being 
bombed in turn. The motivation of those ; 
rogue leaders with whom we have acquaint- 
ance has been to survive in power —as is the 
ambition of Kim fl Sung today. 

One can invent scenarios by which rogues' 
and terrorists plant their atomic bombs anon- 
ymously in parked cars under the World 
Trade Center or along side Buckingham Palace 
and then blackmail governments. However, 
terrorists determined to do that heed not wait 
another decade or so for Kim D Sung’s bomb. 


And if .Nccth Korea is indeed manufactur- 
ing nuclear devices, 'what is anybody going to 
do about it, other than impose new sanctions, 
which the Korean regime will ignore? Bombing 
would appear to risk the explosions and fallout 
fhai the jmerventioD would be meant to pre- 
vent Ad American public unprepared to pul 
soldiers bn the ground in Bosxua or Rwanda is 
not gong to approve an invaskm of North 
Korea to seize that cribntiy’s weaponry. • 

And Anall y, why is. this Washington's ob- 
Jsesrion .when, the countries adjoining North 
Korea are not themselves willing, to do more? 
IT Sou* Korea, China (North Korea’sprinci- 
pal source of fuel) and Japan are willing to 
live with the present atuatwri, tit prefer their 
own methods for dealing with the threat, why 
should Washington insist on taking the mat- 
ter in to its- own hands? 

T do not argue that the world would not be 
a worse place shod! d North ' Korea ^possess 
nodear weapons. If there were something 
simple amT sensible to do about die problem. 
I would amee it should b& done. But ineffec- 
tual ganctlrwig, uvrfht f<K threats and The pre- 
sent media uproar invite realization of the 
.real risk, wiridi'is that of non-nuclear war.cn 
the Korcan Peninsnla, involving (he. American 
troops now stationed in Sooth Korea ^from the 
-day it begins. Anyone who. remembers what 


Plenty of finished — not hypothetical — ■ conventional war in Korea was like the last 


weaponry is adrift in the ex-co mmunis t . . -time is unlikdy lo want logo through it again, 
countries right now. Nothing that the United • . ; .It is a curious-feature of Lite in 'Washington 
States or anyone else does today, to North thmobscsrions wilh pahiailarfotttgn villain- 
Koiea can spare the world tbepossibility-that ies appear and disappear with the regularity 
someone somewhere may make “irrational" of the seasons, often with reasoning that bears 
use of a nuclear weapon, now or later. It;is *• tittle examination, So that one wishes that 
pretense to suggest otherwise. . .- t both the administration arid its critics .took. 

Therefore, what is all this abqnt? For. -a even more Prozac than they do. ^ 
small and beleaguered country, the nuclear If they want a nudear worry “what about 
option inevitably seems the sensible one. Iam ; Chernobyl? The nuclear plant there is deCrep- . 
sure it would make Kim II Sung, the Great it and unstable, the risk of another, nuclear 
Leader, and his son, the Beloved Leader, feel ~~ disaster and fallout a reality, not a scenario . 
much more secure to have the bomb. It would . Western investment and action there could 
not actually make them more secure, howev- preclude disaster at a cost mgnicesunal "by 
er, since age and other events beyond, their comparison with the cost of a conflict with a 
control will terminate thdr dynasty and are Norm Korean regime whose death. of natural 
likely to do so Wdl beforeanyNorth Koneaif^ causes is only araatteref time, r;' .?.•£•' ~.cr 

bomb is tested. They are ihe Ceausescus of an International Herald Tribune. . 

Asia swept by the.siocms of change. . ® Las Angeles Tones SyncBaae— 


In the Philippines, an Asian Success Story With a Difference 


M ANILA — Since the Cold War 
ended. East Asia has emerged 
in the public consciousness as the 
strongest challenge lo the West's con- 
tinued preeminence. The economic 
performances of Nonbeast and 
Southeast Asian countries are fre- 
quemly lumped together and then 
compared to those" of the United 
States and other Western nations. 

Japan leads the Asian pack. Inso- 
far as other Asian economies approx- 
imate its features, they are rated suc- 
cesses. So far it has surmounted every 
challenge to its primacy. Challenges 
that sapped the strength of other 
countries have only made it stronger. 

Those challenges hare included a 
currency that was toe strong, an ex- 
cessive dependence on foreign oiL 
and the hostility of major trading 
partners. As Japan spreads its influ- 
ence beyond its borders through in- 
vestment and trade, its self-reliant 
strength at home has not been dilut- 
ed. despite its current short-term po- 
litical headaches. 


By Jaime Zobel de Ayala 


In “Looking at the Sun," the Ameri- 
can writer James Fallows concludes 
ihai a Japanese-styie partnership bo- 
tween the state and the private sector 
for national progress is the best way to 
succeed. He marvels at bow Japan 
used a kind of economic judo to turn 
what were once seen as the West’s 
defining strengths — private enter- 
prise. free trade and liberal democracy 
— to the disadvantage of the West 

The image of the West has taken a 
beating from comparisons with East 
Asia. The Philippines, often seen as a 
pole imitation of the West, has tints 
also fallen in esteem. Democracy and 
free enterprise are blamed for the 
weak governments, confused societies, 
wayward citizenry and lurching eco- 
nomies of the West, and of the Philip- 
pines. in stark contrast are the strong 
governments, disciplined societies, co- 
operative citizens and smoothly ris- 
ing economies of East Asia. 

The Philippines was the first coun- 


try to shake off colonialism in Asia 
and the first to recover from the rav- 
ages of World War IL It was also the 
first Asian nation to stage a nonviolent 
revolution, setting a pattern of politi- 
cal development throughout Eastern 
Europe that brought the Cold War to 
an end. All this is in the past. Coun- 
tries with economic strategies and po- 
litical systems that are diametrically 
different from those of the Philippines 
are now held up for admiration. 

The Philippines is now restructur- 
ing its economy, in cooperation with 
the World Bank and the Internation- 
al Monetary Fund, to bring ft even 
closer to the Western model of free 
enterprise at home and free trade 
abroad, with the government in- 
volved in government and business in 
business only. The Philippines up- 
holds individual rights at home and 
international law abroad. 

The problem with a democracy is 
that it is a nice place to five In but you 


Let’s Treat Alcohol Like the Drug It Is 


N EW YORK — For some il is a 
beverage, for some a habit, for 
some an addiction. And those differ- 
ences, perhaps more than anything 
else, explain why we hove yet to 
come to terms with the vast damage 
that alcohol can do. with those u 
kills, those il harms, those who can’i 
get loose from its sharp fishhook. 

While even young children know 
that cocaine ar.d heroin are nothing 
but trouble, while even young chil- 
dren know that cigarettes 'cause 
cancer, what they know and learn 
and believe abed; booze and beer 
and wine is different because il Is 
the drug their parents keep in the 
refrigerator and use themselves. 
And that can be confusing. 

. The Center on Addiction and 
Substance Abuse at Columbia Uni- 
versity quantified some of the re- 
sults of that confusion last week. A 
commission report show* ihai 
"binge drinking is the number one 
substance abuse problem in Ameri- 
can college life. - far oulweigliina 
the use ai drugs. The widespread 
use of alcohol at nearly every .Amer- 
ican school affects everything from 
the prevalence of venerea! disease 
to ibe failure rate. 

Ninety percent cf all reported 
campus rapes occur when either the 
victim or the assailant has been 
drinking. Ai ieast one in five college 
students abandons safe sex prac- 
tices when drunk that he or she 
would use when sober. Two-thirds 
of college suicide victims were le- 
gally intoxicated ai the time of 
death. Estimates of alcoholism 
range from 10 to 15 percent of (he 
college population. 

What’s wrong with tins picture? 


By Anna Quindlen 

These statistics would normally be 
the stuff oT vocal lobbies, calls for 
action and regulation. Instead alco- 
hol manufacturers openly court the 
college market, advertising in cam- 
pus newspapers despite die fact 
that many of the readers are too 
young to drink legally. 

In a I*J9l report on akobd pro- 
motion on campus, a marketing ex- 
ecutive was quoted on the impor- 
tance of brand loyalty in a student. 
“If he turns out to be a big drinker, 
the beer company has bought itself 
an annuity." the executive said. 

“When’ parents visit, their con- 
cern is drugs," said one college ad- 
ministrator. “They’re surprised if 
we want to talk about drinking. A 
few are even annoyed.” 

The demonizaci'on of drugs al- 
lows delusion about alcohol to 
flourish. There are 18J million 
Americans with alcohol problems 
and only 5 million drtlg addicts. 
More people who commit crimes 
are drank than high. Illicit drag use 
on campus has decreased 60 per- 
cent in the lost decade Beer is ibe 
dope of the quad. 

Colleges and uitiverarties are cau- 
tious in confronting alcohol use on 
ampus: if they accept responsibil- 
ity for policing it, administrators 
are concerned that they will be held 
legally responsible for. its effects. 

For many parents, the legality. of 
alcohol is a convenient accuse not to 
delve too deeply into the isstBS it 
raises for tbar kids, issues not only 
about drinking but about self-image. 

Research being done at MiSSS- 


sippi State University showed that 
many students drank to escape 
from anger and loneliness, to feel 
acceptea and at ease. College au- 
thorities and parents both have to 
find some w ay to communicate that 
using alcohol to anesthetize doubt 
and insecurity can become a fife- 
long habit as fast as you can say 
AA. And that way lies disaster, dis- 
appointment, even death. 

The other day Betty Ford came 
with her daughter, Susan, to a sym- 
posium at the Center on Addiction 
and Substance Abuse so that both 
could talk about bow her family 
had to force her into treatment. “I 
suddenly found myself making ex- 
cuses so that I wouldn't have to 
spend too much time over at the 
bouse," Susan said of the time when 
the former first lady was addicted 
to booze and pills. 

Cynthia Gomey, in an exquiale 
essay in The Washington Post last 
year, wrote of her mother. “She was 
a woman of curiosity and learning 
and great inidjjgencc. She died in ■ 
March, of crrrbosis of the liver, 
which is also what kills the men 
under blankets by the sewer grates.” 

But kids won’t even bqjin to un- 
derstand that until everyone starts 
to treat alcohol like what it is: a 


are not sure to eat. The problem with 
a dictatorship, as Filipinos discov- 
ered, is that you are not sure to eat or 
live. The authoritarian experience of 
otbercountries in the region has been 
different They are lucky. But the. 
Philippines has to live and act on the 
basis of its own sad ejgjerienoe. 

The critics are tight: Philippine de- 
mocracy is having a hard time solving 
the problems that a dictatorship cre- 
ated. Half of the nation’s revenues go 
to servicing a huge foreign and do- 
mestic debt inherited from the Mar- 
cos yearn. Democracy is expensive— - 
but it is not a luxury.- For the Philip? 
■pines, it is a necessity. 

Philippine democracy can harcfly 
be described as a failure. Among 
Asian countries, we have solved the 
deadly problem' erf political succes- 
sion without tanks .'in ; the streets 
Communist insurgency '.m' ^the Philip- 
. pines is fast winding down. The liber- • 
al culture, while explaining the indis-. 
ripline of our society, also accounts 
for its extraordinary' tolerance. We 
have no racial problems. 

Philippine solutions are not neat, 
but they involve a sense oLcp mm uni- 
ty and cooperation. The problem of 
policy inconsistency between admin- 
istrations has been solved. Without 
skipping a beat. President Fidel Ra- 
mos took up the essential policies of 
the previous democratically elected 
administration. 

The administration of President 
Corazon Aquino prepared, and . the . 
Ramos government has implement- 
ed, the deregulation of foreign ex- 
change and other measures lo open 
the economy,' ; improve efficiency 
and competition, and strengthen the 
private sector. Mr. Ramos has called 
for stronger English-language in- 
struction and education in basic 
skills to recover or retain the coun- 


try’s fanner advantage in these areas. 
. Thie Philippines ismoving toward 
- economic recovery. Interest rates 
are low. Inflation is in single digits. 
The foreign exchange rate is stable. 
Investments in housing and con- 
struction are rising. .Consumption is 
increasing. There u.. vigorous devel- 
opment in new growth centers such 
as Cebo, ia the central-Philippines. 
and Davao, in . the souths The trou- 
blesome power shortage^ are almost 
. over. The government budget deficit 
is being addressed .with new tax 
measures. Economic growth wQI 
tikdy hit 5' percent this year, after 
adjustment for inflation. 

The Philippines has made its 
choice-^ private free enterprise rath- 
er than the East Asian way .of direct- 
ed economies. Beit, tike the rest of 
Asia, the, PidUppines will leapfrog 
economically where it can, in areas 
where it has comparative' advan tage. 
These indude widespread, literacy, 
corirpetooce in English, and superior 
dolls, even if wages are higher than in 
most of Southeast Asia. 

The Philippines would prefer a 
strong economy built from the 
ground up, complete with heaw in- 
dustry and a thriving agriculture ’ But 
the cbontty will Iraraess growth areas 
wherever they- can be- found. This 
may buy time to acquire the scientific 
and technologica} culture essential to 
real, substantive development 

It is too soon to say that one wav is 
best for all-time, and another a hope- 
less failure. As they say to America, it 
ain’t over until the fat lady sings. And 
she’s not in the. stadium yet. 

The veriter is chairman and presi- 
de™ of Ayala Corporation, one of the 
largest companies in the Philippines 
He contributed this, comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


That can be confusing, too, since 
there are many who can drink with , 
no ill effect and never come close to 
addiction. But just because many of 
us are safe drivers doesn’t mean we 
don’t acknowledge the existence of 
car accidents. And in the lives of 
many young adults, alcohol is an. 
accident waiting to happen. 

The New York Tunes. .... 


IN OUR PACES: 100, 75 AND 50: YEARS AG O 
1894: Made to Celebrate the ™ *J e ^‘y offences — 

contraband, possession of a bicvclp 
LOME — It is said thar after much letter-carrying, etc. For 50fr. a worn 
conomy "King Humbert:, had last . an named Aubert bad five nerwin 
ear 5,000,000 lire pm away to be shot, and when she considered /hxr 
evoted to special festivals on the the Germans took action too slnwl- 
tarriage erf his son. For this leasoiriris she would hurry them with the cwt i 
uention was to have his silver wed confession, “I want the business 
ing quickly, because I need the mon^/^ 

^^ anfcBon,bed 

■iend andlfly, and ail other Great v^? H ?- GT 9 N — [from our N«l- 
Dwas 5eot&8 special., represents- ipnydiliop;] A strong force of th* 
ves.entertairiraaitshadtObt:provid- nughtiea planes — the 

i. money was needed — and the . super- Fortresses of the (j n ;i ~4 

rince of Naples isstfll without a wife. States Army — rained ion* Tr 
... bombs on the JanaaauT J?* of 

919s TVators<m Trial 

ARIS — ilie trial by court-martial . with a sneak attack on Peart u lane d 
T twenty-five Frenchmen and worn- - From the War Depan&em , rl?t,r - 
i of the invaded regions, accused of tion that greeted the • a na ’ 
enouncing -ibeir rdtow-dtaens- to citedjubiknee came ih7s WlUl e *~ 
»GentOTS.'w»ll begin today [June- sentence announcemnWiv ^ Qe " 
5]. Some of tire priso^ are said to super-Fonr esses of rj, l * ‘ B ' 29 
we. gcrfldretr.couflttymai impris- . States Army Air Forces ted 
uftS. ^nd even shot, by ifenoimriag 1 er Command bombed?^ 10 ® omb ’ 


ROME — It is said thar after much 
economy ~King Humbert:, had last 
year 5,000,000 lire pm away to be 
devoted to special' festivals on the 
marriage of his son. For this rcasonlns 
intention was to have his silver wed- 
ding pass without any special celebra- 
tion. However. His Maj'estyof Germa- 
ny e xp ressed his desire to be present . 
with toe Empress to do honor to. fais 
friend and ally; and all other Great 
Powers 5eniz^ special . representa- 
tives. eriieitauinxhtshad toberprovid- 
ed. money was needed — and the 
Prince of Naples is stdl without a wife. 

1919: . IVfBtMs <m Trial 

PARIS — The trial by court-martial . 
or twenty-five Frenchmen and worn- • 
cn of the invaded regions, accuserfof 
denouncing -their felkw-dtizens to 
theGcnuans. will begin today [June - 
1 6J. Some of ^dre prisoners are. said to 
have, got toeir countrymeh imjjris- , 
oned.^andOCT^jotiby ifenouKiog'- 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


Page 7 


OPINION 


Japan Has a Role to Play 
For Peace in the Mideast 


By Koji Kakizawa 

The writer is foreign minister nf Japan. 


,J WWII .•>" 


T P^^^Sht of nxem progress bad an administrative system before. 

, ^wdale East peace process. Neither pany has much time to negoti- 

muen invest has been shown in Juprn’s ale; both have to produce tangible re- 


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i CLEAN HOUSE / - 


A Requiem for Physics in America 




MHERST, Massachusetts — For 
k the past year, ever since the Super* 


By Dick Teresi 


IN Bosnia 


n,. 


rde in the process and in the region as a 
whole. I can assure all those interested in 
the success of this process that Japan har 
been actively engaged and Keenly inter- 
ested in, and remains deeply committed 
to. peace in die Middle East. 


suits, or “peace dividends,” in order to 
farther promote the process in the face of 
opposition. The international community 
has been playuig an increasingly impor- 
tant role in consolidating the efforts of 




I have been involved in the search for 
peace in the Middle East for more ‘bar 
1G years. Japan has been actively sup- 
porting this process from the beginning. 


the negotiating parties and of the co- 
sponsors, the United States and Russia. 


--m\ 


sponsors, the United States and Russia. 

At this juncture, the international com- 
munity has been asked Lo help the Pales- 
tinians administer their autonomous gov- 




H 


the region During the visit, I made dear 
to the regional parties the depth of Ja- 
pan’s support lor the peace process, in- 
doding assist an ce for the Palestinians of 
$200 million over the rwo years beginning 
last October, and bilateral assistance to 
Arab countries that neighbor Israel, in- 
ducting Egypt, Jordan and Syria 
Japan’s humanitarian assistance, 

■ which has been extended to the Chil- 
dren’s Hospital in Egypt, refugee camps 
in Jot dan, emergency medical centers in 

’ Syria and so forth, was welcomed by 
local people in all the nations I visited. 

• When I visited Jericho Hospital to do- 
\ nate emergency medical equipment. 1 

■ was welcomed warmly as the first for- 
; eigu minister to visit the area since Israel 
- and the Palestine Liberation Organ iza- 
' lion signed their historic agreement on 
1 the withdrawal of Israeli forces from the 

■ Gaza Strip and the Jericho area. 

In the context of confidence-building, 

> I urged the Arab parties to end their 
boycott of Israel It is counterproductive 

• in light of die economic agreement be- 

• tween Israel and the PLO, n contradicts 
, the interests of the Arab parties lbem- 
| selves, and it inhibits foreign investment 
i in the region, including that of Japan. 

| All the leaders I talked (o expressed a 
, firm commitment to peacemaking. The 

■ first concrete results of the ongoing 
| peace talks are the withdrawal of Israeli 
< troops from the Gaza Strip and the Jeri- 
: cho area and the establishment of tbe 

• Palestinian interim self-government 


nations, and by promoting mutual confi- 
dence for regional cooperation. 

I believe that the multilateral talks 
have effectively supported the bilateral 
ralfoi They have provided negotiating 
parties with the opportunity for confi- 


dence-building, and have presented vi- 
sions of a new Middle East underpinned 


sions of a new Middle East underpinned 
by cooperation among regional parties. 

This is why Japan believes that it 
should actively support the multilateral 
talks, to foster an atmosphere that will 
help keep the peace process moving for- 
ward, while building trust and confi- 
dence. It is in (his arena that Japan has 
engaged itsdf most vigorously. 

The fundamental objective of the 
multilateral negotiations is to help re- 
gional parties to establish peaceful and 
constructive relationships that will un- 
derpin a new Middle East alter peace 
agreements are concluded. 

Since 1993, Japan has participated in 
all five working groups in the multilater- 


al negotiations: those on the environ- 
ment, regional economic development, 
water resources, refugees, and arms con- 
trol and regional security. Japan is par- 
ticularly proud of its efforts in the envi- 
ronmental group, which it chairs. 

Since the beginning of the multilateral 
negotiations, we have pointed out that 
those arrangements which lay a founda- 
tion for regional cooperation are no less 
important than are concrete infrastruc- 
ture projects for a new Middle East. 

In the working group on the environ- 
ment, Japan has proposed the drafting 
of a regional code of conduct so that 
governments, private companies and in- 
dividuals and communities have a fuller 
understanding of the need for environ- 
mental conservation. We hope regional 
cooperation in this field can be promot- 
ed through the establishment of a re- 
gional code of conduct. 

In the working group on regional eco- 
nomic development. Japan has pro- 
posed the establishment and promotion 


of an action plan for regional economic 
development that seeks to enhance in- 
terdependence among regional parties 


through the development of tourism- 
related industries. 

We believe that tourism can be an 


conducting Supercollider began its inex- 
orable march toward extinction, there 
have been rumors in the American scien- 
tific community that physics is dead. 

According to the doomsayers, experi- 
mental physicists no longer have the 
accelerators with which to discover 
“new physics.” and theorists are merely 
conjuring up beautiful mathematical 
fantasies with no hope of verifying them. 

Then, in April scientists at the Fermi 
National Accelerator Laboratory in Ba- 
tavia, Illinois, announced that they had 
convincing evidence to support the exis- 
tence of the so-called top quark. The top 
quark is the final missing elementary 
panicle in what physicists call the Stan- 
dard Model the prevailing theory of 
particles and forces I hat explains how 
the universe is composed. 

The discovery of the top quark, if 
confirmed, may be the biggest scientific 


administration in 1986. would get such a 
whopping in 1993? Einstein said a physi- 
cist's goal is “to know the mind of God." 


cist's goal is "to know the mind of God." 
but be never had to deal with the mind 
of a congressman. 

The scientists at Fermilab must be 
congratulated. Their top-quark findings 
were a scientific feat of almost unfath- 
omable difficulty. It was a 90-yard 


MEANWHILE 


event of the decade. Optimists namced. 
proclaiming physics alive and well 


effective means of propelling regional 
economies. It has the potential to cre- 


economies. It has the potential to cre- 
ate jobs and attract foreign currency 
to the whole region. 

Japan, with its proven record of efforts 
on tbe multilateral stage, can help move 
the Middle East peace process along by 
developing the multilateral aspect of its 
two-track approach in line with the dra- 
matic progress being achieved on the bi- 
lateral stage. This two-track approach is 
necessary for the long-term success of the 
process, and Japan looks forward to play- 
ing a more active role in the Middle East 
peace process through political economic 
and cultural contributions. I too, intend 
to take a more active approach to all 
aspects of the Middle East peace process. 

International Herald Tribune. 


proclaiming physics alive and well 
As one who has made his living writ- 
ing about subatomic particles and the 
sci enlists who chase them. I would love 
to join in the chorus. Unfortunately, just 


touchdown pass with five seconds left in 
the game. Unfortunately, they were 
trailing by six touchdowns. 

What lies ahead? Scientists might take 
solace from an editorial in The New York 
Times on April 29. which comforted us 
with the words: ‘'Physicists are turning to 
cheap and imaginative ways of investigat- 
ing these phenomena that do not require 
expensive, brute-force machines. That is 
the soundest approach.” 

This is like the joke about the drunk 
who looks for his keys under the street 


lamp because the light is better there. 
Much has been made of the new aer 


like Elvis, physics is still dead. There is 
almost no federal money for iL 


money for iL 


Physicists, a high-rolling bunch, 
aked their lot with the $1 1 billion Tex- 


staked their lot with the $11 billion Tex- 
as supercollider. They bet tbe house, and 
the House (of Representatives) look it 
away last June, voting overwhelmingly 
lo cut off funds for the collider. The 
Senate followed suit in October. 

With the supercollider gone, so is any 
semblance of an American high-energy 


Much has been made of the new gen- 
eration of accelerators that are 10 to 100 
times more powerful than conventional 
machines on a foot- by-foot basis. Un- 
fortunately, some of these devices are 
only 1 centimeter long Even their pro- 
ponents warn against optimism, saying 
the devices won't be ready for serious 


particle physics for many years. 
The idea of small cheap physii 


xas is for their gamble, but who would 
have guessed that the collider, so roundly 
supported at its inception by the Reagan 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The idea of small cheap physics is an 
endearing one, warmly embraced by 
anyone who has seen too many Boris 
Karloff movies — a frizzy-haired scien- 
tist with a foreign accent makes an accel- 
erator out of an eight-track stereo, some 
toaster wire and a used Cuisinan. 

Particle physics doesn’t work that 
way. Finding the simplest laws of nature 
has never been simple, arid rarely cheap. 

Even Galileo needed a massive tower 


Make Them Pay for Peace 


) through the agreement signed hi Cairo. 

• The United States had intensively 


; promoted the Israel-Syria negotiation 
track, sending Secretary of State Warren 
■ Christopher to tbe region twice in recent 
[ months. He and 1 have discussed Middle 

• East issues and promised lo cooperate. 

* My impression is that m response to this 

• American initiative, Israel and Syria 

* have changed their attitudes toward tbe 


nations in a positive way. 

; There sti 1 ! exist negative factors that 
i might delay the achievement of a compre- 
■ hensive peace, even in the isradi-Pales- 
I onian negotiations, which have produced 

• significant results. Besides those extrcm- 
| ists opposed to the peace process, the 

• Palestinians’ interim self-government 
I is facing a number of problems stem- 
, mmg from die /act that they have not 


Regarding ” Give the UN the Means ” 
(Letters, April 27): 

I read with interest the proposal by 
one of your readers that UN peacekeep- 
ing operations be paid for by a tax on 
weapons sales. I think, however, that 
this is impractical on moral and political 
grounds. Most weapons buyers claim to 
do so in order to keep the peace; big 
countries like the United States and 
France that use such sales as an adjunct 
to their defense capabilities would reject 
it out of hand. 

I would like to suggest th3t countries 
that need UN intervention, wanted or 
unwanted, be obliged to pay for it. An 
independent body could issue “peace 
bonds" to each member state according 
to its GNP and population. Member 
states would be requited to “loan” mon- 
ey for UN operations on the security of 
these. Waning parties would have to 
pay or make arrangements to pay the 
appropriate interest on the bonds to 
their various holders or face a vigorous 
effort to collect the debt. 

While it might seem, unfair to force 


“aggressors" and victims alike to pay the 
costs of conflict, debt can be a powerful 
instrument for demonstrating good inten- 
tions and a willingness to take on the 
tasks of responsible government A “vic- 
tim" could gain greatiy from the support 
of its friends and creditors; an “aggres- 
sor^ would certainly suffer from the gen- 
eral mistmsL in which it is held. In addi- 
tion. UN humanitarian aid to the victims 
of war, refugees and displaced persons, 
could be laid directly at the doorstep of 
those responsible for their distress. 

Vigorous debt collection may not give 
the same moral satisfaction as the pursuit 
of a war criminal, but il would provide 
the immensely practical service of forcing 
the ideologists and warriors of this world, 
as well as those “innocent" parties who 
benefit from their acts, to take responsi- 
bility for their ideas and acts. 

EILEEN CLOUSE. 

Ballston Spa, New York. 


Countless Landings at Home" (May 24) 
bv Richard Reeves: 


Your series on Europe and America. 
“Fifty Years After D-Day.” was gener- 
ally admirable. But the contribution by 
Mr. Grenier was tendentious. Anti- 
Americanism has nothing to do with 
racism: It is a special kind of reaction to 
America's ubiquitous and powerful 
presence. Power and success have al- 
ways created resentment But precisely 
because of the “messianic message" of 
salvation mentioned by Richard Reeves, 
there is a particularly total rejection of 
the myths and symbols of America, as 
well as the American model of society. 
Mr. Grenier can, however, rest assured: 
The tiny minorities who practice classi- 
cal anti-, Americanism in Europe have 


been on the decline since the Gulf War 
and even among them there are none 
who would wish to push the victim sta- 
tus of Americans in the direction his 
analogy would suggest 

D. W. ELLWOOD. 

Bologna, Italy. 


leaning to one side so be could drop 
various objects from the lop. As lock 
would have il he lived in Pisa. 

There is another supposedly bright 


area of physics: theory. Theorists re- 
quire only pencils, paper and a faculty 
lounge. In recent yean theoretical phys- 
ics has merged with cosmology arid as- 
trophysics to make wonderful predic- 
tions about the universe. These so-called 
discoveries have been widely reported. 

In March, Tbe New York Tunes Book 
Review carried a rave review of two 
books, by tbe theorists Kip S. Thorne 
and Mknio Kaku, about black holes, 
white holes, wormholes, parallel uni- 
verses, time travel and 1 0-dimensional 
space- lime. “These authors, of course 
stated the reviewer, “are not fiction writ- 


Thosft Oxford Animals 


Regarding "Clinton Walks Oxford's 
Halls of Protest" (June 9): 

Well did he? It seems that President 
Bill Clinton not only avoided references 
to his own action against the Vietnam 
War bnt also shunned contact with un- 


dergraduates who were demonstrating 
against — what? His countenancing of 


Behind Anti-Americanism 


Regarding “ The Elite and 'Intellectual 
Hubris' ” ( May 30) by Richard Grenier 
and “ The American Dynamic: Shaped by 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor" and contain the writer's sig- 
nature, name and full address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are suhfect to 
editing He cannot be responsible for 
the return nf unsolicited manuscripts. 


The president would not have been run- 
ning much physical risk. The hot person 
to be shocked by the ferocity of Oxford 
youth was Walter Pater, who said a 
century ago that they reminded him of 
“animals at feeding time.” Since then, 
they have all been fed. 

DAVID DORRANCE. 

Paris. 


ers." Really? Then what are they? 

David Lindley, a theorist formerly 
with Fermilab, told me that such hy- 
potheses aren’t considered fiction only 
because “they haven’t been disproved 
yet" Tbe same could be said of many 
“Star Trek" episodes. 

The reviewer says that Mr. Thome 
has been published in “unassailably cau- 
tious scientific journals.” As Mr. Lind- 
ley pointed out, only tbe math in such 


journals is unassailable, not necessarily 
tbe conclusions. 

Mr. Lindley became so discouraged 
with theoretical physics that he quit the 
field to become a science writer. This is 
like Donald Trump deciding to become a 
bellhop. He published a book last sum- 
mer robed “The End of Physics." in 
which he pointed out that many of to- 
day's trendy theories have never been 
verified by experiment, and can never be. 

Take superstring theory, the 10-di- 
mension aJ “theory of everything” which 
holds that six extra dimensions, not ap- 
parent to the naked eye or even the 
naked accelerator, were all curled up in a 
tiny ball in the infant universe. If we 
could go back in time. IS billion years 
or so. we could verily — or disprove — 
su persuing theory. 

Actually, accelerators do. in effect, go 
back in time by creating very hot condi- 
tions similar lo those present in the very 
early universe. The bigger the accelera- 
tor, the further back one can travel. 

Leon Ledermaru the former director of 
Fermilab and a Nobel laureate, did some 
whimsical back-of-the-envelope calcula- 
tions to figure out what it would take to 
test supers tring theory. Assuming super- 
collider technology could be improved 
tenfold, he estimated it would take an 
accelerator one light-year in radius. Con- 
gress is unlikely to approve such a ma- 
chine. Superstring theory is safe. 

These theories are merely mathemati- 
cal extrapolations erf current data. 

In the 19th century. Lord Kelvin, the 
unassailable physicist of his day, using 
mathematics and the new laws of ther- 
modynamics. determined that the sun 
and earth were a mere 100 million years 
old, an eye blink in cosmological time. 

He was wrong, of course. His math 
was lovely, but his data were incom- 
plete. He did not know about radioactiv- 
ity or about nuclear power. 

What data haven’t we discovered yet? 
We do not know, of course, and we 
won't until we start experimenting again 
in a big way. 

These are momentous times. We are 
about to see a major culture. America, 
discard a major science, physics. Has 
this ever happened before? 

Think of societies that have left en- 
during monuments. The Druids — or 
their predecessors — left us Stonehenge. 
The ancient Egyptians and the Mayans - 
left us pyramids. These structures served 
astronomical functions. They were sci- 
entific instruments. This spades to the 
priorities of these ancient people. 

When, millennia hence, archaeolo- 
gists dig up the United States, they will 
find two odd features: a well-main- 
tained Disney World in the Florida 
swamps and die enormous, half-finished 
tunnel for the supercollider in the Texas 
prairi& They will do some quick extrap- 
olations and jump to some harsh conclu- 
sions about our culture. Unfortunately, 
they will be right. 


7 he writer, winner of the 1994 Ameri- 
can Institute of Physics science writing 
award, is editor of VQ, a motorcycle mag- 
azine. He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


1‘fi.Jn h\ I -limit » In 7.i mi urn 



The Children’s Dreams. 


A message from Roger MiUa. 
Cameroonian soccer star — 
WorldCup 1982, 1 990 and 1994. 


...the rhihl's one chance to grow properly in mind and body 
should be shielded from the mistakes, misfortunes and mutig- 
nanrie s of the adult world... this protection should have a 
first coll on society’s concerns and capacities so it can be 
maintained in bad times as tvell as good. 


— from UNICEF s 
The Progrrss of Nations 1 994 report 


^^^ddGiqp 94 starts tomorrow and we’re the official camera, 
••>•&> we thought it would be a good time to run an ad. 

^ About something else. 


I believe in dreams. At 
the last WorldCup, our 
team from Cameroon 
played, better than 
many expected. It was 
a dream come true. 
The success of 
f'MofciHi.p.fMr Cameroon is an indi- 

cation or the great pole n rial Africa lias. 
Too often, though, that potential remains 
untapped. There are many children who 
never get the chance to see how fast ihcv 
can run, how high they can jump, or how 
many goals they can score. Instead of 
dreaming about being football ers, doctors or 
musicians, they struggle to survive. 

The WorldCup has given me a chance 
to speak for African children. I want to make 
sure their rights are protected. I want them 
to be immunized, and to see that children, 
especially girls, are educated. And I want 
abandoned children to be cared For and 
protected. 

I am thrilled to take part in this World- 
Cup 94. But I believe the most important 
goals that I, or anyone, can score, are in 
helping UNICEF ensure that in the future, 
all children will have the chance to follow 
their dreams. 



^Tomorrow in the flm day of WorldCup 94. the 


iomorrow * — — * . . , . 

World* biggest single-sport event A good tone to 
Zf-'Sari fitness, achievements, and well-bemg with 
photography of profession^ p ■}*»• 
todav is the Day of the Afncan Child, a 
;i^nroinderof the June 1976 Soweto massacre and the 
S^F^ontiriuingpiight of African childien. 

«pf£&r»v tfeie*. achievements, and I wll*e mg with 
'-photography of „„.-s»-pr..fess.onal players 
■vlp^iid givei. a choice Of ad topics, we voted for 
“goals. 

>^.=35 • ' _ 


We yearn for the day when UNICEF's goals for all 
African children, and not only those in the photograph, 
will be reality rather titan promise?. When cameras 
throughout Africa will be capturing liinevs rather 
than malnutrition, achievement 
rather than tragedies, well- 
being rather than malaise. 

UNICEF, the United Nations 
Children's Fund, is 
the world’s best hope 
to hasten that day. 



Wc share UNICEF's vision of global well-being 
through local development because it's how we con- 
duct our own business. And we're sharing this space 
to increase awareness of UNICEF and its work. 

Thanks to that work, there is progress in some 
African countries. But many are still performing 
below expectations. And a come-from-behind win in 
that arena is an event we'd like to see everyone sponsor. 


ifigri ,1/i/Ai 


Help UNICEF help children. 


unicef 



United Nations Children’s Fund 


Canon 


Fnr the vUreu U vuur neatest UNICEF ufTiee, wfttc | U 
UNICEF HQ . » l* N. Ftua. Nr* Yoric. Ne* Yr*k I«|P. I'M 


TW* column h donated by 
Canon and The International Herald Tribune. 


■ ••sUvs-I ~ 

r. - . 




¥ SUS'B^KT ^ &T5 FCTK fTP* [TBVTSfY aoo o ri atfe r T **3 1 r S -td m j-ro 










Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


t . 

l 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


AIDS and Suicide: Hard Truths 



ftrw York Tima Smite 
EW YORK — Among people with 
AIDS, it is an open secret. When the 
time comes, many say, they are going 
to take control of their death. They 
arc going to enlist the help of friends, f amil y, 
lovers and sympathetic doctors, and they are 
going to lake an overdose of pills or put a 
plastic bag over their heads or add a little too 
much morphine to an intravenous drip, and 
they are going to kill themselves. 

People with AIDS and their advocates say 
that virtually everyone with the disease at least 
thinks about suicide when the end is near and 
wonders how it might be done. 

Several studies in New York. California and 
Texas have consistently shown that people with 
.AIDS kill themselves at a much higher rate than 
people with other chronic diseases and that the 
suicide rate among people with AIDS is 10 to 
20 times that of the general population. 

“In the AIDS community it’s widespread, it’s 
ethical, it’s noble,” said Martin Delaney, the 
director of Project Inform, an advocacy group 
for people with AIDS. In part because the com- 
munity" tends to be closely knit, those contem- 
plating suicide often seek the advice of others, 
including doctors. A study in San Francisco 
showed that doctors who treat large numbers of 
AIDS patients are more likely than other doctors 
to agree to assist in suicides. 

But even an advocate like Mr. Delaney cau- 
tioned that “this whole assisied-passage stuff 
isn't for everyone.” 

Last month, a New York Slate task force 
came out against assisted suicide, while a feder- 


al judge in Seattle ruled that assisting in sui- 
cides should be legal. The same month.ajur> in 
Detroit acquitted Dr. lack Kevorkian of killing 
a terminally ill patient. And as the experience or 
people with AIDS has shown, there is little 
agreement on how far to go in helping a dying 
person lake his or her life. 

There are several reasons why AIDS would 
stand out in eliciting suicide attempts, said Dr. 
Peter M. Marzuk, a psychiatrist at New York 
Hospital -Cornell Medical Center, who has 
studied suicide rales among people with AIDS. 

Not only is AIDS debilitating and ultimately 
fatal, but the infections that take hold when the 
immune system is weakened and the drugs 

many patients take both can cause depression 
or delirium, either of which can elicit suicidal 
thoughts. Dr. Marzuk said. 

And. as he pointed out: “There is a subculture 
of grief. Many people with HIV are constantly 
grieving for people they know who have bad the 
illness and have died.” Added to that, he said. 
“There are just tremendous psychosocial stress- 
ors associated with AIDS — financial insecurity, 
homelessness, joblessness, social isolation.” 

But, doctors and gay men said, many who 
talk bravely of suicide find that the deed is not 
so easily done. 

“It's not as simple as Jack Kevorkian would 
like it to be." said Dr. Daniel William, a New 
York doctor with a large AIDS practice. .Al- 
though it may sound straightforward to store up 
a cache of tranquilizers and then swallow them 
one day, “the reality is that most people with 
AJDS Have very strong cardiovascular systems,” 
he said. “Taking overdoses of most common 
prescription pills is not going to kill you.” 


It also can be difficult to time a suicide. Dr. 
Donald Abrams, a doctor with a large AIDS 
practice at the University of California at San 
Francisco, said that time and time again he had 
seen patients prepare for suicide, then become 
demented from AIDS and unable to escape the 
fate they were trying to avoid. 

Much else can go wrong as well. One elhicisi 
told of a man in Illinois wbo tried to smother 
his lover with a pillow but ended up asphyxiat- 
ing him just enough to destroy most of his 
brain's functions. 

A New York doctor told of a friend who trio! 
to kill himself by overdosing on his tuberculosis 
medication. He tried a second lime by taking 
Darvon, and failed again. 

“You don’t know how terrible it is when you 
decide to end your life and then wake up in the 
morning and find yourself still alive," he told 
the doctor. 

Dr. Delaney said that sometimes people try 
increasing the amount of intravenous morphine 
they have been given for pain relief to the point 
where it wfll be JaiaL “The problem is, they tend 
to do it gently and gradually and hope they w3J 
fade out without pain.” be said. “Instead, they 
can develop tolerance, enormous tolerance.” 

Many people change their minds, as Dr. 
Marzuk pointed out. “Often people who are 
suicidal are not truly suicidal.” be said. “It's an 
expression of physical discomfort and psychic 
distress. .As many people as there are who just 
want power and mastery, there are others who 
in an impulsive moment of frustration and 
anger might take pills. 1 think there are other 
ways of getting help.” — Gin* Kolata 



Strep Comeback: Cyclical Theory 


By Gina Kolata 

JVov York Tuna Service 


Stars: The Birthplace of Planets? |^| 


By John Noble Wilford 

New York Tima Service 




EW YORK — Peering into the 
depths of the Orion Nebula, among 
the glowing gases of a stellar nursery, 
the Hubble Space Telescope has de- 
tected the strongest evidence yet that many 
newly evolving stars bear the seeds of future 
planets, suggesting that planets may be a com- 
mon occurrence in the universe. 

In the photographic survey of young stars in 
Orion, astronomers determined that at least 
half of them were surrounded by the raw mate- 
rial for planetary formation. 

The material "swirls about the stars in flat- 
tened disks of spreading dust, glowing from the 


reflected light of stars all about the region. 
Closer analysis showed that the disks contain 
enough mass to produce Earth-size planets, but 
□o planets have been sighted there. 

The abundance cf these so-called protoplan- 
etary disks in a cluster of young stars, many of 
them less than 300.000 years old shows that the 
ingredients for making planets exist around a 
significant fraction of stars, astronomers an- 
nounced. They said this reinforced the proba- 
bility that many stars had planetary systems. 

The new observations with the space tele- 
scope's repaired optics were described by Dr. C. 
Robert O’Dell, an astronomer at Rice Universi- 
ty in Houston, at a news conference at the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion in Washington. Details of the findings are 


to be published in The Astrophysics! JoaraaL 

“This provides strong proof that protoplane- 
tary disks are a common product of solar forma- 
tion,” Dr. O’Dell said “And these are prerequi- 
sites to the formation of planetary systems.” 

The discovery is one more important contri- 
bution to the accumulating evidence that the 
sun, one of countless stars, is not alone in 
having a retinue of orbiting bodies. Tantalizing 
dues of such proloplanetary disks have been 
observed over the last decade. 

In April radio astronomers said new observa- 
tions confirmed the existence of two and possi- 
bly three large planets around a pulsar, the 
spinning re mnan t of an exploded star. This was 
generally regarded as the first definitive evidence 
of planets around sum other than the sun. 


BOOKS 


ELLA FITZGERALD: 

A Biography of the First 
Lady of Jazz 

By Stuart Nicholson Illustrated 
334 pages. S23. Charles 
Scribners Sons. 

Reviewed by 
Margo Jefferson 

S OME performers win our 
hearts "with their imperfec- 
tions: others seem so gif ted that our 
love is always accompanied by res- 
ervations. Thai must be why Ella 
Fitzgerald still arouses so much 
discontent fame and fortune not- 
withstanding 

She can't sing the blues, go the 
complaints. She’s girlish but sex- 
less, cordial but distant, and she 
h as no emotional attachment to the 
lyrics of her songs. 

But once that's out of the way. 
what is left? Pure pleasure that con- 
sists r*f an unfailingly keen sense of 
rhythm, tempo and pitch: a lithe, 
serene voice, and a lightly worn 
knowledge of just how to mine a 
song's harmonic necessities and 
melodic possibilities. 

We don't chastise Carole Lom- 
bard or Cary Grant for being won- 
derful comic actors and competent 
but not wonderful serious ones. 
Fitzgerald’s gifts follow the same 
course. 

She does not confess or dramatize 
when she sinss of love lost or Jonged 
for. But when she’s in top form, she 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Ward Just, novelist and former 
journalist, is reading, “ Pale Horse. 
Pale Rider " by Katherine Anne 
Porter. 

“1 haven’t read Porter in many. 
many years and find her as good as 
I recalled-'' (K Neil Cukier. IHTl 



doesn't banish emotion, either: she 
acknowledges it in tranquillity. 

In the words of Stuart Nicholson 
in “Ella Fitzgerald,” she disappears 
into the song, which makes biogra- 
phy a tricky enterprise. Fitzgerald 
lived through, not just with or in, 
music. 

Nicholson does a very fine job 
with Fitzgerald the musician, but 
admits that she has always disliked 
talking about anything more pri- 
vate. If pressed, he writes, she would 
pull out the tale “of a we-were-poor- 
but-happy childhood and of a moth- 
er always on hand with homespun 
philosophy to soothe the growing 
pains of childhood.” 

He adds, “The story was repeal- 
ed again and again until it became 
standard journalistic copy, but all 
along it was just another song into 
which she could disappear.” 


Ella Jane Fitzgerald was bora in 
Newport News. Virginia, and 
reared in Yonkers. New York, by 
her mother. Temperance Williams, 
and her stepfather. Joseph DaSilva. 

She sang and danced before, after 
and on the way to school. She told 
her friends she was going to be fam- 
ous. She practiced the Susie Q and 
the Snake Hips swivel, and she lis- 
tened closely 10 I- 00 * 5 Armstrong, 
Bing Crosby and the Boswell Sisters, 
mimicking both their voices and the 
instruments that backed them. 

She was 14 when her mother died 
in 1932 and 16 when she got herself 
onto the stage of the Apollo The- 
atre in New York, wearing men’s 
boots and cast-off clothes, and won 
the Amateur Night contest 
In the years between, she was a 
grimy link street singer and raga- 
■mulfm. She left a bullying septa- 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 

A MAN who made a consider- 
able mark on bridge in its ear- 
ly years was George Sturgis, who 
died in March at the age of 90. 

He contributed greatly to the 
theory - of endgames, and was a 
stickler for exactitude in bridge ter- 
minology and other areas. It pained 
him when no-trump was spelled 
with a hyphen, as in this column, or 
as two words, as in England. 
Thanks in pan to his efforts, “no- 
trump" is now commonly used. He 
also insisted that the North posi- 
tion in a duplicate game should 
correspond to geographic Nonh. 
and upset some directors by rear- 
ranging their table cards. 

His book “Endpla>s at Bridge 
Explained” went through many re- 
visions after its appearance in 1 932. 
In it he claimed to have been the 
first to make the crucial play in the 


deal shown. It was a gambit aimed 
at gaining a tempo, and he called it 
the Coffin Coup. 

Playing at the Boston Chess 
Club, which had long turned from 
wooden kings and queens to the 
pasteboard variety, he held the 
South cards and landed in six 
spades. North's four no-trump was 
tne Culbertson variety, predating 
Blackwood: It showed either three 
aces, or two aces and the king of a 
bid suit. 

When West led the diamond 
king. South ruffed and regretted his 
failure to bid a grand slam. But 
when he took two of dummy’s 
Lrump winners, he discovered that 
he had done the right thine, for 
East discarded. He therefore 
cashed the heart ace and overtook 
the remaining spade honor with his 
ace. This set up a trump trick for 
West, but left South in control. He 
could play heart winners, and still 


have a trump as an entry whenever 
West chose to ruff. South had sacri- 
ficed a trick, but made his slam. 

NORTH 
* KQ J 


■■ T : i 1 
i KO' 


WEST 
A 10 9 6 -I 
" 6 

•: A K Q JO 9 fi 
*6-5 


cAST 


7937543 
' J = 

* J 10 9 S 
SOUTH rD) 

* A T 5 3 2 
~ K Q J 10 2 

*5 3 2 

Both sides were vulnerable. The 


bidding: 

South 

W-SI 

North 

East 

1 * 

2 ■; 

•i* 

Pass 

A 

Pass 

1 N.T. 

Pass 

6<? 

Pass 

b 4 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 




then earned pocket money running 
the numbers and warning prosti- 
tutes when the police came near, 
dropped out of school, and ran away 
from the orphanage to which the 
Board of Education bad sent her. 

She got her start with the drum- 
mer Chick Webb's band, and she 
led it to the big-limc with “A-Tis- 
ket. a-Tasket," that pouty swing 
version of a nursery rhyme that 
seems to capture the essence of 
every nymphet from Shirley Tem- 
ple to Lolita. 

When Webb died in 1939, she 
went on. learning the speedy intri- 
cacies of be- bop in the 1940s and 
plaving the role of gracious, if de- 
tached, hostess to songwriters like 
Cole Porter and Irving Berlin in the 
1950s. 

At first the voice was slightly 
overcast, in the manner of Cornice 
Boswell By the 1940s it had en- 
tered a zone of vibrato-free purity, 
and it remained there for a quarter- 
century. When it began to decline, 
along with her health (cataracts 
and diabetes), she kept performing 

Nicholson follows her ceaseless, 
even brutal tour schedule and her 
ceaseless, even indiscriminate pro- 
ductivity with clear-eyed intelli- 
gence. According to a discography 
provided by the jazz, historian and 
broadcaster Phil Schaap, Fitzger- 
ald recorded nearly everv vear from 
1939 to 1989. 

The producer John Hammond 
once admitted that he didn't notice 
Fitzgerald’s work in the *30s be- 
cause she wasn't sexy like Billie 
Holiday. Chick Webb ooliced her. 
but noi, Nicholson shows, without 
lodging a mean-spirited protest. 

“1 don’t want that old ugly 
thing!” he declared, to which Kai- 
ser Marshall, a band member with 
much more foresight, replied. “You 
damn fool you better take her!” 

Her renditions of Cole Porter 
and Rodgers and Hart are not dis- 
tinguished because the lyrics de- 
mand savvy theatrics. She sings 
Duke Ellington beautifully because 
she undercuts his too-often saccha- 
rine lyricists. And she sings the 
Gershwins sublimely because they 
were as drawn to high spirits and 
perpetuai youth as she. 

Oscar Hammerstein and Jerome 
Kern night as well have been 
thinking of her when they wrote: 

The music is **«?«, 

The words are true, 
i fte rone is rwc 


EW YORK — Invasive 
streptococcus infections, 
which in their most viru- 
lent form are caused by, 
deadly “flesh-eating” bacteria, as 
they are frequently described, have 
seldom been seen in past decades. 

Many in the medical profession 
had assumed that antibiotics and 
improved hygiene had essentially 
gotten rid of them for good. But 
now, although these infections are 
still rare, they seem to be experienc- 
ing a comeback, without any no- 
ticeable deterioration in social con- 
ditions and with their susceptibility 
to penicillin intact 
Researchers suggest that the ebb 
and flow of streptococcal strains 
may be f»rt of a general waxiqg and 
waning of bacterial populations. 

“If you look at any infectious 
disease — I don’t care what ic is — 
they all tend to run in cycles.” said 
Dr. Edward L. Kaplan, a pediatrics 
professor and strep expert at the 
University of Minnesota wbo runs 
the World Health Organization’s 
reference laboratory for strep. 
There are more than 80 strains of 
i, but only a few predominate 


m the population at any one time. 

Severe strep infections tint, like 
today’s deadly strains of strepto- 
coccus A, were reported to produce 
toxic shod: and the destruction of 
muscle and flesh, were weB known 
during World War H, Dr. Kaplan 
said. 

But they seemed to die out al- 
most entirely until the late 1980s, 
when doctors began describing 
dusters of cases in the RocJjy 
Mountain states, Scandinavia, 
Australia, New Zealand and other 
parts of the world. So far this year, 
about a dozen people have died of 
invasive strep in England. In the 
last few months, the disease has 
appeared in scattered places 
throughout the United States, in- 
cluding Connecticut, New York, 
North Carolina and Los Angeles. 

The federal Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention in Atlanta 
monitored four states from 1989 to 
1991, when the deadly strep infec- 
tions were first being "noticed. 
Fran the numbers of infections it 
found, the agency calculated that 


10.000 to 15,000 infections were 
occurring each year. 

Dr. Jay Wenger of the centers 
said “there was an upsurge of this 
serious disease” around 199% Jim 
Henson, the creator of the Mop- 
pets, died of it that year. And, Dr. 
Wenger added, “There does seem 
to be a cyclical nature at least to the 
severe disease.” 

Since scientists do not know for 
sure what drives the strep cycles, 
and since there is no requirement to 
report strap infections to the Cen- 
ters for Disease Control, they can 
only speculate about whether the 
surge m deadly infections that be- 
gan several years ago has passed its 
peak. 

Some exprts say the worst is over 
while othere say it is not. But all 
agree that the deadly strep is likely 
to remain rare: Infections tend to 
be sporadic, with no evidence that 
they can s w ee p through a commu- 
nity the way strep throat can sweep 
through a classroom. 

Different bacteria have different 
patterns of emergence, according 
to Dr. Patrick SchEevert, a micro- 
biologist at the University cf Min- 
nesota wbo studies strep and sta- 
phylococci 

Most are poorly understood. 
Staph, for instance, seems to abide 
by a 10-year cycle. Every decade: 
Dr. Schtievert said, a different 
staph strain cranes into promi- 
nence, peaking in tbe fifth year and 
'dying out by the 10th, at which 
point a new strain is craning in.. 
Some staph strains are much worse 
than others. The strain that peaked 


in 195S was causing 85 percent of 
all hospital infections, very severe 
infections that were the despair of 
doctors. But .that strain disap- 
peared an its own by I960: 

Bubonic plague, caused by die 
bacteria Yersinia, also waxes and 
wanes, Dr. Scfalieveit sad, pointing 
out that die organism is now in a 
quiescent phase. 

But there may be more to the 
increased incidence of invasive 
strep than die resurgence of an old 
strain of the bacteria. Dr. P. Patrick • 
Geaiy, amxrohioJcgisist the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, discovered 
that some strep bacteria of the Ml 
strain, one of the handful of strep 
strains that are now infecting 
Americans, acquired a viral Infec- 
tion around 1987. 

The infected bacteria, he said, 
were isolated from patients with 
the deadly strep, kadmg Dr. Geary 
to speculate that one reason the 
dangerous strep may have ap- 
peared in the late 1980s was that 
some otherwise mundane strep 
were infected with a vims that gave 
them toxin-producing genes. . 

T HE resurgence of deadly 
strep has caught research- 
ers unprepared. Strep bac- 
teria in general are so easi- 
ly killed with penicillin that they 
“are not considered a major prob- 
lem in this corailiy,” said Dr.Vm- 
centFiscbetti, who directs the lab- 
oratory' of bacterial 'pathogenesis - 
and immunology ; at Rockefeller. 
University m New Tort 
Nonctheless, researchers say. 


some work is being done on pre- 
venting outbreaks. One promising 
l ead is a drug that may partly de- 
fuse the bactaria-thar causes the 
deadly form of. strep and another is 

a. vaccine that may prevent all strep 
infections. . 

- Dr. Schlievert-said strep bacte- 
ria had .a number of ways to in- 
vade and dotheir damage. Fibron- 
ectm binding protein allows them 
to stick toc<Ss, by attaching to tbe 
. protein that cells - use. - to hook 

themselves together. In addition, 
the bacteria bave prti tons on their 
surface, called M protons, that 
thwart the immune system. Nor- 
mally,, white blood cells would en- 
gulf .and destroy invading bacte- 
ria. But strep's M proteins prevent 
that. _ 

In addition;strepUodt the white 
cells’ calls for new recruits in' their 
attack against the ravading bacte- 
ria. The -strep secrete an enzyme 
that chops up a protein the white 
cells use ml a signal. - ' 

; With these defenses* said Dr. 
Fischetti, even the 'benign .strep . 
throat bacteria amply remain in 
the throat Xar a. wet* or two- until, 
the body can produce antibodies 
that inactivate them or until the 
person takes penicillin, winch kills 
strep bacteria. ■ 

- Bal the deadly strepstrmns have 
an additional weapon -"that turns 
them in to the flcslHjestroying vari- 
ety. Tbey-seem to pick-up a toxin 
that allows than to mvade the body.j 
breaking through cells and tisriies 
that normally vrouW.be barriers. 


New Breast Cancer Threat? 


The Aaodmed Pros 

W ASHINGTON — Women exposed 
to electrical or magnetic fields oo the 
job had a higher incidence of breast 
caztoer than other women, according 
to North Carolina researchers. 

Tbe study, published in the Journal of the 
National Cancer Institute, analyzed more than 
140,000 death certificates from 24 states and found 
that women in electrical occupations had a 38 
percent higher rate of breast cancer mortality. . 

Tbe lead author, Dana P. Looms of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina School of Public Health, 


admowiedged that the study bad “important limi- 
tations’* but adds new information on the sugges- 
tion from other smdies.that low level electromag- 
netic energy caa cancer. "■ • ’ 

“I don't dunk we’ve proven it,” Dr. Loomis said. 
“But we have taken it one Step closer.” 

He said his study (fid not take into account other 
exposures, such as diet or smoking, that could 
contribute to the cancer risk. . 

An editorial in the Journal by Dr. Dimitries 
Tricbopoulos of the Hansard School of Public 
Health said the added breast cancer risk “appears 
to be small and marginally significant.” 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

i Swit co-star 

9 Record label 
abbr. 

a E. Coyote 

12 Foreman 
14 Superdome and 
Sifverdome, 
eg 

18 Nursery rhyme 
listeners 
18 Dig it! 
n Puzzlement 
20 Kind ot badge 


22 'The 

Counterfsitars' 

author 

23 hound 

MMaUdient 
*7 Model Carol 
21 Com chip 
topping 
aoLacosteand 
others 

32 Kart Malone's 
team 

ae Pleases 
28 Large number 
37 Pave over 


Solution to Puzzle of June 15 

n 


West led the diamond King. 


Margo Jefferson is on the staff of 
The Ne* York Times. 


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□□□□ GjHauB aaaa 
tasQDQ eds aaaaa 
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DQHaa □□□□□ 
aanmaan aaaana 

□SHED SOB 313000 

sasa asasa saaa 
□sci naasaas □□□ 
BnaasniB mssaasa 
anaaaa □□aasa 
QQniin asaoB 


*■ Heroic story 
ei Actress Fanow 
42 More retiring 
44 Outshines 

48"... saw 

Sba" 

47 Emwetok. ag. 

48 Brooklyn Bridge 
designer 

92 Ear)/ TVs 
Denise 

S3 Pretty MakTs 
nursery rhyme 

declaration 
3» Former PhXy 
mayor Wilson 
etal. 

88 Fiddte-taddie ■ 
co Toshiba rival 
8t Band 's booking 
«z Campaign 

DOWN 

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reign 

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17 Lively lets 

20 Soda jerk’s 
drink 

21 Property 
23 ‘Ironside* 

actress 
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24 Basketry twig 
29 Kind Of paint 
28 Another round 

28 Coasting at 
US shammer 

31 Un ton and 
others: Abbr. 

33 Opposes of 
8-Oown 

39 Thievery 

'as 1970 Ossie - . 

. Devts musical . 

40 Lauds 

43 Hokte one’s 
horses? 

49 First-rate joke 


48 Fixes 
48 Novel set on 
. Tahiti 


91 The DrUtonsi _ 58-— r flash 

S8 Wash; advisory - 
grp- 

so Designer von S4 Miss Piggy ’ 57 Command to a 

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.© New York Times Edited by Wilt Sham. 


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International Herald Tribune , Thursday, June 16. 1994 


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he architects of time 


Page 9 


New Curb 
On China 


Most Exchanges 
Will Be dosed 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

SHANGHAI — Beijing an- 
nounced Wednesday a crackdown 


Mi ihe futures industry that will stop 
trading on most of China’s 40-odd 
exchanges and ban domestic broker- 
ages from placing orders overseas. 

Only slate trading companies will 
be allowed to place futures contracts 
overseas, and trading inside China 
will be more regulated, according to 
a circular from the Slate Council. 
China's cabinet, published in the 
China Securities News. 

The move follows a warning on 
Sunday by the official People’s Dai- 
ly newspaper that speculation on 
international futures markets had 
led to huge foreign exchange losses. 

In April, trading was stopped in 
some steel, sugar and coal con- 
tracts. and the largest metals ex- 
change. in Shanghai, was instruct- 
ed to shift to a cash-only payment 
system by July 1. 

On Wednesday, the State Council 
called for a “strict hall to the blind 
development of futures markets.' 1 

Domestic exchanges with volume 
of less than 100 miQjon yuan ($11 5 
million) in the first four months of 
1994 will be shut down, with most to 
be turned into wholesale markets 
banned from dealing in futures. 

The circular calls for a rc- regis- 
tration procedure, in which only a 
“minority" of existing futures bro- 
kerages and exchanges will be al- 
lowed to stay open. Foreign-fund- 
ed futures brokerages will be 
banned. 

No new futures markets will be 
approved. Index-linked futures 
trading is banned, and until curren- 
cy futures regulations are pub- 
lished, currency rate-linked futures 
are prohibited. 

China Securities News said more 
than 40 futures exchanges and 400 
brokerages bad sprung up in the 
past two or three years. “This un- 
precedented speed and scale of de- 
velop mem has shocked Western de- 
veloped countries and worried 
knowledgeable people in China." it 

SBI< *\ (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


• 4 • — VK^-.r-xv. as,:..?-.. ■»-, 


J F 
1983 

,i World Index 


J F 
1933 


The Mai tracks U S dollar values ol stocks at: Tokyo. New York. London, and 1 
Aismtina. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil. Canada. Chfla, Denmark, Finland. 
France. Germany. Hong Kong, Kaly. Mexico. Netherlands, New Zealand. Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Sweden. Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo. Now York and 1 
London, the index is composed of the 20 top issues <n terms of market capSaUzabon, 
otherwise the ten top stocks are tracked 


Industrial Sectors 


mi Pm. X 

dow dou change 

Wed Plot 
dan titoM 

% 

O^ngt 


Enatgy 11004 11075 -0-64 Capital Goods 


USffies 118.74 11928 -0.45 RawUaferiate 


finance H7.47 11705 -0.32 Consumer Goods 


Santas 117.12 11752 -0.34 Mfeeattaneous 


11436 114.32 -0.49 


125.89 12552 +051 


96.31 9820 +0.11 

12458 123.79 +058 


Fix more information about the Index, a booklel s avaiabte free of charge 
Wfte to Tn t> index. 181 Avenue Charles de GauBe . 92521 Net&iy Codex. France. 


.. , j MonHUonal Herald Triune 



The Ni-w Ynt Tin*. 1 * 


Philips: Beyond Great Flops 

Slimmed Down, It Seeks Profit in Interactive Media 


By Richard Stevenson 

New York Times Servi 1 r 

EINDHOVEN, the Netherlands — Haring pio- 
neered such products as the rideocassetle recorder, 
the compact disk and high-definiiion television. 
Philips Electronics NV. Europe’s largest electron- 
ics maker, has a deserved reputation Tor techno- 
logical prowess. 

Bui when it comes to turning technology into 
market share, Philips — known in the United 
Slates for its Magna vox, Norelco and Sylvania 
brand names — has more often fallen on its face. 

Its VCR format never caught on. Its video laser 
disk was one of the great flops in consumer electron- 
ics. Its latest hope, the digital compact cassette — jn 
audio tape with CD sound — is off to a slow siarL 

After several years of trying to revitalize Philips, 
the Dutch company's aggressive chairman. Jan D. 
Timmer. has another ambitious but risky target in 
his sights: 

The rapidly evolving world or interactive media 
— where computers, television, communications, 
entertainment and information come together — 
and particularly the software that combines pic- 
tures. sounds and words stored on compact disks 
for emenainmenL educational and business uses. 

The company has built a wide range of holdings 
through Philips Media, its New York subsidiary, 
which is headed by Scott C. Marden. a former 
investment banker. 

Set up by the parent company last year. Philips 
Media encompasses cable television and teletext 
operations in Europe, slakes in the American video 
chain Blockbuster Entertainment and in Whittle 
Common icarions. an educational media company. 


and alliances with a variety of entertainment and 
software companies. 

Its initial product for the markeL a $399 CD- 
Interactive player that hooks to a television seL has 
generated only mild consumer interest so far al- 
though the company insists that sales arc growing. 

Most analysts think the product will be squeezed 
out on the high end by personal computers 
equipped with CD-ROM and on the low end bv 
video games capable of using compact disks. 

This time Philips seems determined not to fall 
victim to another format war or to wager every- 
thing on the hardware side of the business. Philips 
Media is built on the premise that no matter which 
hardware formats catch on. there will be great 
demand for games, movies, music, educational 
programs and business-oriented software that runs 
on compact disks. 

By the end of this year, there will be 10 million 
computers in the United States equipped with CD- 
ROM. Mr. Marden said. Add in other formats like 
the Philips CD-Interactive or similar pad Lie is be- 
ing sold or planned by such companies as Atari 
and Sony, and there are “tremendous opportuni- 
ties for us to exploit our development of software.” 
he said. 

Philips is already selling 200 CD-based titles, 
ranging from an interactive version of “The Joy of 
Sex" to games like “Alien Gale" and “Voyeur." 
movies like “Top Gun." music videos, educational 
programs and interactive programs used by com- 
panies for sales training and store promotions. 

Philips owns 75 percent of Polygram NV. the 


Sec PHILIPS, Page 10 



Publishing’s Latest Setback 


By Sarah LyalJ 

New York Tunes Service 

N EW YORK — Many people think it’s 
a bad sign for publishing. The abrupt 
dismissal Tuesday of Richard E. Sny- 
der as chairman and chief executive of 
.Simon & Schuster, the company be helped build 
into u publishing behemoth over the last 33 years, 
came as a big surprise to him. his staff of more than 
9,000 and th e-publishing industry.- - - 
Erin people who have dashed with Mr. Snyder 
.—■and were are many — said his dismissal didn’t 
bode y/efl far publishing. People in the industry said 
- it would tend to destabilize Simon & Schuster when 
the industry as a whole was at a volatile point. 

The decision was made by Simon & Schuster' s 
: corporate parent. Viacom Inc., which acquired the 
'publisher as part of its $9.7 billion takeover of 
. Paramount Communications Inc. in February. 

_ Since the takeover, Mr. Snyder, whose name has 
been synonymous with Simon & Schuster for 
years, was seen as having a more stable position. 
But at-a meeting that lasted less than five min- 
. . utes, late Tuesday morning. Mr. Snyder was told by 
. Frgnk J. Biondi Jr„ Viacom’s president and chief 
•[ executive, dot he was being let go. 

Mi*. Snyder’s dismissal, some people in the in- 
dustry said,' represented an unfortunate side effect 
/of *& consolidation in the book business: People 
with no background in book publishing are now in 
-change. Executives at Viacom, however. Mid that 
.f while they were fully committed to publishing. Mr. 
Snyder's management style did not fit theirs. 

^ “We're not trying to diminish what Dick has 
-aGCopmlished,” one executive said “But Viacom 
operates in a way that’s different There’s much 
taorea premium on informality, on verbal comrou- 
; locations, which we don’t see there. And the mo- 
Simon & Schuster leaves something to be 
:'TOretL“ . 


Though Mr. Snyder has been seen as a tempera- 
mental and sometimes difficult executive with a 
tough eye for the bottom line in a business that 
depends on personal relationships, he has many 
powerful friends, and drey rallied to his defense. 

Bob Woodward the author and Washington 
Post editor whose relationship with Mr. Snyder 
dates to the 1970s when Simon & Schuster pub- 
lished “All the President’s Men," said he had 
telephoned Viacom’s chairman, Sumner M. Red- 
stone, and Mr. Biondi to express his outrage. 

“I could get no satisfactory explanation from 
them as to why they had done this," he said 

And Mort Janklow. the powerful literary agent 
and a close friend of Snyder, said that in 25 years in 
the business, he had never been more surprised 

“From the perspective of the industry, it doesn’t 
make sense," he said “Jn 1975, when Messrs. 
Simon and Schuster owned the company, they sold 
it to Gulf &. Western for Sll million. ltnow grosses 
$2 billion." 

Mr. Snyder took the company over at a time of 
disarray, "building Simon & Schuster from its core 
divisions into a publishing conglomerate that in- 
cludes scholastic books, textbooks and reference 
books as well as the fiction and nonfiction known 
as trade books. 

“Everybody's buying up everybody else, and 
Dick was a stabilizing force." one iiieraiy agent 
said even though Mr. Snyder has been criticized 
for shutting down several Simon & Schuster im- 
prints in recent years. 

"This is unnerving, when there are fewer and 
fewer companies left in publishing." the agent said 
“Everybody’s already asking what this means for 
publishing. Do you want to bring your books to a 
place where you’re not sure who’s in charge?" 

Viacom said Jonathan Newcomb. Simon & 
Schuster’s president and chief operating officer, 
would replace Mr. Snyder, effective immediately. 


Procedo 
Files for 
Protection 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WIESBADEN, Germany — 
Procedo GmbH, the German fi- 
nancing group affected by the 
bankruptcy of Balsam AG. filed for 
court protection from its creditors 
on Wednesday, in a final bid to 
stave off bankruptcy. 

But the chairman of Procedo’s 
main shareholder indicated that 
the company might still have to be 
wound up. 

Procedo was the main creditor to 
Balsam AG. the sports- surface 
maker whose four top managers 
were arrested last week on charges 
of credit fraud. 

Filing for protection means that 
Procedo will uy. under coun super- 
vision. to reach an agreement with 
its creditors as a way or reorganiz- 
ing its debL German banks are 
owed at least 1.75 billion Deutsche 
marks ($1 billion) by the group. 

The future of Procedo had been 
considered in jeopardy after its 
largest shareholder, the insurer All- 
gemeine Kredhversicherung AG, 
on Tuesday refused to give any 
special aid to cover Procedo’s 
losses on the Balsam loans. 

The creditor banks are scheduled 
to me« with Procedo’s and AKNTs 
executives Friday. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


'CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


- ___ June 15 

« s- £• » »• .iTS 1 - 
SSS!- £ S uS; « sr„: 

IKS* , uc — "2 Si ™ iS Si MB *■« 

-H 04 **. >- 0 JBUOB aim * 1 * mb Ml uh» j li5a i.\s*40 nw 

JJN* wass- mis *■” ^ 5 u* w® ,J * '*1L 

moo to* a w» *ow w *«* AMJ5 * 

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-*•*■*: v.'- r mm iiuj uaa asm **> a «* JJg. — u»- aw raw 

I ** *** “* T 2 . ^ ZZ um 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swiss 


French 


June 15 

Dollar 

D-Mark 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

ECli 

1 monlfa 4 W 

4 VS •* 

4 : c4 -«• 

4 

5*rSV5 

2-2‘e 

S i 

S manflts 4 »«-4 *« 

4*b-5 

4 «•,* 

4 --5 -- 

5 ■»-5-- 

2-2‘« 

5 V.- 5*5 

6 moaffts 4^4-4 *b 

47fc-S 

4 1*4 . 

5 

SV5-5*» 

J-? 1 ’ 

SU-S’i 

1 year 5 >r5 *- 

Seams: Routers. (.Iras sank. 

4 »«4 

5 •, 

5 ,, »-S ■■ 

3-2'i 

Fv-6 


flti/gj onrVfrrWr to Me rbo t* deposits of St million mirvmum tor eoutvotenti. 


- »™». 152 ££ Lui IWi MUN « 

l “ ‘^nnaXurtAnsUvs in oltwrtoows: Toronto 


Key M oney Rates 


L.'riJteiofaww. - Mtnr . .. i/nits of 100 : N -°- ***»•**■ 

Mvw pound, b: To bur one dollar. . units w 


V alues 

aSB£; s «i:'S35Ls K 

•zS5SSm.‘.'‘ HBDfcfcrim in 4 ® 

*££ : «e'( 

JOT tuuomdlnor 
-f&n". MBtov.rtte. 2396 


Currency 

Mex-poo 

KWttUI 

Norw. krone 

PWLoew 

PpumzWfy 

Portescw* 0 

Ron-robM 

Saudi rival 

SM.S 


Currency Per* 

S- AX. road 1*23 

5. Kor.uo* *^2“ 
sac&uwo UW 
TBiWOflS T1X ‘ 

Thai baflt Z5.1B ■ 

TurtUbUni 31574. 
UAEdMoM 3*728 

venez-boOv. W4M 


united Stole* 
mcwrtnk 

Prime rate 
FHerairoeds 
j^math CD* 

Comm- paper n* days 
Knandi Treasury WU 
l-recr Tt e a ni ry bM 


5-year Treasanr note 
7-tot TroftBirv note 
IS-yeor Treasury note 
30 -year Tmsonr Mad 
Morrill LndiMty Ready e 


rd llateo jmbt tbdor VO-Oav 

> XU*!, MOT HHto* C mrtocv 1JK0 1J8™ ,J89e 

hs ,K “ 

M - •' . 1 x 430 14437 

Si- -1J*» U823 IJU* BortoaComir^ftMel^m 

Va* «> ROV * *** 


DfMwofnrte 
CaUmOMV 
lOTmth uuerfcmh 

0- mOnlii derta* 
f^noaHi iotertaak 

ID- year Covet imieui hood 
BcrwBBT 
Loratant rate 
am mon ey 

1- mnnt» Interhaaic 
j-mon» Irttertao* 
tnoatti mtertw* 
tfrrear Bono 


IV* 

Bank tame rate 

5 U» 

SV. 

7U» 

Call mean 

41* 

fla 

4 4. 

l-motmi leferbook 

4 *. 

4 % 

443 

MwaHl lomonfe 

5V* 

5*. 

OS 

*-»nan*ti lotcrtonh 

54* 

5 V 

4.10 

it-narGDt 

840 

847 

447 

SJT 

655 

643 

6.99 

7 JO 
355 

Franc* 

Ifltai vaiillaa rate 

5 JO 

5J0 

Coll money 

5 t. 

5 !« 

Huaatti latertjonfe 

i>» 


Haaalti interbank 

5*4 

5"2 

frmatt UtierbanK 

5 X 

5 J. 

W-VOTOAT 

tta. 

7M 


Sources: Reuters. Bloomberg. Merrill 

1% 

Lynch. Bant of Tokvo, 

Commerzbank. 


2 V. 2 
2>v 3‘. 


Gnaruaeft Man toyu. Credit Lvonnots. 

Gold 


640 LOO 
5-05 5.10 


AM. 

PJA. 

Ch'gfi 

38+40 

383.45 

— lib 

38350 

384.10 

+-0J0 

38540 

389.00 

+240 


545 5.10 

545 SSS 


545 505 

- 742 A*T 


UJ. donors per ounce. Lonoon official hx- 
Ms; Zurich and New York bocning and da* 
Marten; New Yort Come* i August I 

Source -Rowers. 




Dollar Tumbles 
As Rate Gap 
Favors Europe 


Compiled by Our Stuff Fr.m Dirpuithn 

NEW YORK — The dollar fell 
to a six-week low against the Deut- 
sche mark on Wednesday as inves- 
tors looked for the interest-rate sap 
between the United Slates and Eu- 
rope to remain unfavorable for the 
U.S. currency in the near term. 

“The potential for U.S. rate 
bikes is not as great as it appeared 
to be a momh ago," said Kay Sin- 
den. an analyst at Bankers Trust. 
“The U.S. economy is slowing 
down, which means the Fed won't 
hike interest rates for a little while 
yet." 

Evidence of slower economic 
growth mounted on Wednesday af- 
ter it was announced that produc- 
tion at U.S. factories, mines and 
utilities barely rose in May. 

There was also reasonably good 
news about U.S. productivity and. 
as expected, inventories rose slight- 
ly in April while sales slipped. 

The Federal Reserve said indus- 
trial production posted a slight 0.2 
percent rise in May. with output of 


business equipment and construc- 
tion supplies barely offsetting the 
third consecutive decline in car and 
truck production. The figure had 
shown a rise of 0. 1 percent in April, 
revised downward from an earlier 
estimate of 0.3 percent. 

The size of ihe recent increases is 
down sharply from the last three 
months of 1993. when the economy 
expanded more rapidly than it had 
in a decade. 

The mood that is taking hold, 
some traders said, is that the Amer- 
ican economy is slowing dow n, and 
therefore no more interest rate in- 
creases are likely now by the Feder- 
al Reserve, while both the German 
and Japanese economies are clearly 
picking up. meaning do more inter- 
est rate declines in those countries 
are likely for now. 

Since, among other things, cur- 
rency traders chase the best interest 
rates and the growing economy, 
some have clearly concluded that 


See DOLLAR, Page 10 


OPEC Decides to Keep 
Output Limit Steady 


The A vaunted Press 

VIENNA — OPEC renewed its 
pledge Wednesday 10 keep oil pro- 
duction steady as pan of a strategy 
to force crude prices higher in the 
fall and winter. 

“The ceiling is unchanged." said 
Libyan Oil Minister Abdalla Salem 
Badri, the newly named president 
of the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries. 

The decision was announced at 
the end of the first day of the 
group’s summer conference. 


In leaving its supply guidelines 
untouched for the rest’of the year, 
the producers hope to drive prices 
up. 

The price of a barrel of crude oil 
has gained about $3 since the group 
agreed in March to limit its surging 
output at 24.5 million barrels a day 
ih rough the end of the year. 


With prices rebounding now. the 
exporting nations are anxious to 
leave well enough alone. They fear 
any move to tamper with the guide- 
lines could upset the markets and 
send prices in a downward spiral. 

Saudi Arabia’s influential oil 
minister. Hisham Nazer. has joined 
other ministers in endorsing the 
status quo. 

The kingdom is the world’s larg- 
est ^producer, supplying about 8 
million barrels a day, or about a * 
third of OPECs total output. 

The average price of a basket of 
seven crudes monitored by the car- 
tel was about $16 a barrel last week. 
While better than a few months 
ago. the marker is still well short of 
the S21 target. 

Light sweet crudes in the United 


See OPEC, Page 10 



ONLY ONE CHANNEL GIVES YOU 


MARKET NEWS AS IT HAPPENS. 



YOU SWITCHED OVER TO US. 


NBC 


CHANNEL. 



CHECK LOCAL TV UST/NGS FOR THE FUU PICTURE 
CNBC S 'MARKET WRAP' IS SPONSORED BY 




















MARKET DIARY 


DOLLAR: Gap in Rates Widens 


Continued tram Page 9 

the best opponuniiio will be in 
Japan and Europe. 

“It looks as though the dollar 
might be facing a new test." said 
John Lipsky. chief economist at 
Salomon Brothers. “The events or 
the past few weeks have increased 
the suspicion among investors that 

Foreign Exchange 

there will be no more increases out 
of the Fed right now. so ihe> look 
around somewhere else. Mean- 
while. the latest news has increased 
optimism about the recover.' of Eu- 
rope and Japan. Add thaL to the 
continued uncertain ty about for- 
eign policy developments, and you 
have a certain underlying skepti- 
cism about the dollar." 

The dollar fell as low as 1 .6340 
Deutsche marks on Wednesday 
and closed at 1.6365 DM in late 
trading, down from a close at 
1.6462 DM on Tuesday. 

Traders said that the dollars 
weakness on Wednesday may have 
been exaggerated by the U.S. cur- 
rency's decline against the Swiss 
franc amid speculation that Swiss 

interest rates were set to rise. 

"The Swiss francs rise against 
the dollar is dragging the dollar 
down against the mark." said Chris 


Furness, currency strategist at mar- 
ket consulting firm IDEA. 

The dollar fell to 1.3723 Swiss 
francs, weaker than the low of 
1.3810 seen last September. It 
closed on Tuesday at 1 .3870 francs. 

Hans Meyer, vice president of 
the Swiss National Bank, was re- 
ported to have said this week that 
there was little room for lower 
Swiss interest rates and a possibili- 
ty of higher rates. 

Signs that official German inter- 
est rates may not be cut in the near 
future have also undercut the dol- 
lar. A cut of five basis points in the 
Bundesbank's securities repurchase 
rale, a key money market rate, was 
in line with expectations. 

“The cut was consistent with (he 
policy of modest casing the 
Bundesbank's been Following, and 
there's no sign that it's going to be 
rushed into culling official rates." 
said Nick Siamenkovic. economist 
at DKB. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar dosed at 5.5840 French 
francs, down from a close at 5.6 145 
francs on Tuesday. Sterling rose to 

SI. 52 13 from Sl^»94. while the 

dollar was quoted at 102.70 yen. 
down slightly from 102.73 yen. 

fAP. Bloomberg. \)Tt 


Vo ^siocok’d 


ttW 


Daily closings of the 

Dow Jones industrial average 



m b' J F M A M 


1993 


1994 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open High Law Last Cub. 

' Tfil : .0 5 2531 ifl 37i3J5 379C <1 -2642 

I Trans icJSfl- l«tJ5 I«J5J1 1634 85 -A3 9 
iiT.1 I6sfl & ur.16 13S.67 itaJa — O.ri 
Cot Tip I37M 44 1X9 74 1318 09 131904 —7.41 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Standard & Poor's Indexes 


High Low Clow Cn'9e 
liWOSITinis 537.77 534. 18 534X7 — I.W 

Tronic. 401 43 396X4 J97JJ4 — JJ* 

UtilWts 15&4 8 157-23 - 1.20 

Finance J7.0J jabS 46.74 — 0.1a 

5P 500 4«X73 459.95 (eflXl — 1.7b 

SPIN iM.49 424.95 «5JJ — 2J4 


HIT 

NYSE Most Actives 


VoL High 

Lon 

Lost 

Cltg. 

infC-ame 

60*37 ?!••» 

19"» 

l®'5 

— IV. 

Etcvon 

41415 58+-, 

57 

rt- 

— 1»j 


33457 Sj’- 


U 

* 

P<*t>siC 

32591 324. 

31'. 

jj 

- 

Qwsir 

30514 Sl'k 

»■+ 


- 4* 4 

TelAAe'V 

23T*i3 y »\ * 

50‘ 7 

S9 

• g 

GerEls 

27630 Jfl' « 

4M» 

Jf’i 

— ' i 

Anal ana : 

25825 4S'*j 

47 Vl 

J8'. 


CntOds 

75379 15+, 

1-1+4 

IS'- 



?<932 31’. 

28' i 

» 


FaroM 

27340 4I’-, 

*4)1 . 

tJF. 

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22244 3b'. 

4 

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21057 5*'. 

SS'« 

56 


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35 



OPEC: Oil Output Limit Retained 


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Continued from Page 9 

Stales and Europe generally run 
several dollars a barrel higher than 
the OPEC' average. 

Oil prices tumbled late last year 
to their lowest levels in five years, 
pinching the producer nations, 
which depend heavily on crude 
earnings to fuel their developing 
economies. 

OPECs secretary-general. Su- 
broto. also said the ministers had 

U.S. Stocks 

decided against holding a meeting, 
as they usually do. in September. 
By skipping that session, the group 
wants to underscore its intention to 
restrain pumping and drive prices 
up. Their next conference will be 
Nov. 16 in Vienna 
Analysts estimate that the cartel, 
which often is far from its produc- 
tion goal, is pumping about 
300.PX1 barrels a day above its cur- 
rent ceiling of 24.5 million barrels. 

OPECs executive office had ad- 
vised the ministers that if produc- 
tion gets any higher, buvers could 
quickly build up their stocks of oil 
and that could lead to weaker 
prices. 

H Stocks Track Bond Slump 

U.S. stocks closed broadb lower, 
tracking bearish bond markets 
amid concerns the Federal Reserve 
will need to raise interest rales 
again in the face of rising commod- 
ity prices and a weak dollar. 
Bloomberg Business News report- 
ed from New York. 

The Dow Jones industrial aver- 


age fell 24.42 poinLs io 3.7^0.41. 
following four days of gain s. 

New York Stock Exchange trad- 
ing was active, with volume of 
269.72 million shares, down from 
2SU.38 million on Tuesday. Seven 
shares fell on the Big Board for 
every six that rose. 

Shares of oil companies were 
lower as crude oil prices rose to a 
□-month high of Sl ^.^6 a barrel, 
up 91 cents from Tuesday. Exxon 
fell 1 to 574. Texaco weakened '» 
to 63"*. and Chevron edged l > low- 
er to 44-’ 4 . 

“If these oil prices hold steady, 
pretty soon you would expect oil 
stocks eventually cjtch up and join 
the party." said Alvin Silber. oil 
analyst al Herzog Heine Geduld. 

Some investors used the decline 
as a chance to buy stocks at lower 
prices. “This market has gotten 
overly concerned about interest 
raies." Thomas Stevens, chief in- 
vestment officer at Wilshirc As-et 
Management. "Stock price.' have 
been gyrating all over the place a> if 
we have come to some kind of prec- 
ipice." 

Coil fell 5 1 ’ to I4 1 : after the 
stocks investment rating w-js re- 
duced by brokerages when the 
company made a disappointing 
presentation to analysis, prompt- 
ing a Lehman Brothers analyst to 
downgrade the stock to “neutral" 
from “buy." 

International Game shares fell 
1 to 19\ after the company jjid it 
was “comfortable with the lower 
end" of Wall Street analysts' esti- 
mates for the current financial 
year. 


NASDAQ Mosrt: Actives 


MYSS Indexes 


H«h Lon Ldsi CM 

Comeofu? :a « ?u.w JfJia —0.9? 

indusn'ak 313 62 311.44 XH.89 — Ml 

Iron*. 25106 24964 —123 

Ulilih 210.4a 2MJ9 208.8J -1.77 

Fdicxee :70.J6 710.17 710.53 —0.44 


XAS3AQ Indexes 


Metals 

cut 

Bid AIR 
ALUMINUM (HWftGredc) 
bailors per nutntl** 

Soot 1403-50 1404 JO 

Forward 1 431 5 0 1434.00 

COPPER CATHODES IHlOB 
Dolton per metric ton 
Spat 23770)0 Stt&OO 

Forward 2395. DO 7396X0 

LEAD , 

Dalian oer metric ton 
Seal SOSO HUD 

Fofvjfjrd SftD O 5 jt^0 

NICKEL „ 

Dalian per metric ton 
Scot 4045330 6355X0 

Forward 6441 JH W45X0 

TIN 

Denars oer mriric ion 
Spot 4560.30 S57GXQ 

Forward 5*<0X 0 5450X0 

ZINC tSpeciot High Grade) 
Dollars per metric Ion 
Spot 974J0 975X0 

Forward wjo lOOOXQ 


prev lass 
BKJ Aik 


141100 141400 
144 ZOO 144X50 
Grtflel 

ZJflOO 239500 
240*00 241000 


53450 Wl« 
551 00 55200 


638000 639000 
6(7500 648000 


543000 56300 
56*900 570000 


901 JO 9flX» 
100600 100700 


LS./ AT TflC 


Financial 


Hign Low Lost dig. 

CoTOPM'le 737.43 TJ.'6 *3426 —102 
mou-lriolv 749 ID 761.83 ^ 44.83 — I A* 

Bonks 761.62 763.00 760.4J -1.30 

Irvja-anoe 9I-1.27 91S2S sro*’ -245 

Finance- 95148 9MI.2J 95X22 — 1.28 

Trans®. 708.06 699 4*9 9j — 6J9 


AMEX Stock Index 


High Law Lost CM. 
443 54 441^6 443.70 —0.3’ 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bands 
10 Utilities 
10 industrials 


Close orge 

78.45 — 0.09 

«S*6 — 0X5 

101.45 007 


High Law Close Change 
3- MONTH STERLING (L)FFE) 
tSOS^M - pts at 118 PCI 


Jim 

See 

D« 

Mar 

Jim 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jdd 

5CP 

DOC 

MOT 


9487 

34.43 

9197 

9128 

9171 

912 

9178 

?t *8 

9UI 

9U72 

9083 

XLSC 


9403 

94J3 

93*8 

9300 

9143 

91.91 

91.33 

91.18 

90.98 

90.78 

9056 

9004 


9408 
9447 
9394 
73 27 
91M 


tOJH 
fan 
+ 022 
f 003 

♦ aw 


9tl6 +019 
91 J7 +0.]5 


91.41 

91.19 

90.98 

9077 

9053. 


Est. volume: 131555. Osen kn».t 539-339. 

J-MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE) 

51 million -m of ISO act 
See 
Dec 
MV 
Jim 

5 ”si. volumeVnS Open mt.:5J9*. 

3-MONTH EOROMARICS (LIFFE) 
DMl million - Pts of 1B0 pet 


-014 
+ 0.14 
+ 014 
+ 0.14 
+ 0.14 


HMI Law Last Settle WW 

i Sen 155JD 1SX50 vs<9s 15625 +100 

M 155X0 1HJ0 15825 19825 +1£ 

ug> 16080 158JD 16000 160L2S + L80 

□K 18100 16025 163.00 16100 +075 

Jta V417S MI2S 143-SO 16275 + 1.00 

E*f.vor*m*:7W. Ooon Inf. 85.982 

ggnssistayafLu-^*,, 
a is as ss its :s , 

S? 1AJ0 Wl24 16J2 I&83 +09 

Oct I6J81 1420 1672 1471 +045 - 

mV 1679 16.17 1L67 1673 -t-ftSO 

Dk 1678 16.18 1806 169 +046 

jS ILffl 1421 WJI 14-8S +0^ 

fS I9.T. N.T. N.T. 1689 +09 

Mtf 16.19 16. T9 16.19 1685 +0A3 

E5L volume: 51.191 . Oeen ln». 15B8B9 

hmo Lew Las Settle aw 

j Stock Indexes . 

i Hfefa L6w Close CfetoKN 

I FTS6 188 (LIFFE) 

, as per Meat pout 

' Jon 3DSOO 30238 M428 +38 

; sea mmpp 3D38J) 3QS48 +28 

D« NT. N.T. 30648 +38 

EsI. volume: 247831 Open M>.: 60.950. 

CAC4B (MATIF) 

FF298 per Index point 

Job 197380 104480 WOOD -+30J» 

Jot 1 972.50 194080 1949JD -+3B80 

Awe 1901 JO 1«81 JO I95BJ0 -+2LOO 
sSp 197150 I958J0 198680 -+30JC 

IK N.T. NT. 199580 -I- 3050 

(Mot N.T. N.T. 20080 -+J180 

j EM. volume. 30779. Oeen InL; 70424. 


icurCts: Motif, Associated Pross. 
London inn Pfnondol Futures Bxcftanoe, 
Inn Pa fr o Mu n Ercftonge. 


I Dividends 


9696 

9694 

94.9* 

9625 

9625 

9(25 

94B5 

9604 

9606 

93.76 

7X76 

9178 

H.T. 

N.T. 

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AMEX Most Actives j 


VOL 

High 

Lou* 

LQ4-* 

dig- i 

E'OViBoy 

k?OJB 

liT- 

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NYSE Diary 


i 

Close 

Prev. 

I iC'-CPlCCd 

9;+ 

I2®a 

inert 

11 “a 

075 

1 Mrcrasi'sv^ 

a": 

209 

' To'ol W.'l 

2515 

2*32 

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71 

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35 

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Mar 

Jim 

See 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

See 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


WJ 8 

9JJ38 

94JJ 

9426 

9196 

«ji 

9111 

91*5 

9179 

9162 


9582 

94J1 

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94.18 

9185 

« 1 »I 

93^2 

9135 

9389 

92.90 

9277 

<H4>2 


9£83 — 082 

9485 —382 

94 J9 —003 
9423 — 083 
9195 -Oil 
°U9 —382 

9349 — 0 X 1 

9123 —085 

9189 — 086 

92.94 —083 

92.75 — 12s 

9282 —084 


AMEX Diary 


Ar-o*v:«?o 

unotttMvd 
TOSfll l r rSU« 

?i.-,’4 Hinbs 

fie.v Lowi 


2U 

ft 

firs 


pts of tag pet 


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94.55 

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92-80 

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NASDAQ Diary 


Nobcrv 
CTicvSIl s 

TumBd 
•,'iocin rf 
l.-axCP 


M9S I'm 
4136 If, 
JBW 30* : 
jam l® 1 , 

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IJm LOa- 


One Prev. 
isar I56J 
I5?o 1530 
'925 1«20 

JCJI JOU 

116 97 

ion "j 


Spot Commodities 


Market Sales 



Tooar 

Prev. 


4:00 

cons. 

NVSE 

H+41 

143J7 

Ame. 

16 18 

?2>J3 

Nosdoa 

7)1-44 

7!0 533 


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Today 

Prev. 

| Alvr.in,.inn. id 

■3.627 

0.64+ 

Caller. SraA. lb 

1 18 

1 >9 

Copper elect r pi - no lo 

1.16 

i 14 

Iran FOB. ran 

71X00 

7I3.Cn 

Lead lb 

0J6 

0J6 

Silver. Ira. a: 

5505 

£J®5 

Steel (scrap* tin 

1I4T 

134 33 

T.n. IS 

? . . "J 

-.S3 

! :ir>e. lb 

94789 

C4«;e 


Es». volume: 94.971. Open im - 7 869.154. 
3-MONTH PIBDR IMATIF) 

FFSm 
See 
Dec 
Mar 
Jun 
Sep 
Dec 
Mar 
Jen 

ESI. volume: «.95E. Ooen ln».: 17(890. 
LONG GILT I LIFFE) 

00808 - SIS & 32nds Of 100 PCt 
Jan 132-M 101-1+ lOS-O! -0-IC 

5ep 101-09 10084 100-75 +M: 

Dec M.T. N.T. 99-25 -■ 0-IC 

ESI. vc'ume. 74.171. Open in!.: I301 o6. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 25D -MO - pn oUOQ pci 
Sep ?2^« ®]-5j 51 JC —547 

Dec 9li3 9123 91J7 -58S 

Est. volume: I36.9CQ. Cmen >m.: 0 13EJM5. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF) 
FF506P60 - ph OtlDO PCt 
SCB 11570 11480 115.40 —0.16 

Dec 11484 113.92 1UJ0 — au 

Mar 11+82 11482 7 11T3 —114 

Jun N T. N.T. N.T. UII31 

Esl. voIi.-me: 262.94 7 . Osen ini.: 121695 


Industrials 

Hloh Law Losl Settle aide 
GASOIL tIPE) 

U J. dollars per metric fcn-Jots of 100 tons 
Jul 1J2.QQ 14775 151 JO 1S1JC +'J* 

Aua 153.75 15: JC I5C7J 15X50 i JC 


CampBHY ptf Amt Par Rec 

IRREGULAR 

CareorolB HI Yla . .1258 6-20 6-38 

STOCK SPLIT 

Cam Core 1 far 30 reverse sdlf. 
intarmaanatlcs Gen 5 far + split. 

CORRECTION 

Fleetwood En:er * .14 7-1 8-10 

» -previously ree or tafl on June letti si la Da an 

incrtasaa amours not a reputar p c ym a wr . 

INITIAL 

CofleriP AOP « ^91 6-71 T-l 

j - approx amount per snore. 

SPECIAL 

RelisOle Am - .15 6-30 7-15 

INCREASED 

O A3 630 
O 80 25 o-CO 
Q .W 7-18 

REGULAR 


Forstmann Gets Western l J»on thik i. . 

week-old btd f rom slices i 

SSi fSSSSv. . a ym » <+«-**** 

35K=aBraess®l@gp 

larcnt company. New ^ 
ldegram and ftte 
First Data, based in l 

^ Of the package ■, - 

Srfwllu™ UnL. nm.aua «9 bU 

worldwide money-transfer business. . : y- .. ’;V;i •- 

MCI-British Telecom 

r OND0N (Reuters) — The U-S. DqJdrtmcm (Sf JOS^^ Wcd®^^: 
day aooroved MCI Cbmmnaications Corp.'&affifflice ’»«h.SntKh tde- ^ r. 
oormSicarions PLC with some residetions. aad ^ Jdasmsak*k.r. 
was confident that the SO hflii on allian ce 

VS 

art,” a worldwide idecomniunicalioQS venire to s«S« mufenasp^,.;; 

”%£ MO are ddighied that the Departnural dcaretF 

the allian ce. British Tdecotn said in a rSriMj'jHadi' ;- r : ‘ 

Concert b a measure of our confidence that an r yna tUU 2 ghaaflc^wai^t ;y 
cleared laier this year ” . * / 4 . ; ' - i-b. 

The alliance has beat approved by ujc British amhenfces. Tl» Dcmrt* . ' : 
meal of Justice decree provides for a 60-day comment penat Janai :i-' 
regulatory approvals from the Federal Gsffinnnicaljioas. €oamaissiCK _ - 
and the European Union are expected latebj&is vest! . :.-;i -l ; i -V-zV-.'iV': : 

L. A. Gear Names a New Pr^dfetit 








Excal Realty T<- 
Kenan TransFCT 
Trbnas Carp 


7-15 

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68 


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AT6T 

Ameritich Carp 
Arnrescs Inc 
CanPacLtdo 
Cccle- Prco 
htanc!temcn Ca 
Hrah ria Pius 
Lanaauer Inc 
MocKenaN Fin a 
Mercantile BASt-.-s 
Myftrt LaDs 
NYMAGIC I etc 
Cr.ental Ft4 Sov 
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Putrm aa- uSGv B 
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United Asset Mam 1 
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PHUJPSs Beyond Great Flops . a Lean Company Eyes Interactive Media 


Continued from Page 9 

world’s No. 3 recording compjny 
and an increasingly ambiliou* pro- 
ducer of movies, including the re- 
cent hii "Four Weddings and a 
Funeral." 

Philips Media is one example of 
how the parent company ha:- began 
expanding its horizons jfier years 
in which its primary goal-., were to 
slash employment and inject nev. 
energy into a fossilized corporate 
culture. 


When Mr. Timrr.er. the chair- 
man. asked the hejJa of the parent 
company's busiress units at j 
meeting several years ago to write 
down the names of their 10 biggest 
customers, many could not do so. 

Since then Mr. Timmer has 
brought in new blood — often non- 
Dutch. For example. Frank P. Car- 
rubba, an Antencan who had been 
a top er.ccusivc at Internationa! 
Business Machine^ Corp. and 
Hewlett- Packard Co., joined Phil- 


ips two years ago to oversee its 
technology and product develop- 
ment. Today, only four of 13 mem- 
bers of the management board are 
Dutch. 

Mr. Timmer ebminated 22 per- 
cent of Lhe company'* work force 
over the last four year*-. Philips 
dosed plants and sold assets. 

“We were too fat. and w e needed 
to moke our assets work harder.” 
said Dudley G. Eustace, the execu- 
tive vice president who was 


brought in two years ago from Brit- 
ish Aerospace. "The results have 
started to show through. But you 
can't cut costs forever without 
damaging the company, so we have 
to star, reinvesting in tbe compa- 
ny." 

Having seen its profits rebound 
last year to S 1 .05 billion from a net 
loss of S5 1 1 million in 1992, Philips 
is now feeling prepared to acL Ana- 
lysts expect to see a siring of medi- 
um-sized acaui si lions. 


SANTA MONICA, California (Btoorabtrg) — L.A. Gear Inc^ wirich_ _■ 
has had only one profitable quarter in the past four y^Sv^nnouncEd on. . 
Wednesday the resignation of its president, Mark GoldstorL- I-'f li' - 
Mr. Gokiston, 39, resigned to pursuerther business opporumioesv the ' 
company said. HewiUberej^acMby WiBiamBeafCT451;"wI»iadb^- ;; 
executive vice president and chief financial officer. ”--;' • ; x, . -•>' • 

L. A. Gear also said that it expected to trim its loss- hi the- seoeqd. V-fiV- 
quarter, compared with a yearago. Ii pretheted a tasof S13.7 talUco, Of- -^-3 
60 cents a share for the period, con^paied witbafces qf$I5imi0joa. " 

cents a share. Iasi year. The improvement was attributedto " >2 

the company’s children's fehted product line and sates of S19.2 Bgffipa hr' - .>• 
excess inventory to Wal-Mart Stores Inc. ■ .v/*,y ; -y . = ;^vyv" 

Emmis Buys 2d Station 

INDIANAPOLIS (Bloomberg) — fikmnis Broadcasting Coro.' said : 
"Wednesday that it had entered into an agreement to purchase the New f*.,- 
York City radio station WRKS-FM, known locally as “Kiss FM,’* from -.' - 
Summit Communications Group Inc. for S68 mUirig ... . V : 

Emmis Broadcasting owns and operates radio stations in. Los Angeies.-, ! IT. • ‘I . 
Chic^o. St Louis and Indianapolis, as wdl as the New York. station -V : 
WQHT-FM. It said the acquisition of WKXSFM, alrich s.sufajecr toV - - 
Federal Commnnications Commission approval, would give h two of the ' .*>_> - 
seven highest-rated radio stations in New York, according to die latest / 
Arbilron survey. r V. ’ ' 

For the Record • 

Chase Manha tt an Corp. said it planned u> buy badt as much' as S5i :.' ••• 
million shares, or 4.5 percent, of its stock- At current market prices, the- : -- 
buyback would be valued at nearly S336 unUkm. .. •_ . 1 . ua ; 

Best Products Co. ioc. said that it had ^merged from more than three /,. :, 
years of Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The catalogue retailer is - - , 
distributing about 563 million in cash and 32.6 xnilBoa shares of new ' 
common stock to its creditors, as well as warrants for up to.2J nuUm n 
shares. • • : ■ 

HAL Inc. has postponed bankruptcy court confirmation hearings until 'C; : ' 
late July while it addresses concerns of some of hs larges credhors; I 

including the primary holder of its preferred shares, over a reorgamzatipn ■: 4 

plan. UAL is the parent company of Hawaiian Airlines Iric. atid^West " ‘ " v 
Maui .Aijport Inc. ‘ , •' ’ ' ' ■ ■' - ^ “ (2Vtw 

el2 ’ _ 1 * 

BCE Inc. said its Tele-Direct Publications Inc.' 




Hong Kong. Terms were not disclosed, but-2GE amd.ihatr it expected 
revenues over the 10-year period of the initial agreement' to total SI 
billion. (fougfa-Ridtier} 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Secton scaio 

*-4«r5 L=- 


Ooen HOT LOW Cose 0*9 Op.im 


*B+nce Trnncr Prme June ): 

Close Prov. 


•'•c -luww: Pw. 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 
ACF Holdina 

AWwi 
AIM* Id 
Paso Nobel 
AMEV 

BolvWessanrn 
C5M 
D3M 
Elsrvler 
FoMier 
Glsr-Brocades 
HBG 
Heinekan 
Hoosovens 


M (0 
44 44*3 
9flJ0 96.90 

47.10 4680 
209.70 20980 

72.10 7280 
3880 3880 
W0 5500 
12780 137 JO 
165J0 1M.» 

1580 1580 
4410 48.40 
321 320 

71120 21600 
71.70 71.10 


Hunlcr Douglas 74 JO 74 
IHC Colond 3680 3680 
infer Mueller 
inn Nedertana 
TLM 


KNP BT 

KPN 

twdllovd 

Dee Grinten 

Pavnoea 

PlUlhn 

Polvorom 

Pooeco 

Rodamco 

Rollnca 

Rorenia 

Rovat Dufcti 

Stark 

I .Unilever 

-•Van Ommeren 
VNU 


4. WolterVKJuwer 11180 
. EOE index :4067B 
Preytaas : Oil J> 


82 Bt 
7IL70 78.70 
51.40 5180 
47 44J0 
50.10 50 

ULT 0 6980 
74 72J0 
4&20 48.40 
5280 5ZX 
7* 75 

119.10 119 
5080 5150 

121J0 121 JO 
B8J0 8150 
19190 198JO 

47.10 47 
19280 19380 

5180 52 

174-50 174.20 
112 


Brussels 

AG Fin NA — 
Almani) 7700 7710 

Arted 4600 4450 

Barco 2180 2250 

BBL 4170 4195 

Be li oer? 25125 24450 

C8P 17400 12525 

CMB 2400 3400 

CNP 2150 2160 

Cock Grill 1 86 189 

Catena 5650 5920 

Colruyl 75» 7520 

Delhalie 1364 1358 

Electrabef 5770 5770 

E led rail no 3725 J730 

GIB NA 

GBL 4460 4460 

Gevoert 9120 9100 

Gtaverbel (800 47an 

Immobei 3145 12oa 

Kredlelbonk 6740 4430 

Masane 1575 1580 

PetroFlna 10500 10475 

Pawertin 3ios 3150 

Recltcel 502 508 

Rovale Beige 5210 5230 

Soc Gen Bmqut 8240 fm 

Soc Gen Belgique 2275 2205 

Scftna 15325 15325 

Solvav 15100 13150 

Teuenderlo 10Z75 10275 

Trncletiel 9BB0 9880 

UCB 24175 24200 

Union Mlnlere 2665 2470 

WOOom Lll3 NA 6900 

S uirmt Stack Index : 7601.46 
revloos : 759583 



Frankfurt 

AEG 17617180 

Ailionz Hold 2422 2418 

Alim 627 JO 638 

AsXD 1023 1010 

BASF W2300JG 

0 tW 3563J4O0 

Bay. Hm bonk 427-M 427 

Bay Veretaaok 459457 JO 

BBC 670 685 

BHF Bank 39550 395 

BMW 703774210 

Commerzbank 3273300 

CpnHnenlql 2412412W 

Daimler Benz 732 740 

DcgusM 488 490 

D1 Babcock 224225J0 

Daufsche Bank 740JC735J0 

Douglas 530 555 

Dresdner Bank 381 377 

FeMmuehle 297 347 

F Kruno Haesch 216J0 211 

Harpener 
Henkel 
Hocniicf 
HaeCbsl 
Houmarm 
harlen 
IWKA 
Kail Sah 
Karflatft 
Koullitjl 
KHO 
Klarcfcner Werke 
Unde 
Lufttionsa 
MAN 

Monnesmann 
Metaiigesefl 
Muencti Rueck 
Porsche 
Prainaaa 
PWA 
RWE 

Rneinmelall 
Schorl ng 



Oom Prev. 


SEL 
Siemens 
Th risen 
war la 
veto 
VEW 
viag 

Volkswagen 

Wei lo 

DAX Index : 207400 
Previous : 2074 
FAZ Index 178149 
Previous : 786+8 


3M n 
<4®J06?360 
2S3J0 273 

310 314 JO 
KP.W5MU0 
Je 2 381" 
464466-50 
452 447 
955 955 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhlvma 

126 

12* 

Enso-Gulzell 

39 JO 

31 

Huh roman 

H3 

I/I 

nap. 

1000 

10 M 

Kvmmene 

no 

109 

Meira 

169 

144 

Nokia 

400 

395 

Pohlohi 

68 

4i 

Reuola 

8650 

8651 

Stockmann 

210 

20, 

HEX index : 168153 
Previous : 1*5753 



Hong Kong 


Bk East Asia 
Cothfrv Podllc 

Cheung Kong 
China Light Pwr 
Dairy Farm Infl 
Hang Lung Dev 
Hang Seng Bank 
Henderson Land 
HK Air Ena 
Hk China Gas 
HK Electric 
HK LOTUS 
HK Realty Trust 
HSBC Holdings 
HK Shang HtU 
hk Telecomm 
HK Ferrv 
Hutch Whampoo 
Hyson Dev 
Jnrdlne Math, 
jordtae Str Hkt 
Kowloon Motor 
Mandarin Orient 
Miramar Hotel 
New World Dev 
SHK Props 
Sielux 
Swire Poc A 
Tal Cheung Prps 
TVE 

Wharf Hokt 
Wing On Co inti 
Wtnsor tnd. 


iSJO 35-75 
11 IH90 
37 3725 
41.75 
10251 70.30 
1130 U10 
5150 51 JO 
4025 4025 
4250 43 

15.60 15-30 

24.10 24 
»J» 20 JD 
72-30 22.10 

85 04J0 

1X10 1X10 

15.10 15 
1380 14.50 

32 31 JO 
21 A 0 2080 
57 5A50 
29 JO »J0 
1-180 1480 
II 1 IJ 0 
2180 21 JO 
34 JO 24J0 
49 JO 49JS 
JT 8 3J0 
59 5SJ0 
1180 I 1 J 0 
3J0 150 
29.90 29.80 
1180 1180 
11.TO 11 JO 
9149 J2 


Johannesburg 

AECf - - 

Allech 
Anglo Amer 


Ear lows 
Blwoor 
BuffelS 
De Beers 
Drfefonfeln 
Gencer 
GFSA 
Harmony 
High weld steel 
Kloof 

Ned bonk Grp 
Randfonieln 
Rusahit 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Sosol 

Western Deep 


26 2SJ0 
121 121 
244 247 

38J0 3t75 
9 9 

47 47.25 
1181 IB-50 
64 *3 Vi 
1180 11.30 
118J0118JO 
24 JO 25 

, 28 29 

S4JS 55 
33 31 

42 42 

97 JO 97.25 
95JS 96 


253 25L25 
179 ISO 
Composite index : SnTM 
Previous : 5757.17 


London 


Abbey Non 

43 8 

631 

1 Aiiiea Lyons 

5.73 

535 

Aria Wlggtns 

174 

176 

Argyll Group 

X45 

1*5 

Jlss Brit Foods 

5.18 

5.1 B 

BAA 

US 

9.40 

BAb 

672 

4A5 

Bank ScaHatid 


m 

BOrctavS 

559 

SSI 

Bass 

5M 

5.14 

BAT 

4 14 

630 

BET 

1.18 

1 JD 

Blue Ora* 

2A2 

m 

BOC Group 

1JQ 

7 JO 

Boots 

5 JO 

532 

Bomter 

649 

639 

BP 

605 

407 

Brit Airways 

4 

1*4 

Bril Gts 

in 

1B9 

Brit Steel 

136 

136 

Bril Telecom 

3-72 

177 

BTR 

345 

156 

Cable Wire 

640 

634 

Cadbury Sch 

647 

645- 

Ca radon 

117 

3.16 

Coats Vi veilo 

234 

w. 

Communion 

5.18 

513 

Court aukis 

LOB 

5.15 

ECC Group 

331 

ISO 

Enterprise Oil 

690 

192 

Eurotunnel 

3.23 

132 



Close 

Prev. 


139 

1.47 

Fane 

736 

2JS 

3^1 ACC 

3107 

5-50 

7.98 

5*9 


536 

S6J 


438 

431 

GRE 

1.03 

139 


tM 

6/1 

GUS 

5.77 

5-H1 


2-56 

2.5. 


14A 

IA- 


7J7 


ICI 

720 

7 9t 

Inchccoe 

4A3 

447 

kingfisher 

5.12 

S.10 

Lodbrake 

1^4 

IA 

Land Sec 

6.25 

635 

Laporle 

732 

IM 

Lasmo 

1-43 

1 M 

Legal Gen Ore 

4*3 

4*2 

Uoydx Bank 

5.60 

5 67 

Marks Sp 

611 

4.13 

MEPC 

627 

434 

Natl Power 

632 

64« 

.Not West 

4.72 

664 

NfhWgl Water 

4.92 

69)5 

Pearson 

6J0 

6l« 

P 8.0 

6-40 

04 

Pilkingtor) 

1.79 

137 

Power Gen 

4.90 

430 

Prudential 

xn 

Zfl 

Rwik Ore 

198 

194 

RecklH Cal 

5.96 

5JI6 

Redland 

4.91 

691 

Peed Inll 

619 


Reuiers 

4.76 


PMC Group 

0.46 

SL57 

Polls Ravce 

1-88 

l.®6 

Rothmn (unlit 

606 

4-1*9 


4.11 

606 

RTZ 

830 

8*7 

Sains bury 

3.96 

X90 

Scot Newca* 

5.15 


Scot Power 

2j*4 


Stars 

1J1 


Srvtm Trent 

530 


Shell 

7.12 

/.I3 

Slebe 

5JQ 

173 

Smith Nephew 

1J7 

1J2 

SmlthKline B 

4.19 

4,0/ 

Smith (WH1 

4.91 

4.92 

Sun Alliance 

127 

333 

Tale & Lvie 

436 

4J4 

Tesco 

1T9 


Thorn EMI 

I0JQ 

10*9 

Tomkins 

2.28 

X24 

T5B Group 

733 

XI® 

Unitever 

1038 

10.00 

Uia Biscuits 

336 


Vaaafona 

5.12 


War Loan 3W 

41*7 

41 

Wellcome 

6.17 


Whitbread 

5*1 


Williams HdSS 

334 

XS7 

Willis Corroon 

15S 

156 

F.T.30 indek : 2399J8 


Prevtwn ; 73m 


Madrid 

BBV 3125 3135 

Bco Central Htso. 7745 2830 

Banco Santander «WO 5020 

Banes to 1040 1055 

CEPSA 3721) 3330 

Drooadas 2190 2255 

Endesa 4250 4350 

Ercros 255 269 

Iberdrola 975 1000 

Reuaol 4115 4185 

Tasocolero 3720 3825 

Telefonica 1850 I860 

I MEWr'" 


Milan 


Banco Cortim 
Bos loot 

Benencn group 

Ciga 

CIP 

Cred I tal 
Enichem 
Ferfln 
Ferfln Rise 
Ftal SPA 
Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFI 

I la teem 
I taigas 
Italmobillare 
Medtaftcritt 
Montedison 

Ollwetll 
PI roll 1 
RAS 

Rina seen le 
Salpem 


4950 5100 

161 165 

25450 25450 
1063 HJ94 
2530 2530 

2180 2150 

2900 2970 
1910 1970 
1180 1703 
6355 6500 

1930 1950 
42900 43100 
24600 25200 
1S300 14970 
5315 5360 
43800 44500 
15200 15400 
1375 1419 

2500 2540 

5000 S090 

2790Q SOT 

10045 10850 

389Q 3900 


Son Paolo Torino *980 18010 


SIP 
SME 
Snla 
Slando 
Slel 

Tara A55I Rise 
MIB Index j m« 


<255 4J95 
3930 3970 
23*0 2510 
38000 38000 
5220 5435 
28300 29900 


Previous: 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum ir>» 32+1 

Bank Montreal 23 23*6 

Bell Canada 47>» 47M 

Bombardier B 20-Tfc 

Cammor I8?b 181+ 


Cascades 
Dominion Te*1 A 
Donohue A 
MacMillan Bi 
Nan Bk Canada 
Power Corp. 
Quebec Tel 
Quebecor A 
Quebec&r B 
Teleglobe 
Unlvo 
Video iron 
Industrials Index : 
Previous : 187X74 


Close Prev 

7'* 

r-j 6 - 
li'? il- 
ia io< 

a 


ia . 
1B>9 18^r 


Paris 


Accor 473 670 

Air Ltaulde 769 772 

Alcatel Aisitxxn S99 40+ 

Axa 252 257.20 

Bancalre iCiel 524 544 

BiC 1250 1255 

BNP 243 240-50 

Bauvgues 6lM 624 

BSN-GD 835 838 

Carretour 1846 lBtJ 

C.C.F. 233 225 

Ceres 108.10 11Q-S0 

Char gears 1415 1440 

Clmer.ts Franc 30A10 384 

Club Med 417 417 

Ell-Aaullalne 398.70 4XL60 

Ell-Sand I B32 821 

Euro Dlsnev 3A30 35JD 

Gen. Eaux 2280 2340 

Havas 43L20 42540 

ImelaJ 543 540 

Lafarge Cappee 4O4.l0 4Q9.ia 

Legrond 6080 6200 

Lvon. Eau» S16 522 

Oreol [L ] 1117 fl45 

L-VJIlLH. 850 870 

Matra-Hachetle T1ILB01MBB 
Mlchelln B 226 22940 

Moulinex I3«.7n 137 

Paribas 37X40 379 JO 

Pechlnev Inti 151 152231 

Pernod- R I card 369J0J74J0 
Peugeot 816 826 

Plnaull Print 889 

RadlOtectHilaue 465 468J0 

Rh- Poulenc A 131.W 13A80 


Raft. SI. Louis 
Saint Gabain 
sTe.b. 

5le Generate 
Sum 

fhomson-CSF 

Total 
UALP. 

Valeo 
CAC 48 index: 196639 
Previous : 197951 


1602 1619 
629 433 

513 522 

601 608 
284 28X80 
163 165 

314.20 32CJD 
145 147-90 
248.40 2S5 



Close Prev 

Esselte-i 

1 ir 

118 

Harceisbanlen 

97.50 

o- 

invesicr B 

181 

180 

dors* H.-aro 

724 

722 

ProibfO.o 6F 

174 

t?3 

Sandvik B 

114 

113 

SCA.A 

no 

no 

S-E Bonken 

<8.80 

NA 

Sk.anala F 

113 

IIJ 

Skomka 

165 

165 

SKF 

139 

734 

Slora 

374 

299 

Trelleborg BF 

117 

113 

Volvo 

7J6 

NA. 


186*46 

Previous : USl.lt 



1 Sydney 


Arrtcar 

9-40 

9*0 

A NX 

616 

613 

BHP 

1X88 

liTO 

floral 

3*4 

140 

Bougainville 

090 

0*8 

Coles Mver 


645 

Coma lea 

553 

5*2 

CRA 

I4LB4 

I8.»6 

CSR 


4*7 

Fosters Brew 

1.10 

1.11 

Goodman Field 

US 

134 

ICI Australia 

11 

law 

Magellan 


1.90 

MIM 


332 

Nal A ust Bank 


11.14 

News Cora 

9.03 

?jn 

Nine Network 

6/1 

4 j'4 

N Broken H, li 

3j56 

366 

Pac Dunlop 

433 


Pioneer inn 

X94 

X98 

Nmndr Poseidon 

238 

235 

OCT Resources 


1*5 

Sonias 

686 

I’D 


2*7 

X42 

Wesiem Mining 

8.44 

840 

W esi doc Banking 

644 

4*4 

WoodshJe 

4-50 

4*8 

All ordlowies iDde 
Previous : 7076*e 

«: 2075*0 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brosll jv.99 3760 

Bones oo 18.10 17 Jo 

Brades co 14JO 14 

Brohmo 56 564 

Cemlg 158 156 

Eletrobras 499.98 483 

I Kmoanco 480^64354)1 

L'ehl 512 505 

Poranapanema 4050 41 

Pelrobros 234 35 

SovnoCrux 1X200IXI50 

Telebras 86 85 

Teleso 775 740 

Usiminas X6a X5B 

vole Rio Ooce 223 330-50 

vortg 234 230 

Bovespa Index : XL677 
pnxlaas : 3*173 


Singapore 

Cerebas 
Citv Dev. 

DBS 

Fraser Weave 
Gentlng 
Golden Hope PI 

How Par 
Hume Industries 
incncape 
Keoaei 
KL K.epgng 
Lum Chang 
Malovon Banks 
OC8C foreign 
OU 0 
OUE 

Sembawang 

Shangrllg 

51 me Dorhv 
5IA foreign 
Swe Lana 
STpare Press 
Sing Slromshlo 
SVOre Telecomm 
Smalls Trading 
UOB foreign 
UOL 


B25 8.15 
7J5 7.75 

uro nro 

1840 18J0 
184)0 18J0 

2J9 155 


112 
565 
5 JO 
11 
IM 
1.49 
860 


330 

560 

5JS 

11 

128 

143 

860 


5 trails Times iqd, 
prevtoax ; 237x3* 


1170 13J0 
6^5 630 
8J5 X35 
NA. 11.10 
520 5.15 
■MM 3.98 
1X20 1220 
7 JO 730 
16 16.10 
4.10 4.12 
3J8 142 
160 170 
1X10 1160 
220 217 
; 2284-51 


Stockholm 


AGA 
Aseo a 
A stra A 
Allas Copcg 
Eiectroiur b 
E ricsson 


3(r 

600 594 

164 164 

9+50 93J0 
381 378 

401 398 


Close Prey. 


Toronto 


ASiiibi Price 
Agnica Saaie 
Air Canada 
Alberta Enera, 
Am Bar rick Res 
BCE 

Bk Nava Scoba 
QC Gas 
BC Telecom 
Brorrwlea 
Br’jnsvrlct 
CAE 
Comdev 
CIBC 


17 
14 - 
6 ’: 
rr- 

AJ'-i 

4’-* 
24 
1 J-v 

23- j 
02 J 
10 
6’4 
Jlj 
28^5 


Canadian Pacific 2tFs 


’’if 


Tokyo 


AkaJ Eleclr 
Asahi chemical 
A30M Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Casta _ . 

Dal Nippon Print I960 1990 
Dalwa House 1570 1570 
Dai wa Securities 1820 1840 
Fanuc 
Full Bank 
Full PhPta 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Coble 
Honda 
I la Yofcoda 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kallma 
Kansat Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 

KuOOta 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec inds 1B80 19)0 
Matsu Elec Wi 1160 1160 
Akltsublshi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasel 
Mllsubt^il Elec 
Mllubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Cara 
Mitsui and Co 
MltsukOShi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 

Ntkka Securities 1370 1380 
Nippon Kogaku 1110 1100 

Nippon Oil 
Nippon Sleet 
Nippon Virion 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Olympus Optical 1190 1210 

Pioneer 2980 2960 

ElCotl 
Stxiyo Elec 
Shore 
Shlmccu 
Shlneiw Otcm 
Sony 

Sumliomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum! Marine 
Sumliomo Metal 
Talsel Con* 

Tolsiw Marine 
ToVeda Cnem 
TDK 
Tallin 

Tokro Marine 

Tokyo Elec Pw .... 

Toppan Printing 1510 1550 
Toray ind. 758 764 

Toshiba 
Toyota 
Tamaichl Sec 
a: « ;aa 

Nlkbet 225 : 217*3 

g5SS.”:€. 

PrcvtoHS : 1783 


510 515 

780 781 

1770 1280 
1640 1640 
1670 1680 
1790 1780 
1340 1350 


4800 4740 
7330 2340 
2320 2320 
1130 1140 
1080 10*0 
930 9M 
190C 1970 
5160 5260 
738 743 

717 736 

9*4 978 

2620 2631 
412 415 

1200 1190 
983 955 

747 748 

6900 6880 


2750 7740 
526 524 

691 700 

798 812 

1200 1210 
622 837 

1090 1070 
1980 2010 
1260 1260 
1070 1070 


766 776 
362 366 

651 654 

871 BB3 
2470 7490 
86000 85800 


«81 1010 

564 583 

1850 1530 
766 763 

2270 2230 
6320 6330 
2180 2230 
525 527 
985 995 

» 302 

695 701 

881 8 63 
1180 1190- 
4880 4910 
§56 554 
1350 1350 
3200 3190 


847 860 

2170 2150 

«84 989 


Con Tire A 
Cantor 
Cara 

CCL Ind B 
Ctnepiex 
Comlnca 
Con west E*pl 
CSAMigi a 
Do Iosco 
Drier A 

Echo Bav Mines 
Equity Silver A 
FCA Inll 
Fed ind a 
F letcher Chal 1 A 
FPI 
Geniro 
Gull Cda Res 
Heps mu 
Hem 10 Old Mines IJ.O. 


4.90 

22 '-! 

23*. 

ll'« 

SO'-j 

085 

144m 

0 J 2 

3J5 

6 s * 

17*6 

5>n 

047 

4JS 

134m 


Holllnger 
Horsham 
Hudson's Boy 
Irrxuco 
tnca 
Jonrock 

LDbOtl 

Lablaw Co 
Mockenjle 
Magna Inti a 
M aoie Leaf 
Mortilme 
Mark Res 
wolson A 
Noma Ind a 
N oronda Inc 
Noranda Forest 
Norcen Energy 
Nttwi Telecom 
Novo Care 
Oshawa 
Poourln A 
Placer Dame 
Poa> Pel r oleum 
PWA Core 
Rayreck 
Renaissance 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Roval Bonk Can 
Scaprre Res 
Scoffs Hasp 
Seagram 
Sears Can 
Shell Con 
Sherrill Gordon 
SHL Svstemhse 
Southern 
Soor Aerospace 
Slelco A 
Tollsman Enera 
Teck B 
Thomson 
Toronto Domn 
Torstar B 
Tronsalia UMI 
TronsCda Pipe 
Trtlon Flni A 
Trimot 
Trliec A 
Unlcnn* Energy 


16 '* 
194s 
371. 
J«i* 
35* 
15\< 
21 L. 
214k 
Six 
601* 
1116 
25 
hr 

5 

254* 

12 '. 

14'4l 

42-.* 

11*1 

20 

JJ5 

31'.. 

tow 

0.J6 
17V. 
29»* 
193* 
69 Vr 

26+t 

13V* 
8'. 
42 A. 
7*1 
J3!u 
111* 
9’m 
18Vr 
15'+ 
8 

27ts 
24 U 

159i 
20 H 
24'm 
14V* 
17'b 
41 m 
15^. 
0J4 

U5 


ir- 

it'- 
0-4 
21 ' : 
33'* 

3i'l 

143. 
2*’-s 
DJo 
10 « 
6»1 
5 

Ml 

2tP. 

11*5 

78*5 

4.10 

« 

4.95 

23 

a 

IV. 

21 

0-83 

15 
0J0 
380 
6*» 

ir* 

r* 

0.46 
4A0 
13%. 
12 in 
16Vfc 
191 m 
28 
3Ti 
35W 
1SV; 
213* 
22 
83* 
601. 
113. 
251* 
sv» 
22 >* 
5 1 * 
3534 
12 '-. 
144* 
42+5 

m* 

20 V* 

Ttfl 

30k5 

ia>+ 

0^8 

17-V, 

X 

I9»* 

ri 

27 

I'M* 

83* 

O 

7** 

421* 

119* 

99* 

IBM: 

16 

BW , 

279* 1 

343m 

15=m 

209* 

231* 

I4'6 

179* 

«J0 

ISVj 

0JS 

1A5 


i:;:r 

H.3* 

Lr.-. Os+rt H^r. 

LCS 

C-344 


Grains 


WHEAT I CBOTI 


236 

176 Ju;«4 13? 1- 


7 4? ; ■ ~.:r. 


-0? 5ec93 3 45 IM - 

IX 

14': -134 .3-57 

115 

3 0« Dec 74 3 6: 3*5 

15» -■ 

33° -;ji : 

364 

3JT Ma ’5 :•*: . 

339 

it: , • : j3>, :*a« 

j*s .- 

LI6'-. Vovri Jil 355 

L « 

3" -3.i!‘-. » 

1C' 

3.11 ,iuH5 137 Ui 


3J* - ; C4 1 J4i 


Dec ’5 


j r -SC7 ; : 

Ea. sates NA Tue's.scte. 11 7i* 


Tue'-ooenw M lit UP 1C6 



WHEAT IrBOT) i XL t)j rntf/T^in* 

or ; Lrt!\- 

233 

X97 XI 94 3 A iST 


347 -ia;-. i;.5?5 

US'! 

3 02 v ;Seo 94 153', 333 

ir-. 

I-' -:U . 63P- 

3*0 

J 17'; Dec 9< 33? 139 

13T-, 

33a’: -OS', i 51? 

2*9 

125 .'*ar9j 3J91 ; is?': 

217 

237 -323; LTB 

3*4'; 

3J|S;May75 


3.48’. -3.0<r-. S 

333 »i 

3J2'cXi95 


as -3tl 55 

Ev. soies N.A Tues. sales 5.932 



Tue's own im Z7.I64 UP 731 



CORK (CBOTI V.OR rt-AnsrvTv txiv^ 

116'; 

2*1 XI 94 28? 234 

230 

-83 -QJM>, 91.513 

2.92'. 

2*C'gSeoW 278 279V. 

275*.: 

X75X -0*4’, 36-9J9 

XTJi, 


217 

27!'. -ftOe"j H.«37 

2 7S5| 

248’.Mor95 277V, 280 

2J7 

277 V: -03S6. 10 Jil 

182 

233 May 95 261 'r 283 

2306 

2XF- -(LOT, 1 634 

28)", 

254 Xi 95 281 2*4' j 

23! 

18151 -0 05'.. 3-033 

X67 

255 Sea 95 



2.59 

243 Dec 258 2*1 ’.i 

ia 

239k, .0U-. 3.238 


T.+ scs+--ri 54.3: JO Ti: 

SUGAR-WORLD 1 1 INCSB • I LC* cc - ee-», acr t 


La Z 

I .5X1 »4 

12J7 

lir 

12J4 

:XD 

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1233 

1241 

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11*5 

12J2 

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JjT’.'Cv 95 

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1204 

11-96 

11.98 

- — 0J4 6145 


i:.srx:9j 

i: M 

1200 

11.95 

I) « 

-0.01 1,526 

Si 

IL57DC ; 5 

1135 

11-90 

•1JS 

11.90 

—0*1 

733 

3Z 

itSSr.Mrst, 




11W 

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# 


Esi.KOn NA. Tue’s-sotas 44.945 
Tue s acerum 20.966 off 210 
SOYBEANS ICBOD UDDowurum-aH+it 


7J0 

735 

7081: 

7JP.4 

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7.02' . 

7JC'.« 

7J3 

6-509; 


5.94 '-i All 94 7.10 

6J8 Aug M 73* 

AI7 Sep 94 7.00 
555 V> Nov 94 6JU 
6.13 Jan 95 A95 
616 Ntar94 697 
621 MOV 914.97 
6J4 Jut 95 7.01 W 7.Q4 
161ViN»95 6 35 647 


'boM 


7.15 7.03 

7.12V; 73)1 
7J3 697 

6.93 V? 682 
696V, 617 
7.00 694 

7311 693 

6«* 

635 

Esi. vales NA Tue s. sties 50.134 
Tue'sooenint 152.7*4 up IT60 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) inm-ptriie tm 
23000 I85JDJUI94 20900 20900 2Q5J0 205.70 -650 23.583 

22100 16500 Aue 94 20*00 70900 20A20 20620 -SAO 17.99* 

71000 163. 10 See M 707.50 208-50 3)600 70600 - 170 10.961 

20600 180100 Oct 94 207.00 20700 204.00 30500 -610 5.750 

20900 I7*60C«C94 70600 207.00 2000 204 A) .640 16056 

201 JD 17180 Jan 95 20650 30eJD 20470 20470 .&J0 U16 

203J0 I0IOO Mar 95 207 JO 207 JO 20150 205 70 - 580 1.749 

20U» 161 J* MOV *S 207 DO 20700 20500 2Q5J0 ,630 493 

198 JO 15200 JW 95 20500 70150 20500 20500 -7 JO 786 

Ed. sates HA Twe**. wlei l6h77 
TucTsDoenmi 80.116 

SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) emK.iwnw ioot&. 

21J4JUI94 3*05 2640 2780 2781 

2805 27.78 T7J9 


70S' J *0.144* 46 TBS 
701 S? -0.U'; 18,167 
693 * 0.1V, 9.643 

6*J'« -X18 67J99 

tJF': >0T4 5 Adi 

69* V. -0J0 IMS 
693W -O.IS 1 - 1.588 
69*’, ,61* 1895 

*J*'j -010 1J6I 


21.65 Aug 94 2630 


3085 
3034 
2JJ4 
2887 
2656 
2600 
28 05 
2785 

2*55 .... . 

Est. soles NA Tue's. sates 11720 
Tue'i open ini 84JM3 


2200 Sep 94 2615 2122 27 Ji 77 JS 

221000 94 27J5 27.90 27 AS 2744 

2X00 Dec 94 27 JO 77*0 37 JO 37.22 

2285 Jan 95 27 iS 77 Jr 27.15 27.15 

7470MIX9S 77 JO 27.« 77 OS 2785 

24 62 May 95 27 JD 27J9 27 05 27 05 

I4ASJUI95 77.10 77 Jj E- JO 77.00 

2580 Aug 95 2*95 2695 36.95 24.95 


*632 21.374 
*0-30 15^70 
-637 10,799 
• 634 7.951 
‘084 21,797 
-645 ’916 
-082 3.24* 
*650 1.127 
•OJO 776 
*085 8 


Livestock 


isssmur* 


Zurich 


Ad la inti B 
Alysotese B new 


225 

475 


l& c f rw,Bovfl I*'? mi 


Clba Gelav b 
CS HoJdlng* B 
EFefctrov, B 
Fischer B 
Inlerdlscaunl 0 
Jelmall B 
Landis Gvr R 
Moevenolek B 

Nestle R 

Oerlik-BuehrleR 
Pargesa Hid B 
Ractip Hag pc 
jotre Republic 
Sandoz B 
Schindler B 
Sutter PC 
Surveillance B 
5 wbs fink carp B 
Swiss RcFnsur R 
Swissair o 
UBS 8 

WlnfenhurB 
Zurich Ass B 
SBS Index -»56J2 

Prevtous : «682 


840 855 

575 
373 374 
1375 1355 
2350 2350 
835 850 

845 850 

450 

1160 1182 
143 141 

1630 1630 
*740 * 740 
123 124 

746 730 
8100 8150 
336 925 
M30 7030 
»S 400 
381 S92 

.TV J 7 * 

1174 1202 
717 730 

1359 1373 


Sea our 

Education Directory 

every Tuesday 


CATTLE ICMER1 AADbs-cniHpcib. 

7677 62JQ JlXI 94 *440 A5J0 *407 *5.10 

7187 *X15Aua 94 6150 MJD *110 *4JS 

7610 6STOOCt«4 *690 *800 M«0 <707 

74 JO 67 JO Dec 94 *620 *9.00 <7.90 4A9J 

7425 47.90Feb95 «*A0 *987 mm *9 gn 

'5.H 49.40 Apr 95 70 40 71 00 ?6I0 7695 

7I.SD *6.90 Jun 9J 57.90 £7.90 6’.90 £7.90 

Est. *aes 14. s^! rue's. sc*w 16217 
Tue' s open jrx TTJMl ofl 900 
FEEDER CATTLE (OWBtl JO.00* Bv- 0 -+. bw b. 
BUB 71. 10 Aug 94 JtOS 7270 71 J5 7X37 

1170 7TJ0Szp94 71^5 TIM 7|jjo 72 in 

BUS 71 JO Oct 94 71J6 72JS 7695 rsrs 

7165rtov94 7X90 7150 7240 TUB 

Mov ¥5 7150 TJ0 72J5 7130 

72.95 Jan 9* 7X20 74JL5 7295 74 JO 

72 J5Mor 9* HJO 73JO 73X0 75.55 

7645 Apr *4 7125 7235 7125 73 JQ 

Esi. sow* 3430 Tue's. sows 2.07* 

Tue's reenW 14.10 ott M 
HOGS (CMEAl Amb.iz+.M.L 
5627 45J0Jun94 47JS 48J7 47 Jg *6.a 

d 5 JO XI 94 J7J0 4&JS CIS 48J7 

*450 Aug 94 47 JS 47.90 47 JJ 47JS5 

474500 94 4420 *4.75 *41$ 44JJ 

4105 Dec 94 4445 *420 41J$ 4478 

«.10Feb»S 44.12 44JS 4*J$ 44.17 

4690 APT 9$ 4100 41X 4100 COO 


8600 

80 95 
8025 
75.85 


*638 5.212 
*015 29.914 
* 6 « 1 45545 
653 10361 
-660 7 im 
-OJS 3.252 
•0JS <22 


-0JJ 4,951 

—667 JJSt 
— 0XH 12*7 
-020 1.719 


-005 
— <L30 
*020 


55J7 
SWO 
49.75 
JO JO 
5680 

4*191 _ _ ____ 

51 SO iviOJunOS 4Sio 48.70 4447 «A5 

J9jBJ <720X195 «-75 4675 46J6 <4.70 

Eil soles 5 J51 Tub's wdes *.77* 

Tue's wwn ml 27^54 «l 508 
PORK BELLIES (CMERI «unofc*.-rfyr>«yu. 
*209 J9J0M M <1.40 4100 JUS <22D 

51.50 ,3675 AU9 ¥4 4660 4225 40*0 4183 

41-15 39.10FNt¥J 47.90 «J5 47J5 47 70 

KJ.90 38.40 MOT 95 47 80 

*IJ» 47^0Mav¥5 <9.95 

53.00 5650 Jul ¥5 5620 

».!5 49.75 Aug 9S 50 10 

ea sales 2A7< Tue'6 sates i.bo* 

Tue's oocnint 6323 UP 72 


-618 1J75 
-0J0 6.724 
673 
*025 A330 
*C.IS XZ2¥ 
tfl.05 777 
40* 

*615 J49 

-620 4> 


•640 421*3 
*680 X£S8 
488 
37 
31 
12 


Food 

COFFEE C (NCSEI UJa tr.- arJ-. pet b 
l-UJO 44 » Jul W U5J0 I460S 13425 11610 

1C.90 46$B Sep 94 115.90 13980 1342$ 1 3820 

13725 n.lOOecM 13350 137 00 I37J0 134.15 

llAOO 76.90 MW *5 130X 13190 17925 13285 

13325 12-50 Moy 95 1X00 13IJ0 13080 13X00 

13600 SUDJulK 131.00 

lUOa 89 jo Sea fS ixoo 

esi. soles IMO! Tue's. ades I6OT 


— 635 11-006 
•QJO 74.174 
*14$ 12225 
♦I JO 7820 
+ 1J5 UK 2 
*ias 133 
*125 X 


Esrsc.es 14.144 Tue tides 11200 
Tje'i ■sen.fsi I36JI2 C*t £04 
COCOA (NCSEI lirrvr-i env- isc^'an 
1446 «9ju(<u 1354 U*i 1353 

1445 IZQStPta 1362 1419 1382 

7 $37 1541 Dec «4 1471 14*0 1*21 

’5*? ir~."ACr45 US? '*83 IJS2 

;n T0787.1oy«5 1475 1504 1500 

Irii 1225 3U) 95 1495 1505 UTS 

■rjz 1265 Sep ¥5 
1573 1^0 Dec «5 

l*r IJSMor 9* 

Es: scies 14.048 Tue's-sales 1 5. 1*2 
Tuesepentit 1^50 alt *531 

ORANGE JUICE INCTN) lUMos-amot' 
1 35-20 9?JS XI 94 «5J0 9720 9500 

134J0 »4CaSeo9< 9X50 1 01 JO 9620 

1*4-00 9AJ5Nav94 loam 101JO ¥9.80 

13XCJ 97.70 Jan ?S HCJO 10125 1 02. CO 

13*25 ¥9JSMor95 104J6 '.05.10 10320 

11*25 lOOJOMavVS 10*25 10*25 I0»25 

11*00 16500 JUJ 95 

11IJD HIJ0Eep9J 
Nov 95 

Es. sales xooo Tug's, tales IJ32 
Tue's ooen *rt 23.124 


1377 

1411 

1+48 

1477 

1494 

1518 

>S38 

1571 

1*07 


9570 

9645 

10610 

10X20 

imro 

105 JO 
10720 
10670 
10670 


-18 9.097 
*24 33.9*0 

* 19 10J8I 
■ 19 7.907 

♦ 19 XW9 

-19 X346 
*19 1.170 
*19 1177 
4 19 3 


»0J5 7,834 
*635 9.144 
*0.15 1258 
*620 1052 
— 0J0 1,160 
—ass 
-OJ5 
— 0JS 
— 0J5 


Season season 
rfigh Low 


Open High Law base Cbn Op. tat 


—*3443271 
— S039A4E6- 
-W274289 
-«*209Jm 
-60195.742. 
— XIMJM ■ 

--roixuat- 

9MS . 


2* 34,153 
*2* 275 

-34 IS . 



Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCMX1 



irtit 

74.10 Jun 94 1X9.90 

1)0*0 

IC9.M 


.0*0 



7620X1 W 109x0 

170*0 

108*0 



Tll-80 

74.90 Seo 94 109 JO 

110.70 

109.10 

H030 

+03S 172/9 

109.90 

7i75D«:94 10X40 

10900 

107JC 




10/ J5 

76 «0 Jan 95 108.00 

108X0 

108.00 


*025 


107.00 

71th Fee 75 







TJXOMa’95 107.00 

10730 

167X0 




107X0 

76*5,vujy95 10630 

10630 

10630 


* 023 




10650 

10650 





7SJ0Aub95 10935 

no.io 

10935 


.025 

577 

ItOJO 

79.105ep 95 



10520 

+ 025 



753000*5 



109.70 

+ OJO 


9200 

77J5Nov9J 






10610 

*8X0Dec9S 1 03. BO 

10330 

tauo 




92*5 

60-SI Jan 96 






99-50 

6X70 Mar 9« 






I0S65 

91. 10 Apr 0* 






Est. sates 1X000 Tue's. uses 15*39 




1 Tue’s int 6X433 up 193 





SILVER (NCMXl iAattn , » 




5863 

371.0 Jut 94 5373 

5353 

537.0 

5522 



SGXAugW HEL5 

5523 

5S23 



1 



56SX 

5420 




3BDXD+C 94 550.0 

567.0 

5490 










HUB 

4163 Mar +5 56IX 

57S 0 

S61X 




5063 

41 BX May 95 S74X 

S 7/3 

5/40 




61 OX 

420XXI9S 5825 

5*50 

38X5 




Atm 

493X 5ea 95 







539XDec 95 






575X 

5710 Jan 95 






61 EX 

MQ.0Mor96 




*I3J 


ES. sates 45X00 Tue's-sales 17.173 




l Tue's own IrB 146*07 off *19 





PLATINUM (NMER] »lroy«.-dotars«»1rovaL 



<37X0 

357.00X194 40330 

4QELoa 




43500 

348X000 94 406.00 

411X0 

406X0 




42930 

37680 Jon 95 41X00 

41X00 

41030 





39000 Apr 95 41200 






] Est sates 5,742 Tue's-sales 

2.215 





Tue's open Irt 23*03 uc 41 






GOLD 

(NCMXl lHn,u-«Unv, 





417J0 

33960 Junta 3B4J6 

38730 

38630 

3RUD 



38*00 

386X0X194 






415X0 

34150 Aug ta 386*0 

38930 

385*0 




3460003 94 38930 

39240 

38910 

392X0 



47630 

343X0 Dec 94 3»200 

39620 

39X00 

y>sjo 










36650 At* 95 40000 

40250 

400X0 




mjo 

361 JO Jun 95 4DS-20 

40520 

40520 

4&A0 



41133 

38030 AM 91 



40920 

+:*o 


<1130 

470290a 75 



<13X0 




400 50 Dec 95 







41230 Feb <4 



421X0 




APT 96 



425.00 



Esi. safes SSeOOO Tue'i stfes 

14.176 




Tue's open Im 13**22 an 641 






Financial 

US T. BUS «MBtl sinMon-Phdiaim. 

9A7* 952t JlXI 94 9184 9X14 958) 9181 

94.48 «U7SeD94 95L41 9543 9531 95J4 

9*. 10 9425 Dec 94 9*J1 9484 "ATI 9471 

9505 93. 9* Mar 95 «4JS *4*0 9448 «L48 

Ed. sates NA. Tub's, soles 4,262 
Toe's anon mi 3U10 art 94J 

5Y7L TREASURT (CBOT) SIB0JB0riVn-DKI.3anh D ligD K > 
172-05103-075 Jun 94105-315 Kfc-04 105-1* 105-16 - |( 

110- 195102-12 SOP 94 105-00 105-075 10+185 104- ITS— 13 

104- 18 101-28 DecM 103-295- 13 

Esi ides NA Tue's sales *66*3 
Toe's open W 190J 22 oil 177 

18 TIL TREASURY (CBOTI IIODflaaenn-pn AOPasW laapa 

115- 21 102-18 JlXI *4 106-1" 106-28 105-28 105-29 — 22 

11501 1 01 -IB Seo94»05-12 705-23 101-22 704-23 - 22 

114-21 100-25 DecM 104-14 104-30 103-74 103-74 — 33 

111- 07 100-05 Mar ¥51 03- Z3 >03-23 103-31 102-31— 23 

105- 77 92-70 Jun 95 103-00 103-00 107-08 KB-IR— *3 
Est. sates na Tue's. sates 126.785 
Tue's open M 2AX2I7 Off 1730 

115 TREASURY BONDS (CBOT) 

119-29 97-06 Jun 94 103-20 105-28 109-14 104-H — 1 07 JlSfl 

11626 90-12 Sop 94 1M-Z0 104-30 103-15 703-16 —10* rnnin 

IIB-08 91-19 Dec 94 104-06 104-09 lOMfi 102-28 —| nj 

116- 20 99-14 Mar 95103-13 103-18 102-00 103-08 -105 

775-19 98-15 Jun 95 101-71 -UK 

112- 15 99-00 Sap 95 101-OA MK 

113- 14 98-27 Dec 95 100-21 -Jos 

114- 04 28-24 Mar 94 lOKN 

Est. sides NA. Tus’Ajate* 4X<93 
Tue's open int JIU66 is> 556 
MUNICH 1 AL BOWS (CBOTI 11000- noc-irf, A. J2n0i af wa^-T 
104-07 87-06 Jun 94 93-28 ¥*-00 92-28 7MB _ 27 ¥7=1 

95-17 86-13 Sep 94 92-27 92-27 *1-09 71 -H _i „ 


—605 S Ml 
— 0.01 I9JI7 
— (LOT 7J17 
-607 1.6J4 


mju 

I <5-897 

*3 


54512 

96481 

1.346 

63 

ia 


1016 

1.186 

184 

23 

<0 


En. sales NA. Tue's-sales 4453 
Tue'Sapenun 29,922 up 190 
EURODOLLARS (CMER) >1 mODar^ts * :« net 
95-570 90340 See M M.940 94J8S 94570 HSIO 
91180 90719Dec94 *4230 94300 M.t43 W.1S 
95J80 96240 Mw 95 94050 94090 9X910 93930 

94730 9671 □ Jun 95 83.760 91810 83830 916« 

*4520 91 31 D Sm 95 93.00 93JI0 93414 91410 

94280 91. 180 Dec 95 93300 9135B 9bM «XH» 

94.320 90. 750 Mar 96 91360 91300 91130 93.140 

91180 9U30Jun96 93.100 91)80 93J33 KUDO 

Bit. sates NA. Tue’s soles 776.255 
Tue's open HP X413.7D9 oft 273423 
WnSM POUND (CMER) iPKxv+UunlMUH) 

I -5230 1.440) fiePM IJ174 1 52 Ml IJ14B 1-EflO 

IJ180 7 450ODCC94 1J1.TI 1J190 1J170 L51C 

1J770 1-4640 Mar 9* 1JU6 

Est. sales NA Tue's. sides 9.153 
Tue's oeen Int S689? up OB 

CANADIAN DOLLAR (CMER) s >er or- lawlenBoli 10*3*1 
07740 02068 Sep 94 671*3 62200 0.7145 67155 —37 28JH5 

67670 67038 Dec 94 07145 67155 67142 67115 -43 2-11+ 

67605 67D70M3T93 07110 67110 07078 6JB78 —49 . SO 

0-7160 Q 7053 Sep 95 07000 6700S 67000 67004 - '-+41, 31 

Esi. sales NA Tue’s sales 13.103 

Tue's apm int <1074 up 3S7 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) tnr mevk- i MM uOiMfla . 

66101 OJOOOSepM 06070 06114 04045 661)1 *37 6X126, 

66105 0-5590 Dec *4 06085 06116 06085 06113 *37 U72 ' 

' *070 0 5BI0NWVM 66121 *37 658 

Est sates NA Tue's. sates 36-640 
Tue's open ini 136367 up 622 

JAPANE SE T EN (CMER) IMrMn-lmnitstf HfllBl 
OJHO017aa*M2S*pW 600979460D9filOOjn776«JB9eiB *14 54AS0 

OJ)!Oa7flUm9525Dec 94 6OO90696OO98731.OO9BS5OJ3D9875 
OJlfll 25600W80Mar 96 6009949 

Eu. sales ma. Tue’s. sates 2X9*4 
Tue's open tnr 79.926 off 285 
BM1SS FRANC (CMER) inrimc-laHnuheM 
07244 64600 5ep 94 07216 07385 67205 67300 

67257 64885 Dec 94 67258 67316 67268 67310 

Mar 9* 67)29 

Est. sates NA Tue's. sates 19,323 
Tue’s Open Inl SSjBtS up n26 


*13 1.964 
♦ W 363 


‘82 3X557 
*81 at 
*83 1 


industrials 

COTTON* (NCTN) S6A06 lbs.- cent par b. 

8465 5030 Jul 94 79JJD — - 

7650 73-40 Aug 94 7600 

7660 59570094 7675 

77.15 59.48 Dec 94 7S.90 

7600 62-50 Mar 95 7678 

JJ0 64.00 May 95 77 J5 

7670 7050 XI 95 77-46 

7450 71500095 7450 <w< 

Eu.scdes 9.000 Tue^.s«*9S 6J&5 
Tue sopenm SI 544 off 253 
HEATINODIL (NMER) (MOD pal- certs pared 

57.00 41.70 Jul 94 4755 

55-NJ 4X70 Aug 94 4*J5 

57. 17 4350 Sep 94 49 JO 

57 JO 44.9000 94 5620 

SBJ0 46 50 Nov 94 JlJfl 

59.00 4650 Dec 94 5X0$ 

6X25 4125 Jot 95 5X6$ 

5675 47.95 Feb 9S 5225 

gJO <7.XMor9J 51 JO 

5370 5170 Dec 95 SC an — Tr 

EM. soles 5*506 Tue's loMs 25,530 
Tue's Op en Int 126.543 up 720 

M«l*> 14W»«.-d60«PW 
UISXUO 1692 I9.9S 1858 1950 

j-^Aug»4 1625 19.15 1622 1950 

450 Sep 94 17.95 1680 17J0 1667 

17.77 1647 I7J3 16« 

RffiNiwM I7A1 1635 17^1 1852 

>493 Dec 94 17 JB 1632 17JS6 1625 

IHSjPPg 17J0 1123 T7JS5 1612 

17-S 1620 17J5 1610 

17-53 1620 77.0 1619 

17A1 1630 17A1 1620 

J»«o*ti I7A1 1630 7751 1615 

,7 - 40 '8JS 17-SO 1614 
17.70 17.95 17 JO 17 JS 

'7-74 HI* 17.74 161* 

^252*5 17J8 18J0 17.7* 1620 

wxs ,8 ^ v* iaa« 

W’JSNWW 1766 1638 17B6 16a 

£5 S'®!? ,7W lajD 17.90 7602 

>639 1640 1629 1640 

' 1SM50 IWs. sates 141,182 
2JW <26520 up 7B22 

«U? J| *S 51 ■* “J* 51 JO 5185 

S2JB5 5430 51.9* 5430 

51 AO 54O0 51 JO 53.90 

Q. ID 0094 SO JO 52.75 JO SJO 

S-ISU*'? 4> - ls *-35 5145 

a»D«M 5180 5425 5X70 SLM 
5650 Jan 95 Ota Ota nw, c slu 
- 51.I0F0B95 SMS nis aS BIS 

EsL sales 30,937 Tue'i sales 21AS 
Tue'sopenlm UMI up 1232 


nrh. 



7900 

79.93 

*0.14 9 *69 

77X0 

79.13 

+0X8 3 V 

7475 

77X1 

+ 037 6261 

75.90 

7*23 

+031 29JM0 

7628 

7738 

♦0*3 3X00 

7725 

7735 

♦0*5 1X38 :. 

77*4 

7828 

♦ 083 5»--l 

7«0 

7424 

+039 722 

certs aerort 


4725 

50.40 

+2*7 34*86 

4820 

5080 

♦X« 19.464 

49.M 

5130 

♦ 222 13X4) ... 

5B.1S 

52*0 

+ X37 9J7B 

51.15 

5170 

+X57 4.933 ’ 

torn 

54-45 

+2*715.139, 

5255 

55. U 

+ 2*7 9X33 •• 

8X75 

S&JO 

♦2*7 4X11 . ■ 

5128 

5180 

+ 117 XK0 ' 

5530 

DO 

5550 

•0.92 I 




1940 


5400 

5675 

«JS 

5400 

5110 

S31Q 


*685 64170 
*676 83472 
*673 51,132 
>669 26090 . 
* 650 74JI35 
+667 32431 
+ 0-57 15,99* 
+057 10,119 
+047 11468- 
+ 047 45W 
+ 659 9.177 
*0-55 76572 
+633 

-050 X486 
+0-50 6984 
+ 650 1,482 
+ 0 J 0 Ml 
+619 11453 
+631 1X441 


+ 147 37JT1 
+ 1.96 26*85 
*».« 11J43 

•l.« 6 «a 

+ 186 4040 
+ IJ6 X919 
+ 146 1J<T 
+ 14* 79* 


Stock Indexes 


KF'ME' swvnaa 

S^S 4UJD 4SSJH 4*050 -3JH81JM 

a ® sj0 436J55«SpM 4*400 46440 4*090 MtM 

“ -3“ 

ixZfzzr.i?. 251 -Mi uo sm 

SS(jn ZS430 244* -Jm }*£ 

£si. salef NA Tue’s, tales JJ5» 

A-e's open W 4.712 oH 11 


-1-40 

-1.40 


7* 


Commodity Indexes 

ijSST 

S555™ 2 S 

Com. Research 23629 


Prevtous 

UOiJM 

103040 

14X93 

235.71 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


Page 11 



Cie. de Suez’s Sale 
Of Abeille Raises 
Strategy Questions 


Quo ft 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapmdm 

PARIS — Compagnie de Suez 
SA on Wednesday completed the 
sale of the Iasi of its Victoire insur- 
ance units, but investors continued 
to raise questions about the French 
bolding company's strategy. 

France’s largest reinsurer, Scor 
SA, bought the country's fourth- 
largesi reinsurer, Abeille Assur- 
ance, while also boosting its own 
capital. Scor paid Suez 1.3 billion 
French francs (5228 million) and 
19 percent of its equity for Abeille. 

Abeille is one of the units that 
Suez retained after it sold Corapag- 
nie Financfere du Groupe Victoire 
to Commercial Union PLC last 
week. 

The Scot chairman. Patrick Peu- 
geot, said his company could both 
boost its capital and strengthen its 
position on the French market. 

Scot will pay most of the 1.3 
bxUion francs from funds raised in 
a recent sale of convertible bonds. 
As for the equity stake, it will issue 
new shares reserved for Suez “to 
enable Suez to get close to the 20 
percent crucial for consolidation." 
Mr. Peugeot said. 

Taking a stake in Scor isn’t ex- 
pected to be a long-term commit- 
ment for Suez, given that it's al- 
ready divested its Groupe Victoire 
assets," said a trader at Credit 
Suisse First Boston. 

Mr. Peugeot said French reinsur- 
ers are chronically underrepresent- 
ed in their domestic market. They 
have between 35 percent and 38 
percent of the French market, com- 


pared with the United States, 
where domestic reinsurers have up 
to &S percent of the market. 

The acquisition of Abeille Re 
mil bring Scor's share or the. 
French market to about 17 percent, 
from the current 15 percent. ' 

Announcing the sale of Victoire 
last week, the Suez chairman. Ge- 
rard Worms, said he was temporar- 
ily hanging onto Abeille. 

Michael HutUrer, an insurance 
industry analyst at Barclays de 
Zoete Wedd in London, noted un- 
certainty about whether the sum of 
10 billion francs cited as a net gain 
last week by Mr. Worms included 
the sale of Abdfle. A Suez spokes- 
woman said the question should be 
clarified at a Suez shareholder 
meeting. 

Suez will not see a significant 
recovery in earning* until 1995. 
with this year simply marking a 
further step in the company's reba- 
biliiation after the worst results in 
its 135-year history in 1991 Mr. 
Worms said. 

Suez had a loss of 1.87 billion 
francs in 1991 its first loss ever. It 
had a net profit of 1.58 billion 
francs in 1993. 

Mr. Worms declined to comment 
on forecasts that Suez has an annu- 
al earnings potential of 4 billion 
francs a year. 

“People are wondering if Suez is 
gong to be an active shareholder or 
just a sleepy investor," said Jac- 
ques- Franck Dossin at CS First 
Boston in London. “They're sitting 
on lots Of cash." ( Bloomberg. AFX) 


By Erik Ipsen 

Iruemaiiarmt Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The Bank of England has hit 
a dead end in its attempts to gain more inde- 
pendence. and that state of affairs is likely to 
continue for the next Tew years, the bank's 
governor. Eddie George, said Wednesday. 

Mr. George ruled out any chance of the 
central bank gaining the kind of independent 
status now held by its Continental counter- 
parts "in the lifetime of the present govern- 
ment" — which could wait as long as 1997 
before calling elections. 

He also poured cold water on the notion 
that a recent decision to publish minutes of the 
monetary policy meetings be holds with the 


chancellor of the Exchequer gave the bank 
effective veto power over the government's 
decisions on interest tares. 

“You shouldn't overdo this "publications 
of the minutes’ thing," Mr. George told for- 
eign journalists at a news conference. "It is 
dol inconceivable that he could override my 
advice if be felt it were technically flawed/’ 
On European monetary union. Mr. George 
insisted that it was some time off. He said 
that until the problem erf structural unem- 
ployment had been tackled in a number of 
European countries, it would be wrong to 
move to a single currency. 

“Pan of the answer to structural unemploy- 
ment is exchange- rale adjustment," be said. 


As a bank regulator in one erf the world's 
largest derivatives markets, Mr. George said 
that the risks to the financial system fresn 
those products had been exaggerated. 

“People get terrified by the'fiuge numbers 
involved, buv that is not a measure of the 
risk," he said. “The actual risk is quite small" 
He estimated that the risk was only 5 percent 
of the multibOUon-dollar market's size. 

Mr. George also rejected calls for tough 
new regulations on derivatives. The Bank of 
England's approach, he said, was not to ex- 
amine the banks’ exposures but to make sure 
that their models and systems for assessing 
such risks were up to snuff. 


Court Rescues PVC Makers Again 


BRUSSELS — A sl>p of the pen 
cost the European Commission its 
five-and-a-haLf-year batik to fine 
14 companies alleged to have been 
operating a plastics cartel, accord- 
ing to a ruling Wednesday by the 
European Court of Justice. 

But the commission immediately 
struck back by saying it would pro- 
pose the fines, which totaled $27.5 
million, once more and begin the 
process all over again. 

The fines involved an alleged 
cartel operated by the companies in 
the PVC. or polyvinylchloride, sec- 
tor of the chemical industry. 

The European court, based in 
Luxembourg, ruled that Jacques 
Delors, president of the commis- 
sion, had signed the original deci- 
sion in only three of the five official 
languages, an oversight that it said 
invalidated the entire process. 

The court also decided that t here 


were important differences be- 
tween the German-language and 
the English and French texts of the 
commission's decision and that 
changes had been made by people 
wbo lacked authority to make 
them. 

“Acts tainted by an irregularity 
whose gravity is so obvious that it 
cannot be tolerated by ihe Commu- 
nity legal order must be treated as 
having no legal effect," the court 
said in its judgment. 

The court also said it was order- 
ing the commission to to pay its 
legal costs and those of the 14 com- 
panies. 

Among the companies that were 
granted a reprieve were Sdvay SA 
of Belgium, which had been fined 
54.1 million, Elf-Aquitaine of 
France, fined $3.75 million. Impe- 
rial Chemical Industries PLC of 
Britain, fined $19 million, and 


BASF AG and Hoechst AG of 
Germany, each fined $1,750,000. 

It was the court's final ruling in a 
legal process that began soon after 

the fines were first imposed in late 
1988. They were declared void in 
1992, but the commission appealed 
that ruling. 

Although Mr. Delors signed 
French. German and English ver- 
sions of the decision, the docu- 
ments were then given to another 
official to sign the Dutch and Ital- 
ian versions. 

This, the court ruled, rendered 
the decision invalid because the pa- 
pers could be signed only by the 
commission's president and its ex- 
ecutive secretary. 


To subscribe m Germany 

just call, loll free, 

0130 84 85 85 


Airlines Cautiously Look for Profit in V4 Wella to Buy Perfume Maker 


GENEVA — The world’s major international 
airlines could be heading for their first profitable 
year in five years, an official of the International 
Air Transport Association said Wednesday. 

Tom Murphy, IATA’s senior director for finan- 
cial services, said improvements in traffic and re- 
duced capacity growth in 1994 suggested a profit on 
international services for the year of $1 billion, 
though be indicated the projection was tentative. 

The signs are very encouraging." Mr. Murphy 
said, “but a sb’ghl change in the good figures now 
coating in cotda alter the situation." He said traffic 
had grown 8 patent in the first four months of 1 994. 
while seal aradabdiiy bad risen only 5 percent. 

“If these two stay at there levels, then maybe — 


and it’s only maybe — we'll sec a net profit of SI 
billion at the end of the year." he said. 

Last year, the association's 224 member airlines 
had a combined loss of $4.1 billion on internation- 
al services. Over the past four years, the carriers' 
losses have totaled S15.6 billion. 

“We are hopeful that if traffic growth continues 
as the world emerges from recession and we have 
capacity under control, which should produce an 
increase in yields, and if the airlines can continue 
to reduce costs, then maybe we will be in profit for 
the first time in five years," Mr. Murphy said. 

The association's director-general, Pierre Jean- 
niot, said that a retom to profit on international 
services was “the overwhelming Issue" for the 
world's airlines. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Pupatdta 

DARMSTADT, Germany — Wella AG said Wednesday it would 
acquire most of privately owned Mulhens KG, giving the German hair-care 
company an enhanced presence in the. perfumes and cosmetics market. 

Wella refused to say how much it was paying for its slake of “more than 
90 percent" in Mulhens. which had 1993 sales or more than 500 million 
Deutsche marks (5304 million) and has about 1,700 employees. The 
takeover, which will more than triple Wella 's sales in the perfume sector, 
includes brands such as 471 1, Sabatini and Tosca and worldwide licens- 
ing rights for Gucci perfumes. 

At WeDa's annual meeting, its chairman. Peter Ziihlsdorff, said .sales in 
the first five months of the year rose 12 percent. He forecast sales in 1994 
would rise about 15 percent from 2.9 billion DM in 1993. He also said 
profit would show stronger growth than sales. Wella's net profit last year 
was 106.1 million DM. The full-year forecast look into account the 
consolidation of hair-care brands acquired from SmithKline Beecham 
AG - (AFX, Bloomberg) 


IFrankfut* =OV ! V\JLoodtm :*? ; 

.'BAX . •• : ■ ^ / CA£T4<^ •' 


wi: - 


British Gas 
Slumps on 
Pricing Cap 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Shares of British 
Gas PLC fell almost 6 percent 
Wednesday after the UJC gas in- 
dustry's regulator unveiled a for- 
mula to limit price increases at the 
company’s transportation and stor- 
age uniL 

Clare Spottiswoode, director 
general of the Office of Gas Sup- 
ply, said increases should be limit- 
ed to the inflation rate minus five 
percentage points. 

The chief executive of British 
Gas, Cedric Brown, called the deci- 
sion “very tough." 

Taken together with regulatory 
pressures on its gas business as a 
whole, it wilj be difficult for the 
company to justify any increase in 
dividends for 1994," he said. 

British Gas shares fell 17 to 272 
pence ($4. 13) on the London Stock 
Excbange. 

Mr. Brown said the formula 
would lead to a “substantial" re- 
duction in a planned investment of 
£900 milli on annually over three 
years in TransCo, the company 
formed to take control of British 
Gas’s transportation and storage 
assets. 

The price formula will run until 
March 31. 1997, with a starting 
base of 14.16 pence per therm. 

Ms. Spottiswoode said the for- 
mula was based on a rate of return 
of 4 percent to 4.5 percent on exist- 
ing assets, 

( Bloomberg, AFX, Knight-Ridder) 


Bnissefes. 

Frankfort ■' '= DAX' ' - *'■ ■ ■; tfnfch.'. \ ‘ 

FrauAfaii; ■ :r'V.. ' : ; • &&&■■ y78%fi8; . 


: LoddjMi- . := : FfSE 100. ■ • ^ • 3ft4S80 3.Q39&) yyftgQ ' 


Paris' , i ■ V > CAC 40 . 1 t je7&$T. '*0.66 

StoddwfayV •• yifeB/mmpffen-' j 
•tfteilioa 1 ! 'inctex ' 
j&irlch , ■„ • ; ; 198% j- ■ . , ■ J • • : ", gS&Sfe; , ;; BBfi.flg ' , v ^9g- 

Sources: Rmrters. AFP Imemaiioiial fenU Trihraic 


Very briefly; 

• Germany took steps to arm itself against insider trading when the 
Parliament's finance committee approved a bill requiring companies to 
disclose all information that might affect prices of their stocks and bonds. 
The bOl would also establish a watchdog body for the securities industry 
and would make insider trading punishable by up to five years in prison. 

• Banque Natiooale de Paris said its New York-based money manage- 
ment firm, a 50-50 joint venture with NeubergerA Berman, would be able 
to offer global asset management to both U.S. and non-LLS. investors. It 
said this followed the Federal Reserve’s approval of the venture. 
BNP/Ncuberger & Berman, last month. 

• Thames Water PLC London's water utility, said its pretax profit in the 
year ended March 31 dropped 4 percent, to £242 million (S367 million! 
and said results had been burdened by costs of revamping its internation- 
al operations. 

• London Electricity PLC said its pretax profit for the year ended March 
31 rose 28 percent, to £186.5 million, and the company, cited strong 
results in its airport business. 

• Glaxo HoMmgs PLC said Sir Paul Girolaml its chairman, would retire 
from his post Nov. 18 but did not say when a successor would be named. 

• Vseobecna Uverova Banka, the largest Slovak commercial bank, will 
double its equity from the current figure of 104 billion Slovak koruny 
($62 millionl, the Prague daily Hospodarske Noviny reported. 

• Spain’s industrial price index rose 0.1 percent in April from March and 
rose 4.1 percent on an annual basis. In March it posted a monthly rise of 
02 percent and an annual rise also at 4.1 percent. 

• The European Union and Russia will sign agreements to facilitate trade 
in uranium and steel at the EU summit in Corfu, Greece, next week r 1 1 
officials said. 

• Volvo AB said it had acquired more than 99 percent of the shares of its# 
food unit Branded Consumer Products AB. the former food operations of- 
Proconfia AB, through an ofrer for outstanding shares that officially, 
npted Friday. 


NASDAQ 

. . .: WMhMtday’«4p4n. .. . .... i 

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most-timed securities In terms of dollar value. It ta 


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: —sales In lull „ - • 


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INTERNATION AL HER ALD TRIB UNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


South Korea Says 
It Will Ease Laws 
On Car Imports 


Hyundai: Out of the Box 

Container- Making Unit Plans to Diversify 


Ageuee France Pratt 

SEOUL — South Korea prom-' 
feed Wednesday to allow more for- 
eign access to its auto market but 
stayed noncommittal oa a U.S. re- 
quest to lower tariffs, offic i al s said. 

But the South Korean pledge 
was too vague to satisfy American 
auto-industry executives, who are 
in Seoul for a campaign to open the 
auto market 

“As many as 50,000 foreign cars 
could have been sold a year cm this 
market if foreign firms were given 
easier access," Andrew Card, head 
of the American Automobile Man- 
ufacturers Association, said after 
talks with South Korea's trade min- 
ister, Kira Chul Su. 

Mr. Kim promised to ease regu- 
lations to accelerate car imports 
but remained nonco mmittal on Mr. 
Card's proposal that South Korea 
rat tariffs, which now ran up to H) 
percent, Mr. Kim's office said. 

Mr. Card said that South Korea 
imported only 1300 U 3. -made 
cars last year, compared with 
110,000 Korean cars sold in the 
U3. market last year. 

The U3. aolo representative also 
asked Mr. Kim to simplify red tape 
on local sales of foreign cars and to 
end tax audits of foreign car buyers 
here, Mr. Kim’s office said. A state- 
ment issued by Mr. Kim’s office 
said no more tax audits would be 
conducted on foreign car purchas- 
ers. . 

Details were not disclosed, but 
South Korea has indicated that reg- 
ulations on procurement taxes, tele- 
vision commercials and showrooms 
for foreign cars would be eased. 

Mr. Card and other association 
delegates arrived Tuesday in Seoul 


for a five-day visit including talks 
with President Kim Young Sam. 

South Korea imported 4,400 cars 
m 1992 and only 1,900 last year. 

■ Bond Markets Crack Open 

With a potential military crisis 
looming on the Korean peninsula, 
this would not seem to be the ideal 
time to sell foreign investors on 
South Korean debt 

Even so. South Korea is plan- 
ning to open its bond market next 
month, Bloomberg Business News 
reported. 

On July l, foreign investors will 
be allowed to buy convertible 
bonds — bonds that can be con- 
verted to stock — issued by small 
South Korean companies, and for- 
eign securities companies will be 
able to underwrite government 
bonds. 

In 1995, foreigners will be invit- 
ed to invest in Sooth Korean bonds 
through special mutual funds, 
while international organizations 
will be permitted to issue won-de- 
nominated bonds. 

But a genuine opening of the 
bond market win not take place 
until after 1997, when foreigners 
will be allowed to buy nooguaran- 
teed, long-term corporate bonds is- 
sued by small companies. 

Despite the easier access, the un- 
certainty over the nuclear arms sit- 
uation m North Korea probably 
will keep foreign investors away for 
now, brokers said. 

The heightened tensions already 
are having an impact on South Ko- 
rea’s bond and slock markets. 

South Korean-issued bond 
yields, which move in the opposite 
direction of bond prices, soared re-' 
centiy as the marcel value of the 
bands fell 


Realm 

ULSAN, South Korea — The world’s largest 
producer of containers, Hyundai Precision & In- 
dustry Co, is planning diversification in die face of 
a global slump in demand. 

Hyundai Precision, a subsidiary of Hyundai 
Group, wants to change its image of making ship- 
ping containers and boost its high-tech sectors — 
aerospace, military hardware and vehicles. 

“we will make every effort to become the lead- 
ing integrated machinery manufacturer at home 
and abroad.’* said Song Byung Yul. executive rice 
president 

Established in 1977, Hyundai Precision ac- 
counts for 30 percent of the world's container 
market but is increasingly being challenged in the 
field of low-value, labor-intensive steel dry-cargo 
containers. 

“We have been losing global price competitive- 
ness since 1987 because of wage hikes and high 
inflation, but we will tiy hard to keep our reputa- 
tion as the largest container maker " Mr. Song 
said. 

The company has already gone upward in the 
market, raising its production of stainless-steel 
refrigeration containers, which increasingly are 
preferred for environmental reasons. Its goal is to 
make 12,000 this year. 

Labor costs are pushing production overseas, 
and the company established Hyundai de Mexico 
SA in 1989 to make steel and aluminum dry-cargo 


containers. It also extended manufacturing to 
Thailand, Indonesia and China. 


Rising Role 
Is Seen lor 
Mideast Oil 


A sharp reduction in demand and a strike hurt 
tsiness fast year. Hyundai Precision pasted a loss 


business fast year. Hyundai Precision posted a loss 
of 48.9 billion won ($60 millka) on sales of 1.35 
trillion woo in 1993, after a 5.6 billion won profit 
on sales of 1-27 trillion won the year before. 

Containers accounted for 18 percent of sales last 
year, down from 34 percent in 1992. Vehicles now 
represent the largest portion of sales, 31 percent 
Last year, compared with 22 percent in 1991 

Starting with car parts, including transmissions 
and axles, Hyundai Precision developed the Gal- 
loper in 1990 in a link with Mitsubishi Motors. 
Galloper accounts Tor more than half of domestic 
four-wheel-drive demand. 

Die company received a boost last year when 
the Anglo-French consortium GEC Alsthom chose 
the company as a leading contractor for South 
Korea's first high-speed train project. 

Aerospace is among its brightest prospects. The 
company makes helicopters and aircraft parts and 
hopes to build commuter planes. Hyundai-Yak 
Aerospace Co. was set up this year with Yak 
Aircraft Corp. of Russia to develop and make 30- 
seaier and 1 50-sea ter aircraft starting in 1996. 

Analysts said Hyundai Precision would make a 
profit ibis year. ‘The company bas been showing 
improvement, especially in management and by 
cutting heavy financing costs," said David Kim of 
Schroder: Securities. 


China’s Inflation Rate Fell in May 


Bloomberg Bittiness News 

BEUING — China’s inflation 
rate dropped in May for the second 
consecutive month, the State Sta- 
tistics Bureau reported Wednes- 
day, but other data suggested that 
the economy was continuing to 
hem up, and (he bureau cautioned 
against any letup in the battle 
against rising prices. 

Retail prices in May were 18.9 
percent higher than in the same 


month of 1993. with the year -on- 
year increase down from 19.5 per- 
cent in April and 20J percent in 
March, according to the report, 
carried by tbe official Xinhua press 
agency. 

“It’s still very important to bring 
soaring prices under control” the 
agency quoted a bureau economist 
as saying. 

Industrial output was up 17.3 
percent in May, compared with 16 


percent in the first quarter, the bu- 
reau reported. Retail sales from 
January to May were up 4.5 per- 
cent, after adjusting for inflation, 
from the like period in 1993. From 
January through April, retail sales 
were up 43 percent from a year 
earlier, after inflation. 

The number of private compa- 
nies rose 33,500 to 271.400 in the 
first quarter, the Administration of 
Industry and Commerce reported. 


oil-supply crises, particularly as 
their snare of world oil consump- 


their share of world oil consump- 
tion declined and refineries re- 
duced oti slocks, Mr. Feniter said. 

He added that most Asian coun- 
tries did not have an energy securi- 
ty system, although the Association 
of Southeast Asian Nations has an 
oil-sharing arrangement on paper. 
ASEAN groups the net oil export- 
ers Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia 
with the Philippines, Singapore and 
Thailand, which are net importers. 

(Reuters. AFP, AFX) 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Bank Makes Bid for Foodland 


NBJUIY - SAINT-JAMB. Top tfcor. 
««y oast swnwndBd Mlfi freo. TOP 
OUaQtY 250 sqm APARTMENT. 


MANY CONGRATULATIONS 

on raodwg tf« big RYE 25Q. 


Bobnes 4- 200 sqm. terra* with 
3£fl° VIEW. 3 bethoorn, 2 boiVrocfot, 


May there bo mny more to come. 
fltn best wishes horn ai yacr Mm 
d the hton UMri Herald Tribune 


2 parinngL 2 ceflon Unique desga 
Tetri) <637 28 27 or |J|462<6127 




l aid 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CHMMMG 2 bed farahed Bor to 
rent in feofy Setae Pert Fieodi 
wndms. pono. 20 men. to West End. 
Avetth from end June to December. 
£220 per week. Tat <4 71 483 2817 


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TODAYS 


INTERNATIONAL 

RECRUITMENT 

Appears on Page 4 


Bloomberg Businas News 

AUCKLAND. New Zealand — Rank Commercial Ltd. cm Wednesday 
announced a takeover offer for Foodland Associated Ltd, a grocery 
wholesale and retail group operating is New Zealand and Australia. 

Rank, owned by New Zealander Graeme Hart, said it planned to split 
Foodland’s Australian and New Zealand operations and sell the Austra- 
lian assets to Coles Myer Ltd, Australia's largest retailer. 

The bid, at 537 Australian dollars (USS3.85) a share, values Foodland 
at more than S365 million. The offer price is 52 cents a share above 
Foodland's closing price Wednesday on the Australian stock exchange. 
The announcement was made after the market closed 


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Rank said the bid was conditional on acquiring 75 percent of Food- 
land. It already controls 14.9 percent. 

Australia's Trade Practices Commission said it would examine the bid 
paying particular attention to the role of Coles Myer. 

“Given Coles's large involvement" in supermarkets, we are required to 
have a further look at it and see if there is the risk of a substantial lessening 
of competition,’' the commissi on said. The process could take weeks. 

Foodland owns Fanners Deka, a New Zealand discount and depart- 
ment store, and holds 57.4 percent of the grocery group Progressive 
Enterprises in New Zealand. 


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International Conferences and Seminars 

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Education Directory 

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Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

International Recruitment 

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Real Estate Marketplace, Hobdays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts arid Antiques 



Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 




«.£Vv 


Compiled by Our SusjJ From Dispatches 

SINGAPORE — The Interna- 
tional Energy Agency said 
Wednesday that Asa's dependence 
on imported oil would rise to about 
65 percent in 2010 from about 35 
percent currently. 

“TEA countries and other con- 



1225-'. 


EV.9BBP0r.-j 








',1994 , 

s&jyProv; . “ 


aiming areas, notably Aria. wQl 
become incrcasinely dependent on 


become increasingly dependent on 
imports of oil from tbe Middle 
East,” John Ferriter, tbe agency’s 
deputy executive director, said at a 
conference. 

“Import dependence per se is not 
the true measure of concern,** be 
said. “Rather it is the vulnerability 
to economic dislocation in the 
event of supply disruption.” 

Mr. Ferriter said that agency 
member countries had agreed (o 
bold oil stocks equal to at least 90 
days' net imports to enhance ener- 
gy security, and that nonmember 
countries whose demand for oil is 
growing might not be equipped to 
deal with a supply disruption. 

Tbe agency comprises tbe 25 
members of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment, with the exception of 
Mexico and Icdand. 

Supply disruptions could place 
an extra burden on countries that 
do belong to the agency in times of 




mm 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


.frttLIB ~ +0*g ' 

-0, 05 
.-0.33 
+1.53' ' 

&&7E -t aC 

^ -f&BM ’ A).4& 

’. ‘.+Lf7 

i;gyw" +6-tp. 

InmtuiiKKaL HniU T ribunc 


Very briefly: 


• international Business Machines Corp. will set up a headquarters Tor 
Southeast Asian computer operations in Australia. 

• Mats u s h i ta Electric Industrial Co. expects worldwide shipments of air- 
conditioning equipment to expand to 21 million units in the five years io 
M arch 1999, from 15.7 million in the five years to March 1994. 

• Creative Technology Ltd. shares made a strong debut on the Singapore 
Stock Exchange, rising as much as 16 percent from their offering price. 

• Tokyo department-store sales fell 6.8 percent in May from a year earlier 
to 188 Wlion yen (52 billiofl). 

• China Pharmaceutical Enterprise & Investment Corp. was oversub- 
scribed more than three times at its public offering in Hong Kong. 

• All Nlppoa Airways Co. applied for twice-weekly flights between Osaka 
and Tsingtao, China, starting in September. 

• Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. unit NTT Data Communications 
Systems won an order jointly with Hitachi Lid. and Sumitomo Corp. to 
install a computer system for China's postal savings system. 

Reuters, Bloomberg. AFX. A P. AFP. Knight RidJcr 


Congratulations to 

International Food Works Incorporated 

for conducting the negotiations and special congratulations to 

Britannia Pharmaceuticals Limited 

for acquiring Ihe U.K. rights to 

Parkinson's Trust 

Lo Pro Lunch 

❖ 


Parkinson's Charitable Trust 

37B Roncesvalles Avenue, Toronto. Canada M6R 2M.' 
Tel: (416) 537-4305 Fax: (416) 537-5806 


SCI TECH 

8, avenue Marie-Therese 
L-2132 LUXEMBOURG 

B-C. I^nnskmg B 2UOS8 


We have the pleasure of inviting the idiarcholcler* lo ntlrrxl (hr 
Annual General Meeting of the Shareholders, lo he held a ilie 
hereabove registered office of the Company, on June 24. 199) ,n 
3.00 p.m. 

AGENDAS 

1. Submission of tbe- reports of (be Board or Directors 
aad of the Aadkor; 

2. Approval of (Ire Statement of Assets and liabilities 
»g at IMarrfa 31, 1994 and of (be .Statement of 
Operations for the year ended Jllareh 31, 1994; 

3. Allocation of tbe net resalts; 

4. Discharge to the Directors; 

5. Election or reelection of Directors and of the 
Auditor; 

6. Mlscetlaneoas. 

The shareholders are advised that no quorum for tin- ili-ni» of die 
agenda is required, and that the derisions hill lie taken al a simple 
majority of the shares present or represented al the meeting. A 
shareholder may art by proxy. 


TBE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


KXl SCHEDUUS doty Rohtv la. busnra. 
• Barony or bwesi fo-e, ofco D-day 
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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY, JUNE 16. 1994- 




ers 



By Joe Lapointe 

Yc-w Ytirk Times Sen ice 

NEW YORK — They hoisted 
high the big silver trophy, passed it 
around, shook it over their heads. 
Sometimes they kissed it. Slowiy. 
they skated a ceremonial victory 
iap before a capacity crowd of 
18,200 and an international televi- 
sion audience. 

Led by Mark Messier, the New 
York Rangers had won the Stanley 
Cup for the first time since 19413. 
gaining the National Hockey 
League's championship chalice by 
beating the Vancouver Canucks. 3- 
2, in Madison Square Garden. 

As of Wednesday morning, the 
words curse, jinx and hex for North 
American sports teams belonged 

solely to the Chicago Cubs and the 

Boston Red Sox. 

The conclusion of this decisive 
Game 7 in this best-of-seven-game 
series was incredibly tense, with the 

Canucks dominating play in die 
Rangers' zone for the final five 
minutes, and still having a chance 
to lie it with the final face-off in the 
circle to the right of goalie Mike 
Richter with jusi over a second to 
ga Their goalie was on the bench, 
replaced by an extra attacker. 

Then it ended, fireworks explod- 
ed in the building while Mike 
Keenan and Messier, the coach and 
the captain, embraced. A fan held 
up a sign that said “Now. I Can Die 
in Peace.” 

“The challenge of winning here 


? 





e Rangers Win the Cup 


• v.' - 

- - ' - ..3V 

%rV : i. 

S’ 7"> •• . 

r * r-. . 


after 54 years.” Messier said, who 
won five Stanley Cups with the 
Edmonton Oilers and scored the 
goal that won this trophy, “was 
erasing all the ghosts.” 

The winner of the Conn Smythe 
trophy as the most valuable player 
in the playoffs was Brian Leetch. 
the attacking defenseman who 
opened the scoring in Game 7. The 
Ranger's other goal wss scored by 

STANLEY CUP FINAL 

Adam Graves: Trevor Unden. the 
Canucks' captain, scored both uf 
-his team's goals. 

The first period began with a 
slow and tentative pace, with the 
puck often surrounded by several 

bodies along the boards. But mid- 
way through the period, the Rang- 
ers quickly scored twice. 

Without a goal in the previous 
two games. Leetch finished a play 

that he began at ihe other end when 
he passed to Messier. 

He carried the puck down ice 
and past Pavel Bure, the Vancouver 
superstar, along the right wall, then 
made a backhanded puss, against 
the grain, to Sergei Zubov. The 
Rangers’ other auacking defense- 
man held the puck as he closed in 
down the right side while the action 
seemed to shift into slow motion. 

Leetch then sprang into the play, 
down the other side, took Zubov's 
pass and beat lunging goalie Kirk 
McLean on the open side of the net 


as Graves txcupicd a Canuck de- 
fenseman in the slot. 

Then Graves, without a goal for 
ID consecutive playoff games after 
leading the team in goals during the 
regular season with 52. scored on 
the power play. 

Again. Zubov played a major 
role, carrying the puck up ice and 
passing off at the Vancouver blue 
line after drawing two defenders. 
He gave it to Alexei Kovalev, who 
passed the puck from left to right to 
Graves, on the goalie's doorstep. 

The Canucks twice came close to 
scoring on the same shift, late in the 
period. First. Greg Adams beat 
Richter with a shot between the 
pads, but the puck trickled wide of 
the post. Next. Bure circled the net 
and flipped a .shot that entered I he 
crease, trickled through the paint 
inches from the goal line and then 
exiled out the other side. 

In the second period, the Rang- 
ers had several good scoring 
chances in the first five minutes, 
but the Canucks got the goal. 

With the Rangers on a power 
play and the referee. Terry Greg- 
son. about to call a delayed penalty 
on them. McLean left his net for an 
extra attacker because play would 
stop as soon as the Ranger* 
touched the puck. 

They never did. The extra at- 
tacker was Linden, who sailed 
down ice with Leetch in pursuit 
and beat Riehter on a chip shot 
from the forehjnd at 5:21. 


The Rangers went up by 3-1 at 
13:2y on a power-play goal by 
Messier. Although he didn't get an 
assist, the goal again was created by 
Zubov, who moved the puck from 
the blue line to the slot, where 
Messier. Graves and Brian Noonan 
all had chances. 

The Canucks opened the third 
period on the attack, forechecking 
the way they had in their victories 
in Games 5 and 6. trying to batter 
the Rangers' short-handed corps of _ 
defensemen and force them into £ 
turnovers. 

Momentum then swung to the 
Rangers, with Noonan coming close 
at the end of a forceful shift along- 
side Esa Tikkanen and Craig Mac- 
Tavish. But Tikkanen was seen sent 
out again to cover Bure, and was 
sent off for pulling him down. 

On thecn»uing power play. Lin- 
der got his second goal, finishing a 
slick passing combination from the 
side of the net afier the flow of the 
play had pulled Richter to the other 
side. 

Moment* later. Nathan La- 
Fay etio goL by Zubov, and Richter 
had to stop him with a kick save. 
Midway through the period. Jeff 
Brown's shot from center ice hit j 
Kevin Lowe and almost sneaked 
past Richter. With the teams playing 
Tour aside. Lowe hit the goalpost. 

With just under six minutes to. a 
shot by LaFayette got past Richter 
but hit the post. 

It was the Rangers' turn to win. Ada 




fin Fftte’nt 


Adam Graves, getting the puck up dose on Sergei Zubov's second assist put it between Kirk McLean s tegs to give New YorkftTi 

, ** •*% r 


Griffey Hits 2 More Homers. 
2d Beating Rangers in 13th 


The I citiuil Press 

As Ken Griffey Jr. stood in the on- 
deck circle in the 1 Jih inning, the heck- 
lers took their best shot at him. 

In reply, he hit his second home run of 
the game, a two-out shot into the upper 
deck in right field that gave the visiting 
Seattle Mariners a 7-6 victory over the 
Texas Rangers on Tuesday night. 

“One guy was on me about how much 
money I made. ' Griffey said. “I told htm 
if he had a problem with money, he 

AL ROUNDUP 

should get a better job. Another guy had 
•stoned harrassing me in center field and 
moved all the w ty to behind the dugout." 

Griffey, who leads the majors with 2$ 
homer, went 4-tor-7 a day after hilling a 
grand slam and driving in a career-high 
six runs in Texas. 

At his current pace, he would hit 73 
home runs this season. “I’ve got to hit 
30. then 40. then 50 before 1 start think- 
ing about beating any records." he said. 

He had led off the seventh with a 
homer to right for a 64 lead, but the 
Rangers tied with two runs in the ninth. 

Yankees 4, Orioles 3: Lee Smith blew 
a save chance for only the third lime in 
27 chances when visiting New York ral- 
lied for two runs in the ninth to beat 
second-place Baltimore. 

Smith relieved with a 3-2 lead, but 
Daryl Boston led off with a pinch-hit 
single, and Pal Kelly sacrificed. Luis 
Polooia chopped a single off the plate 
that Smith threw wildly for an error, 
enabling Boston to score. Wade Boggs 
followed with a go-ahead single. 

Steve Howe got two outs, stranding 


runners at first and third, for hi* fifth 
save, while Mike Devercaux hnmercJ 
and drove in two runs for Baltimore. 

Indians 7. Blue Jays 5: Cleveland beat 
Toronto and won its 13th straight at 
home when Albert Belle and Eddie Mur- 
ray homered on consecutive pilches io 
stan the eighth. Belle and Murray each 
drove in three runs against Juan Guz- 
man. while Devon White homered and 
drove in three run* for Toronto. 

Twins 5. Red Sox 4: Mo Vaughn's 
error at first base set up a sacrifice fly by 
Dave Winfield that scored the winning 
run as Minnesota took advantage of three 
errors to win its sixth in a row and hand 
Boston its eighth straight loss at home. 

Tigers 10. Brewers 8: Travis Fryman'* 
three-run double in the 13th gave De- 
troit its victory in Milwaukee. 

Fix-man went 4-for-6. drove in four 
runs and extended his hitting streak to a 
career-high 15 games. Junior Felix, who 
then hit an RBI single, also homered in 
the first, giving the Tigers homers in 20 
straight games. The major league record 
is 25 game*, by the 194 1 Yankees. 

Angel* l. Royal* 0: Spike Owen 
walked in the sixth, stole second, contin- 
ued to third on Mike Maefjrlane's 
throwing error and then scored with two 
outs on Greg Gagne's error at shortstop 
as California won in Kansas City. 

Chuck Finley pitched his second shut- 
out of the season: the Royals' Mark 
Gubicza struck out eight in 7 % innings. 

Athletics 5. WMte Sox 2: Steve Onti- 
veros shut out host Chicago on one hit 
for seven innings, and Dennis Eckersley 
escaped a ninth-inning jam for Oakland. 
Rickey Henderson had three hits and 
scored two runs for the Athletics. 


For the Elders 


Tin- I 

Kent Mercfcer was practically unhitta- 
ble. Fedro A Mario pitched another com- 
plete game and Dwight Gooden struck 
out 10. for the first tune in two seasons. 
It was not a bad night for the elders. 

But Charlie Hough, the olde*i player 
in the major leasue*. out pitched them 
all. 

The 46-;. ear-old knuckleballer threw 
126 pitches in hot and steamy St. L-mi*. 
then walked away with a five-ltitier and 

NT ROUNDUP ~ 

a season-high nine strikeout.-, as the Flor- 
ida Marlins beat the Cardinals. T -0. 

it was his first complete game in 04 
starts in the National League. 

“I think they should give him a five- 
year comract extension." said the Cardi- 
nals' manager. Joe Torre. "The way he 
pitched, you didn't know how old he v. j> 
tonight." 

Said the Marlins’ manager. Rene La- 
chemann: "He’s two years younger than 
I am and ! had a tough time silting on 
the bench, let alone going out there and 
pitching.” 

Hough struck out the side in the first 
inning, struck out two more in the fifth 
and didn't allow a runner past second 
base. 

“The heal doesn't bother me." he said. 
"The heat was fine. The only thing that 
bothers me is my legs setting sore."but 1 
wasn't tired at aH."~ 

Kurt Abbot! hit a grand slam for the 
Marlins, who broke open the game with 
a five-run seventh. 

Braves 3, Rockies I: Mercker struck 
out nine in Atlanta and allowed Colora- 
do only three hits in seven innings. 

Ryan Klesko hit a solo homer and Bill 


Oiibs’ Pitch Puts Players Near Strike Zone 




By Richard Justice 

II ■ ishsnst.-n F-‘S: Sr.-.m‘ 

NEW YORK — Major league baseball ha* moved 
a step c)o*er to a laie-*eo*on player* sinke with :be 
team*" owner* formally proposing a complex new 
collective bargaining agreement that include? a salary 
cap that would set limits on players earnings and slow 
the increase of salaries. 

Richard Ravitch. chief negotiator for the owners, 
laid out the plan in a relatively brief meeting Tuesday 
with lop officials of the Major League Players Associ- 
ation. It includes significant changes In free user.:;- — 
the opportunity for a player to negotiate with other 
dubs. It also eliminate* salary arbitration — the 
process in which an independent arbitrator choose: 
between conflicting figure* when a player and his 
team cannot agree on a salary. 

In addition, owners want to include the p-j.- e:*' 
lucrative licensing agreement, in the :o:al rev "jr.ue 
pool. Player? are currently paid their licensing tr,-:r.- 
ey. believed to be worth about StO.OOO or more rtf 
player annually, in deals made apart from their regu- 
lar salaries. The union negotiates those deals Jr.e 
druribuies the Funds. 

For free aaency. the threshold would drop from ri\ 
years of major league service to four, but a player's 
old club would be able to match the highest offer 
until he has six year/ service. 

However, union official? emphasized, the rr-rr.ar 
goal of the new agreement was simple. 

The owners, now are spending 5? percent e: their 
revenue- on salaries, would spend 5v percent under 
the new agreement. In comparison. National Foot- 


ball League owners recently agreed to spend 63 
percent of designated revenue* on salaries in their 
new agreement, although that agreement does not 
include revenues from" sources such as the more 
expensive ciub seating in stadiums and local broad- 
casting. National Basketball .Association players re- 
ceive 23 percent of designated revenues, but also have 
a flexible system that" allows teams to exceed the 
salary cap to sign their own free agents. 

“The clubs are never content with the American 
system.” said Eugene Orza. associate legal counsel for 
the union. “What the clubs want is a nice common 
mix of Adam Smith and Joseph Stalin.” 

Donald Fehr. executive director of the Major 
League Players Association, will brief his executive 
beard a*, a meeting Thursday in Chicago. He prom- 
ised tc study the document.' but hi* initial reaction 
■•■•as. a* expected, negative. 

“It's taking money from the player? and giving it to 
±e owners, ""he said. 

Players, fearing the owner* will declare an impasse 
and unda:eru!!y impo-e the new sy:tem during ihe 


bargaining power. It differs in that it includes a hard' ' . 
salary cap. 

Ravitch said a salary cap was necessary becanses© ; -' 
many small-market dubs were losing money and; ■: 
unable to compete in an era when the average playefc j 
salary has gone from S44.676 in 1975 to 51.2 '* 

in 195*4. The dubs will also bepnstSyasno of mwb«s£ X 
sharing that transfers a portion oF the sncome&wn; - 
profitable teams like the Baltimore Oriotesand New> £•' 
York Yankees to struggling teams such asfheSans J. : 
Diego Padres arid Seattle Mariners. . X -: : ^a 

Owners included the hard salary cap inthcagree^ * 
meat because, according to Ravitch, it was the mfi.X 
way the profitable would agree to share tbote? X 
revenues. - (- 

“This plan is a fair and intelligent way to- serveJhc;' £ / 
long-term interests of aO concerned -the clubs, g&t* y. 
players and the fans.” Ravitch said. “Everyone knowN' 1 ' - 
baseball must have economic sanity off the fidd and^ 
competitive balance an the field. Tins proposal pn>^ 
videsboth." ■ A 'J. 

Ravitch showed charts detailing how die avrraee 


Sc Stea? 


strike authorizations from the rank-and-file player? 
ihj? week and may set a strike date at a July i! 
meetup m Pittsburgh. 

Fehr said the player? vii! make a proposal of their 
ov-t. next week. 

In some way?, the proposal t? similar toothers the 
owner? have made over the la*t 21 year? in that it 
eliminate: arm i ration and leaves player? with fewer 
thx - . five year? of major league service with less 


go as high as SL6 million by 2001 if revenue growth 
continues at its current rate of i4 percent. . • j j 

However, the primary goal of die proposal is to put 
some limits on salaries — the vay thing the players- - 
probabk are least likely to negotiate. They woo foe? 
agency in the courts and through collective bargain -r 
ing, and their sources said they simpfy were not going ' 
to give it up, which sets the stage for.ibe game's eighth ^ 
work stoppage in 22 years. - ; '.>7 


Pecota. a late addition io the siarung 
lineup, drove in another run in the sixth 
with an RBI single. 

Dodgers 5. Reds 2: Astaeio scattered 
nine hits in Los Angeles for his third 
complete game of the season and rookie 
Garey Ingram homered and got two 
RBIs against Cincinnati. 

Astado allowed fewer than three 


earned runs for :he seventh time in eight 
outings. 

Phillies 3. Mers 2: In New York. John 
Kruk broke up Gooden's shutout bid 
with a solo homer in the seventh, and 
Doug Smith pitched out of a bases- 
ioaded. one-out situation in the eighth 
for his NL-leading 1 7th save. 

Expos 12. Pirates 7: Larry Walker hit 


a two-run triple against Pittsburgh be- 
fore he and pitcher Pedro Martinez were 
ejected after a fifth-inning brawl in 
Montreal. 

Marquis Grissom was 3-for-3 with 
two walks and four runs and Sean Berry 
had three RBIs as the Expos scored a 
season-high 12 runs. 

Astros 7, Giants 4: Jeff Bagwell drove 


in three runs with two doubles rod #V 
homer, increasing his leagjo-teaffipg 
RBI total to 62, as Houston won inSas 
Francisco. V 

Cubs 7, Padres 6s Tally Rbod&hxta . 
two-run double in the 1 1th as Chicago, ; 
after blowing a five-run lead, won iir&sp 
Diego. Rey Sanchez, who replaced Ry»r 
Sandberg at second base, went 4-fbw. i 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1994 


Page T 


fFor Wegerie, Man of Many Lands, the Moment Is 4 Years Too Late 



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By I 311 Thomsen 

. ; . International Herald Tribune 

CHICAGO Roy Wegerie has passed these 
three^ears looking forward to this one month 
to tins taranament in this prairie of soccer! 
when his faflGance Anally would coalesce on 
He £30 and he isn’t what he should have 
become. He really should have become one of 
the best players u the world. 

The moment of truth. lA/nHHrun 
which always seemed com- , ™ ? UU P 
fortingfy far away, is upon | Is, AQA 
him new like a jet. It arrives LJ O/iiJTr 


warning the prodigy to stand up for himself, to 
not sacrifice his genius to the En glish buQhead- 
edness. Id South Africa, in America, Wegerie 
bad flourished. In England, alone and 22 years 
old. he was told to At in. But it's more revealing 
to let him tell it 

“I would try certain things that nobody else 
would try, and they’d come off and I'd be a 
hero,’* Wegerie said. “Bat if they didn’t come off, 
I wouldn’t play for three more games. I wouldn’t 
be with the team for the next two weeks- 1 1 would 
be a punishment forme; Don’t be too cocky and 


SESSa^iriDMh jjon’t try thatagain because if it doesn’t succeed. 


from the bench. The most Lm- 0 % 

portent soccer game played 

by his adoptive country, and 

he, its most promising talent, >v\w 

will be a substitute. 

Three years ago, the U.S. 

Congress -was preparing to ask President 
George Bush to dispense with naturalization 
procedure and declare Wegerie an American 
citizen. Three years later and circumstance, 
which marks Wegerie out or a lot of games, 
threatens now to tackle him. He is a genius with 
the ball one of its rare masters, but Wegerie 
leaves you with the image of the ball playing 
bim. He has undergone three knee surgeries this 
year; he hasn’t played a full game since Jan. 3. 
when be scored for his English club, Coventry 
City, m the Premier League. 

“I think I can and I want to play,” Wegerie 
said alter meeting with the U.S. coach. Bora 
Mihumovic, who might use him in the second 
half against Switzerland on Saturday. “But 
that’s what Bora’s decided to do.” 

There is still time in the next few weeks to 
force his way in with his battering-ram talent, 
to prove that the English game hasn’t taken the 
best of him. Bnttben he was limiting himself by 
uniting with America in the first place, accord- 
ing to bis patron striker. Rodnev Marsh, who 


then you won’t be playing next week or you 
won’t be playing for the next few weeks' or 
youU be a substitute. So eventually you get 
scared to do it: Tin not going to try that anymore 
because I know what’s going to happen if it 
doesn’t work. That’s how they bring you down 
to their level It’s just through fear, really, and 
they change you. That’s just how it works.” 

The ensuing eight seasons in England have 
been skittish. From four goals in just two sea- 
sons with demoted Chelsea, io 23 goals with 
tiny Luton Town, which needed a star and 


cashed him in in December 1989 for a ciub- 
record £1 million to Queen's Park Rangers — 
Marsh’s old club. Wegerie wore Marsh’s old 
No. 10 and fans paid him the ultimate compli- 
ment: “Go on, Rodney!” Despite a midseason 
knee injury, be was the team’s outs tanding 
player in 1990-*91 with 19 goals, third-best in 
the league, including the gori of the year — an 
Indiana Jones mission criss-crossing half of the 
Add. Even then . . . 

“I was forever getting him into the dressing 
room, telling him to get more aggressive, to get 
into that penalty box and go at them.” said Don 
Howe, the former England manager who 
coached Wegerie at Queen's Park. "What he 
needs is for somebody to put his arm around him 
and tdl him: *Go and do that now, go at that 
man and beat him! Take ail of his t ackles, pick 
yourself up, and go by him!' See, he needs that — 
a lot of praise and personal attention, and just 
that tittle bit of a threat that if he doesn’t do it, 
then he’s coming out of the game. If you leave 
him to himself, I wouldn't say he goes off on his 
own, but I don’t think he’s terrifically self- 
motivated. He’s a very nice boy.” 

Wegerie was eligible four years ago to play 


for West Germany (bis father was bom there), a fulltime "public relations consultant” in Lon- 
for England (as a resident) and, conceivably, for don on behalf of the US. World Cup Organiz- 
the United States, by his marriage. The others ing Committee. Her husband was sworn in as a 
offered the greater challenge, but he had the idea U.S. citizen last July in Chicago, but rather than 
of America as an open canvas. America saw . taking pride in their ingenuity, Rolhenberg and 
him as its first home-run hitter, its Babe Ruth in US. officials initially chose to keep Wegerie’ s 
a sport of 1-0 games. Even bis failures were eligibility secret — partially berause they 
more impressive than most American successes, feared a public backlash against their legal 

A last-minute effort to naturalize him in time maneuvermgs. "As a lawyer, you so me tiroes 
for the 1 990 World Cup. reportedly with the aid Kkc to keep your clever moves between you and 
of Henry Kissinger, ended when the U.S. coach, your own people,” Rolhenberg admitted. 

Bob Gansler, suggested that it would be a good But then Howe was replaced at Queen’s Park 

idea for Wegerie to join his team at the last and Wegerie was sold thereafter to tbe Premier- 
moment. The bureaucratic effort was revived ship contender, Blackburn Rovers, where he 
with tbe August 1990 election of the Los Ange- was understudy to Alan Shearer, the England 
les attorney, Alan Rolhenberg. as president of striker, then moved on to Coventry City last 
the U.S. Soccer Federation. "Most of the peo- year. He has been unable to recreate his form of 
pie I talked to said that, if we had Roy. be four years ago. Yet even the n at the top of bis 
would be tbe best player on our team,” Rothen- game, Wegerie had the sound of defeat in an 
berg said. "When 1 beard that f said. ‘Let’s interview in a Chelsea restaurant following his 
make this a priority.' ” breakthrough 1990-91 season at Queen's Park. 

In June 1991. the USSF discovered a law “Sometimes you have to change in order to 
granting immediate citizenship to Wegerie. tbe succeed,” he said then. "You have to bring 
provision being that his American wife, Marie, yourself down to their level and then once 
find employment overseas with a U.S.-based, you’re down there, you can start bringing your- 
company. Rolhenberg immediately hired her as self back up again. That’sjusl how it works. But 


I’m over that now. That’s all behind me.” 

But his wife knew better. "The fun you used 
to have with it; you were so cocky about it.” she 
said to him, and her eyes fell. "He enjoyed the 
game a lot more then.” 

“That’s when you’re a kid,” be replied. “You 
mature when you grow older, don't you? When 
a person’s SO years old, he still doesn't do the 
things he would do when he was 20. It’s not 
because he’s not as cocky. He's because he’s 
grown op." 

“Yes. but if you've lost the enjoyment of it,” 
she began. Then she said, finally, "I think 
they've kicked a lot of it out Of you over here.” 

Roy Wegerie is tbe type upon which this new 
soccer country is dependent Most of those 
playing for the U.S. team lack weekly interna- 
tional experience, while those who' have re- 
turned from overseas dubs are by no means 
stars. Each is limited in some way. But there 
remains in someone like Wegerie this spark of 
eternal American hope: Thai his talents, frayed 
and only surgically repaired, will come to profit 
here. They are still within him as surely as the 
anile in photographs 10 years old. 


* *T went to watch him play, and he was 
[absolutely brilliant," recalled Marsh, who was 
| George Best's kindred spirit in 1960s England 
!“1 only had to look at him five or 10 minutes to 
•realize that he wasn't good, he was absolutely 
.'exceptional So mud) so that he was truly one of 
•the most exciting players I'd ever seen.” 

\ Roys Lon Wegerie was bora a good decade 
■after his brothers, Steve and Jeff, in Pretoria, 
[where soccer was largely a black sport Marsh 
.wasn’t the first to see something in him. His 
‘headmaster in Pretoria offered to mate Wegerie 
[a prefect if he would forsake soccer to represent 
[the school in rugby and cricket, tbe accepted 
[while sports. “I was frowned upon because 1 
■played soccer, really,” Wegerie said. "They 
[didn't give me a hard time, not really a hard 
•time. They just tried to encourage me not to.” 

; Ignoring the pressures of race. Wegerie be- 
•carae a student of tbe black soccer culture. He 
;so effectively worshiped Jomo Some, the 
.“Black Wizard” who would become a star on 
[the New York Cosmos, that eventually Wegerie 
[would become known as the “White Wizard” in 

‘South Africa. ... 

! “Tbe Brazilians- are recognized, obviously, as 

• tbe most sJoUful footbaffing nation ever, and the 

; think for tidsjgrpwng up in England, the skill 
.factor is not yay -important. Although it is a 
’certain necessity — you need to have a certain 
[amount of skill — but more than that you need 
•to have a big heart and a pair of iron lungs to 
[keep you running for 90 minutes. That’s tbeir 
priority in England. That’s probably what sepa- 
[ rates me from most of tbe players in England.” 

; That's what Rodney Marsh had in mind 
■ when he sent Wegerie to England right years 
;ago. Wegerie had made a previous attempt 
there, earning a two-month trial with Manches- 
ter United when he was 16. but an injury had 
forced him to return to South Africa. From 
there he had looked to America, where his 
brothers bad landed playing careers. Steve We- 
gerie, the Tampa Bay Rowdies' all-time leading 
sower, helped arrange a scholarship for Roy at 
the University of Smith Florida in Tampa. By 
1983, Ins sophomore year, Wegerie had met his 
future wife, Marie, a Floridian, and established 
most of the school's scoring records with 40 
goals -and 29 assists in just 36 matches. And he 
was often on the beach by halftime. 

“He was a complete player.” said Marsh, 

. . whp-as coach of the Rowdies signed tbe 20- 
year-old Wegerie in 1984. “He played with a 
complete love and passion and desire for the 
game, like a great artist, a painter. He laughed a 
lot when he played; he had a lovely open face 
when he laughed. By tbe end of the year I 
realized be was absohrtetyjust too good to play 
in this country.” 

Jitst as writ because the North American 
Soccer league folded after Wegerie had been 
nazned ifs rookie of the year. He spent two 
seasons with die Tacoma Stars of the Major 
Indoor Soccer League before Marsh sent him 
on to Chelsea in the English First Division — 


FIFA Names , Warns, 
First-Round Referees 

The Associated Press 

DALLAS — Soccer’s governing body has appointed 24 
referees for the World Cup but. for the first time, told them 
openly that they face the possibility being sent borne. 

“There arc no i/s and buts, the guidelines are clear and we 
expect the referee to follow them strictly,” FIFA’s president. 
Joao Havel ange, said after attending a meeting Tuesday of 
tbe nine-member referee committee. 

FIFA has (hanged several rules and reinterpreted others to 
open up tbe offense. The ehany * include awarding three 
points for a victory in the first round, the abolition or the 
backpass to the goalkeeper and a more liberal understanding 
of offside. Tackles from behind are to result in a red card. 

“Our action will be very simple, if a referee is found to be 
not following tbe rules, we will ask him to get out and pack 
for home,” said Farah Addo of Somalia, a member of the 
referee committee. 

FIFA lectured its referees and linesmen on the new 
guidelines in March at a weeklong seminar in Dallas. It gave 
them a 2^- hour “refresher course” Wednesday morning, 
followed by final fitness tests. 

The referees for the first 24 games (x-referee in 1990): 

Germany vs. Bolivia— -Arturo Pa Mo Bdzfa Carter, Mexico; Spain vs. South 
Korea — Peter Mlkketsea Denmark. 

united States vs. Switzerland — Francisco Lamoltna. Argentina: I la tv «v 
inland —MartoVtanDer Ends. Netherlmds; Colombia vs. Romania — Jomot 
Sharif. Syria. 

Be Islam vs. Morocco — Jose Torres. CotamMa; Norway vs. Mexico — 
Senior PufU, Hungary; Cameroon vs. Sweden — Alberto Teiada Peru. 

Brazil vs. Russia — An- Van Urn Kee Chons, Mauritius; Netherlands vs. 
Saudi Arabia — Manuef Diaz Vena. Spain. 

Argentina vs. Greece— Arturo Angeles. United States; Germany vs. Spain 
— Ernesto Fl/Iopi, Uruguay; Nigeria vs. Bulgaria — Rodrigo Ball I la. Casio 
RkzL 

Romania vs. Switzerland — x-Neil JoulnJ, Tunisia; United Slates vs. Colom- 
bia — FaMo Bombs. Italy. 

Italy vs. Norway — Helmut Knia. Germany; south Korea vs Bolivia — 
Leslie Mott ram, Scotland. 

Mexico vs. Ireland — x-Kurf RotMIsberger. Switzerland.- Brazil vs. Camer- 
oon — Arturo Brizto Carter. Mexico; Sweden vs. Russia — Joel Qutmou. 
Franca 

Saudi Arabia vs. Morocco— Philip Dan, England: Belgium vs Netherlands 
—Renata Montana Brazil; Argent ino vs. Nigeria — Bn Karissan. Sweden, 
^utaarfa vs. Greece — Afl Moh am med Burial m. United Arno Emirates. 



Brazil Loses Gomes to Injury 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches (leg) were expected to be available 
With the opening match just two for Monday’s match with Saudi 
days away, injuiy reports were gel- Arabia, but Norway, which opens 
ting most of tbe attention at the Sunday against Mexico, remained 


World Cup tr aining sites. 


worried about goalie Erik Tborsi- 


Brazil received a big blow when vedt and his troublesome shoulder. 
Ricardo Gdmes, tbe rollback who Claudio Reyna, the youngest 
was a cornerstone or the defense, player on die U.S. team, appeared 
was cut from the team because of a likely to start Saturday against 


cake and having a lot of laughs in 
Oak Brook. Illinois, as the coach of 
the 1990 champions paid a visit to 
tbe team’s headquarters outside 
Chicago. 

“There was never any conflict, 
there was only a divergence of in- 
terests,” Vogts said. 

• Brazil’s Bebeto said he would 


thigh injury. He had beat a star on Switzerland. The 20-year-old mid- hire security guards to look after, 
tbe national team since 1987 and fielder hadn't worked out since last his family in Rio de Janeiro after 
captained it in 1990. Wednesday night, when be pulled his wife and brother were mugged 


captained it in 1990. Wednesday night, when be pulled 

Brazil, which opens Monday his right hamstring, 
against Russia, replaced him with His teammate. Tbomas Dooley, 
Ronaldo, who was en route from said be had signed a two-year con- 


there Sunday nighL 

The striker’s wife, Denise de Oli- 
veira, and his brother, Wilson Car- 
valho de Oliveira, were robbed by 
two men armed with guns who 


Clmnu PajiBB- The 4rxi-iiioi Pteu 

Bodo lllper used feflow goalkeeper Andreas Kopke as a spring- 
board to tbe start of training a! the German camp outside Chicago. 


Japan. tract worth SI million to play two uZST 

BuT Pavel Sadyrin. tbe Russian more years with Bayer Leverkusen, 
coach, dismissed the loss, saying, Spain’s coach, Javier Clemente, went up to their car E they 
"G6mes is not their mam player. said veteran goalkeeper Andoni stopped at a traffic light, ordered 
y< ” UkC fubizarreta. banned from Friday's iH^ut and then stolfShevS^ 
Gomes in ibe squad. South Korea game after being sent _ •- - , _ , ... .. 

Roy Keane limped out of Ire- of f m finaL qualifying match. 

land s warmup match against the aga ; n q Denmark? would definitely ® aron -.cn lia “ d J*f FA torsetectal- 
U.S. ander-21 squad, and while his pteyagainst Germany in Spain's l? 8 t? mdday hca1, 

manager. Jack Chariton, played %condmateh. ^ 1101 

down the groin muscle injury it m , , . overly bothered by the soaring tem- 

gave him another worry he could fi * Primes. 

dn without, having already lost Ke- Lu* were rite Spcdung m the W; 11 ;hi og lo OS ub- 

|I m Moran and Tonv Cascanno for Sfd St ^” fidddamaged H* ?f Fairfax, Vugmix during a 
Saturdays against haly. by commencement CTerciscs. ^ u^ .^nu .1 ^ tatu pa,- 
German defender Thomas I ? s ? lo ^ centigrade (97 

Strunz was recovering from a ham- -‘^^ 00 ? e S. st £ 8 f. a ?1 4 ’ 100 , Fahrenheit), Mejia Baron accused 

string injury quicker titan expected °* J* J ,eld Iefl m 01 FIFA of putting commercial inter- 

and could^e ready for the touma- ^ U ° W ^|’ r ^ d scass ncar before player safety, 

meat-opening match Friday „ . . V. . , . _ “I would tell those gentlemen 

against Bolivia, while veteran de- University officials termed the f rom FIFA to take their suits off 

fender-cum-midfieider Guido damage minor but World Cup or- ^ p iay soccer,” he said, sweating 
Buchwald was back to full training ganizers brought in turf specialists, profusely. “If they could choose 
after a thigh strain. • The German coach. Berti between midday and 7 in the eve- 

Dutcb midfielder Frank Rijkaard Vogts, and Franz Beckenbauer mng 1 am sure they would prefer to 
(leg) and defender John de Wolf made peace, drinking coffee, eating play at 7.” [AP. Reuters. AFP) 


agains t Bolivia, while veteran de- university oniciais termea ine 
fcnder-cum-midfielder Guido damage minor but World Cup or- 
Buchwaid was back to full training ganizers brought in turf specialists, 
after a thigh strain. • The German coach. Berti 

Dutch midfielder Frank Rijkaard Vogts, and Franz Beckenbauer 
(leg) and defender John de Wolf made peace, drinking coffee, eating 


sidelines UEFA Seeds Teams 

Clarke Returns to Flyers For European Cup 

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Bob Clarke re- £" * 

turned Wednesday to the Philadelphia Flyrrs;' 

not only as president and general manager but . Mj ' 

part-ownership of the NHL team. ** ™ bccn L 10 P {or next season s Euro- 

To gpt Clarke, who helped win Stanley Cups Ca P r - Amsterdam and Man- 

in 1974 and 1975, the Flyers gave tbe Florida UnJ “ d - UEF * Wednesday. 

Panthers an undisclosed amount of money and ran^^s arc based on teams perfor- 

A cprnnri.mrmri draft iw^ DhtV^ torn Ounces OVCI HVC S C SS OPS. 


The IHT World Cup Competition 

Win fabulous prizes. 


a second-round draft pick. Clarke had two 
years left on his contract as tbe Panthers’ GM. 

• The Boston Celtics of the NBA fired Dave 
Gavitt as senior executive vice president and 
eplaced him with a former player, M.L. Carr. 

For the Record 

Vgay Sind) of Fiji withdrew from the US. 
Open golf championship starting Thursday be- 
cause of a back mjmy. (Reuters) 

Brian Dmdrap, the Danish international, 
signed a three-year contract with Glasgow 
Rangers almost two weeks after agreeing to 
leave the Italian dub Fiorentina. (AP) 

Simon Prior, the British motorcycle race r. 
died late Tuesday after doctors in Germany 
removed him from life support systems. (AP) 
Bd Xrayn of China, who set a world best for 
the women’s 50-meter backstroke this year, was 
suspended a month by FTNA for using the 
stimulant epbedrine. (Reuters) 

The Mercedes-Benz engine that dominated 
tbe Indianapolis 500 for the Team Penske will 
be restricted to 52 indies (132 centimeters) of 
boost for 1995, the U.S. Auto Club said. (AP) 


UEFA released a list on Wednesday ranking 
all 43 national champions in its member states, 
of whom the top 24 will be entered for the 
European or Champions' Cup. The other 19 
teams wfl] be entered in the UEFA Cup. 

AC Milan and the teams ranked second to 
seventh will qualify directly for the competition 
proper. The teams in places nine to 16 will be 
drawn against teams ranked 17th to 24th for a 
bome-and-away preliminary round. 

The preliminary round matches are set for 
Aug. 10 and 24, with group matches starting 
SepL 14, the quarterfinals next March, the semi- 
finals in April and the final May 24. 

Preliminary round draws for all three Euro- 
pean dnb competitions and draws for the four 
UEFA Champions League groups will be held 
in Geneva on July 20. 

Top seedings: 

1. AC Mltan, 2. Ala* Amsterdam, 1 Mancfteslw United. 4. 
Severn MunJcti. 5. Bar ce lona, 6- Bef»nco.7.Saorto* uoecow.S. 
RSC AndertedU. *. Paris St-Germain. 10. Glass cm Ranoers. 
11. Casino Samira. 12. IFK Gothenburg. 

IX StEaua Bucharest, U. Gotatasara y. IS Sparta P rona. 16. 
Hatduk Sent 17. AEK Athens. IS Matafcl Motto. 19. Slovon 1 
arattsJavo.2Q.Servette.2l. fc vuc Samsuno. 22. sifrebora if. 
21 FC Avenir Beggen. 24. Rosentnra BK. 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBAUL 


Major League Standing* 


AMERICAN ueAOU« 

- EortDMsMi 

W U PeL 


York . 17 w 

Bamdura . 34 tt SSI 

Buiton 32 T9 J2S 

Detroit ' 32 79 SIS 

Taranto- 1 : . » 3® A84 

■•’-i Central DMHoa 
QevetaM 35 25 JO 

Ottawa ■■-. - 34 24 SSI 

Mtanauta 36 TS S 45 

Kansas aty' “ ■ 32 W SIA 

MBWnuiiM 27 3S 

. west Diwsioa 

T«ns 31 31 J00 

Sentte - 24 34 

^uBtoorfu . 27 38 A1S 

Ortdond , 28 43 3 17 

. — ;NATtOI*AL LEAGUE 

.--.--.a.*--. East Dtvislea 

■ - - ■ .’ w L Pet. 

Alfoqtar -. « 21 

•tomt-Sa;-- . ■ » 24 AW 

CMIUtoW ria.:. 32 33 An 



■ MwvSit'r 

- 29 34 ■ 
Caotral EWvHUa 

JM 

12 

• ! . 

Oociniiati ... 

- . 35 28 . 

SSL 

—“• 

i 


35 28 

SS6 

— 

' i 

-J* j 


'32 29 

SB 

2 

"totoBWh- 

S 34 

AS2 

tv* 



24 37 
-Hfcst DtoMoa 

jn 

10 

, | 


> •' - .34 38 

sn 

— 

! 

. -eeifafc 

• 29 34 

MO 

4V* 


- JtyKniuiiiKit 

» 35 

453 

5 

i 

• 

22- 48 

MS 

!0tt 


d^r*!Jne Score# 


i_- 4* I 

.5^# j 


.«*-■ 4 

-,-y 


■SSfe."-- 5f2*-iuS B vwiuamfc Horn own tt l. Jones <«, Hudrt 
q y t>Ba *- , :. UB m VLJ m and EowMo.-TVTOt H Icier SOT C5J. Go- 

Knonr LL xfb f™v W "wwortna. w-wu- 

W oad SAtwmnvW-AW**- ^ L-Torr» ** su-HuWs m. 

Jue .^Hewtoo. fctaNWl tin. . 

Cfcveton* WU* catantSa m HQ MB— 1 " B 1 

'ShSB&aiK ' - r' . . a Atonte m « ItoM l 8 

■SS s Si . * 


Mariomes, Slovens 13}. Gothrie (7). Wllia 
(B). Costal (8). Awllero 19) and watoeciu 
Finnvold. Bantdieod (Si. Harris (75. Russell 
19) and Btrrvmn. W— Stevens. 2-1. L — Ftnn- 
voM, (M. Sv-Aewllera (14). HR-Boston. 
Dawson (12). 

^i jnii^ nhi W Ml MB — 1 1 8 

CRy 888 n 880-0 7 2 

FWev arto CTunw ; Gubie» Bratwr (» oad 
Moctataae. W— Finiev. 5* L-euHOa. 4*. 
New rort 888 811 882-4 9 8 

Baltimore tw lie 088—3 M 3 

Mu tool butt XXemandez (7), HltettascK 
(B). Wlctanon {•). Howe (9) and leyrttz,MeP 
vtn W: OouCst, Ekhhom (4), L&Smtm (91 
and Hot In, Tackett (9». w-Httcticoek, 1-V 
L — LfcSmlth, l-l Su -H ow e 151- HR— Bom- 
mare, Devereau* (81. 

Oakland 2*2 188 084-5 11 0 

Chicago 888 880 011-3 5 1 

Ontiveros, Briscoe (81, Eekeratev (■) and 
smnbaeh; Sanderson. DeLeon <4),McCaskJII 
(Bl.Cooli (9) and LdVomera. W-OnHverae.2- 
1 L— Sanderson. 4-2. Sv— Eckersiev. 171.' 
HR— Newson 12). 

Oetrud 3S ll« 88* *88 4 — U 18 1 

Milwaukee 818 204 1» «0e 8-8 1* 3 

03 km tags) 

Gulllckson. Gardiner 141. Beaver (8). 
Orawn (9), SJtavte (131. Cotir (121. Hoiem- 
man (13) and Kreuter; Bones. Orosco «>• 
igncsMk M. Fatten tv). Uovd (Ilk Henrr 
(13) and Haraer. W-Gohr, ML L— Llont 1-1 
HRs— Detroit, Felix (81. Milwaukee, Nilsson 
(41. WWW BJ. . .. . 

Seattle iw M3 m m w is • 

Tew M W « « M H 3 

ns tamings! 

SalUkL TXtavto (4), MJ11II (71. Avata 18). 
[121 ml Hasebnan, D.WUaon (9); 
(tagertpOdver «),Conioi»tor oo).Hanevcuti 
(MM. WtUtortt® 111), Dimllh (13) wid Utodrl- 
auec, W Gossan A ' ML L-DSmMl. 14. 

HRs aeottte CrtHev 2 (28). 

NATIONAL LBAGUE 
iniennr 284 138 W4-7 IS 8 

r— . pioaCbCO 811 181 8B1 4 1* 1 

Will lams. Hampton (4). Jones (8), Hadefc 
(91 and Eow«o.- Torres. H Icier son (Si. Go- 
itL Frey (« and Mo nmacWB. W-Wl- 
ilams, 84 L— TorrtL M. sv-Hixtok m. 


and Girard; Mercker.WoMera (8),MeMlctioe( y a kull IS x 0 477 

(9)and JA4mez.C7Bnen (9).W— Mercker.5-1. HansAln 25 2S 0 *77 

L— RItz. M. Sv— McMIchael 05). HRs— Color- Yokohamo 24 a a M 

ods, BJctwBe 04). Atlanta. Klesko (11). HJroshlmo 21 3 0 429 

PMladetpMa ON use no— 3 7 1 

Nee- York IN BOO BIO— 2 7 1 Wodoesday-5 Results 

BLMunaz.Stocun>fi (7},D_lones (8) and Dout- Hanstiin 1 Yomiurl a 
tan; Gooden. Mason 18) and Hundley. ChunJetil 1Z Yakull 2 
W — BAltunaz. 2-2. L— Gooden, 33. Sv—D_/anes HlrasMmo 3. Yotohamn 2. 10 Innings 
<171. HR-Ptinadctatua. Knee m. 

FlOrMa IN 280 504-7 10 0 P °^ RC , US ” 0e 

SL Units ON 8N 088-8 5 1 » £ t per 

Hough end TtoBtay; Pandas. Habvenm. 
g vsrsgeid (81, R. Rodriguez (9) ond Poqnoni. 

W-l^^^-PotaCtoS.I^HR-1^^ £“ 2 S 5 .« 

PttHM ' ON on 831-7 15 0 “ J J2 

M netieui jn 280 34x— t2 15 3 Kbiectsu 1» 33 1 Jo5 

ZSmHti. Minor (4). Micell (41. De«rey IB) Wednesday's Results 

and Staugtd; P J JMart Inez. Heredia 14), Rotas Selbu 5. Lotte 4 
(7L Wettetand (8) and Wehster. W— PJAtar- Data! 7 . Nippon Ham 0 
MIWZ.4-1L— ZSmlth.4-4.Sv— Wetteland (12). Orix 8. Kintetsu 4 
OidlHWII BN IN 811— a » 1 _ 

Los Angeles 988 0W 8ho-5 a 1 V>*S-r3'" 

Rita. ARafAt (7). j. Bran tier <8) and Tau- ? J* 

bensee; AStado and Pfazzu. W-Astacta 4-5. 

NHL Stanley Cup Hnal^ 

Smtoego S m m Si* ” a TUESDA Y'S RESULT 

Foster, Plane (7).8outlsra (Bl.Mvers 19). ., Honoers mi seoes « 

Crtm (111 and Wnuns and Parvnl not; ^T ? n,,r , \ 

SSandarL!Vtauser(A,5aoerf7).Ta8akaf7). ‘ ' 

Elliott (81. PAMarttnez (91. Ho H m en dll First period— 1. New York. Leetch 11 

ond AusmusW— Myerd. ML L— Huffm an. M l hov, Messier), 11:02. 2. New lorta Grsn 
Sv— Crim, (2). HRs— son Diego. AuanmQ); ' (Kovalev, Zubov). 14:45 (ppi. Pent 
CMcaga Dunston (51. — UimmAVon(aruss-cneckln<».i4:ID.- 


NHL Stanley Cup Final 


Sen Diego IN BN 311 ns M a uiu ^rto l i 

Foster, Plaoc (7),8outlsia (Sj.Mvers 19), R angers mi senes *-j 

Crtm ID) and Wilkins ond Parvnl 1101; ^T ? n,,r ! ! 

3SQnoers.*ta use r t si. Sauer m. Tabaka (71. * ‘ ' . * 

Elliott (81. PAMarMnez (91. Ho H i nan (11) First period— 1. New York. Leetch 11 (Zu- 

and Ausmus.W— Myers, T-XL — Hoffman, 23L bov. Messier), 11:02. 2. New torta Graves 10 
Sv— Crim, (2). HRs— son Dleuo. Ausmui (3); (Kovalev, Zubov). 14:45 (ppi. Penallles- 
CMcaga Dunston (51. — UimmAVon(aruss-ctteckln<».i4:n;Hedl- 

aon. van Irouohlnaj, 18:50; Tllkanen. NY 

Tim Michael Jordan Watch (rauuMnui. w:a 

Second period— 1 Vancouver. Linden 11 
TUESDAY'S GAME : Jordon **ent Her -3 In (Glynn Bure), 5:21 ishl. 4. NY. Mrssler 12 
a SO (ass to Memphis. He Struck out once. (Graves. Noonan), 13:29 loo) Penallies- 
rtfidied fin) on OAlnHeU error and tad four — Brown, van (Interference). 4-3* Boti'Ch, 


putaufs In right Reid. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan la baftbio 304 
(4S-fbr-221) with lo rwa, nine douatos, one 
triple, 24 RBls. 30 *045 M strikeouts cmd 15 


V» (trtaering ), 12;44; Messier. NY inookinol. 
14:39. 

Third p e ri od— 5. Vancouver. Linden 12 


itolm bases In 25 attempts. He has 99 outruns! 

am assist ond «x wrore In rlgM flew. ” Y ^ h ^ 

(rougnlnu), 10^55. MacTavish. Nr iroui 

Japanese Leagues moi. lo^s. 


Yomhiri 

CtHirtchl 


Cestral Lougpc 
W L. T 
34 19 0 

27 25 0 


(roughing), 10:55; MacTavish. Nr irougn- 
tool. lo-Js. 

Shots oa goal— Vancouver 9-13-0—30. New 
York 13-14-9—35; power -ol BY epporfimilles- 
— Vancouver 1 ot2; New York 2ot 3: eaalle*- 
-^/oncouver. McLean, 15-2 l2S siWS-33 
saves). Hew Yorv, RlcMer, '30-311. 


Winners will be chosen from an official drawing. 
The first 16 entries drawn, with at least 6 correct 
responses, will win one of the prizes listed below, 
determined from the order in which they are 
drawn. 

Grand Prize: Two United Airlines business class 
round-trip Europe/New \brk tickets plus five 
nights accommodation at the Stanhope Hotel in 
New York. 

Five second prizes: Sprint Collectors Game pre- 
paid phone cards in celebration of the World Cup. 
Five third prizes: AT Cross. 22k gold, diamond 
cut. Roller ball pens, from the Signature 
Collection. 

Five fourth prizes: Gold Pfeil men’s wallets. 


HERE’S HOW TO ENTER 


For each of the 12 days leading up to the World 
Cup. the IHT will publish a question in which the 
response predicts various outcomes of facets of 
the World Cup. There are 12 questions in all. 

After answering the question each day in the 
coupon prov ided below, hold your responses and 
send them all at once to the IHT. A minimum of 
6 responses must be postmarked on or before June 
17, 1994 — the World Cup kickoff day. 

Only clippings from the newspaper will be 
accepted. Pin nocopies and faxes do not qualify. 


RULES AND CONDITIONS 


1 . I ndfviduaJ coupons will not be accepted. 

Minimum of 6 coupons to qualify. 

2. Cut-off date is postmarks of the first day of the World 
Cup — June 17. 1994. 

3. Valid only where legal. 

4. Entries will not be accepted from staff and families of 
the IHT newspaper, its agents and subsidiaries. 

5. Only original coupons will be considered valid. 
Photocopies and faxes are not acceptable. 

6. No correspondence will be entered into. Proof of 
postage will not be accepted as proof of receipt. 

7. No cash alternative to prizes. 

B. In some countries, the law forbids participation in this 
competition for prize awards. However, in these 
countries, you can still play for fun. The competition is 
void where illegal. 

9. Winners will be drawn on day after the end of the Worid 

Cup and published in the IKT on Thursday 21 July. 

10. On all matters, the editor's decision is final. 

11 . The Editor reserves the nght in his absolute discretion to 
disqualify any entry, competitor or nominee, or to waive 
any rules in the event of circumstances outside our 
control arising which, in his opinion, makes it desirable 
to cancel the competition at any stage. 

12. The winners will be the first correct answers containing 
six or more coupons picked at random from all entries. 




Group A 

USA 

SWITZERLAND 

COLOMBIA 

ROMANIA 

Group B 

BRAZIL 
RUSSIA — 
CAMEROON 
SWEDEN 

Group C 
GERMANY 
BOLIVIA 
SPAIN 

KOREA RERJBUC 

Group D 

ARGENTINA 
GREECE 
NIGERIA 
BULGARIA 
Group E 
ITALY 

IRELAND REPUBLIC 
NORWAY 
MEXICO 

Group F 
BELGIUM 
MOROCCO 
NETHERLANDS 
SAUDI ARABIA 


TODAY’S QUESTION 


From which team will the Most Valuable Player 
come from? 


Your response 


Job Tide: - 

Company: . 

Address: ______ 

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Paw? 1» 


ART BUCHWALD 


Nothing hut the Truth 



W ASHINGTON — The tobac- 
co companies are striking 
back at their detractors with full- 
page advertisements giving their 
side of the story. They are using 
their CEOs to tell the truth on how 
. . safe tobacco is. 

I have mixed feelings on this. On 
the one hand. I am a born-again 
non-cigar user and I no longer be- 
lieve in smoking. On the other 
hand, since I 
write a newspa- 
per column, f 
certainly know 
that the print 
media can use 
all the revenue 
from advertise- 
ments it can get. 

The tobacco mb a* 
people have in- pi 
spired other in- : , 

dustries to Buchwald 
launch similar "educational'' cam- 
paigns. 

For example, the Poison Gas 
Manufacturers have raised a giant 
war chest to combat their critics who 
maintain that gas is bad for you. 
Howard Caync. the president of 

Gocdfellow Poison Gas. intends to 
take his message to the public. 

He told me: "The Poison Gas. 
executives are sick and tired of be- 
ing scapegoats for the health lob- 
bies and the do-gooders in Con- 
gress who don't believe in free 
choice when it comes to poison ga>. 
Our position has aiwa>s been that 
>ou can never have a gas-free soci- 
ety because you can't stop people 
from enjoying themselves. 

"Besides, poison -gas products 
generate enormous ia.w that pay 


■ Beauty and the Beast" 
Sets a Broadwav Record 

VVvi Yurt: Tima Semic 

NEW YORK — Despite win- 
ning only one Tony award — for 
costume design — "Beauty and the 
Beast.” the Disney Co. extravagan- 
za. has claimed a Broadway record 
with single-day ticket sales of SI. 3 
million. 

The total, on the day after the 
awards presentations, surpassed the 
previous single-day sales high or 
S920.00G. recorded by “The Phan- 
tom or the Opera" on the day its box 
office c-pened in November l Q 5”. 


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lor education and public transpor- 
tation." 

1 raised the question of the sec- 
ondary effects or poison gas. 

Howard responded defensively: 
"There is no scientific proof that 
poison gas affects people who are 
standing ncu to those who use it. 
In my advertisement I plan to say 
that despite congressional specta- 
cles we do not spike Goodfellow 
gas to make it addictive. As a mat- 
ter of fact, we are constantly work- 
ing to reduce the levels of toxins m 
our product K> meet the guidelines 
in the surgeon-general's report," 

□ 

He continued: “The Anti-Poison 
Gas lobby, led by zealots such as 
Congressman Waxntan. would real- 
ly like to eliminate the use of gas 
altogether, depriving people of their 
life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. 
Our industry maintains that when 
you prohibit gas sales you close one 
more gate on freedom. 

“We believe that there is room 
for both — people who enjov poi- 
son gas and those who bate iL Wo 
can live together. The poison-gas 
users can have places set aside lor 
their enjoyment. The non-gab peo- 
ple can request gas masL? in a res- 
taurant if they feel threatened by 
the fumes. 

“It's demeaning for the govern- 
ment to force us” to print on our 
product labels (hat poison gas is 
dangerous 10 a person's health, 
when in fact there is no evidence to 
support this.” 

□ 

I told Cay re Lhat he had a goeJ 
message and 1 only prayed lhaL the 
nation would heed it. 

He replied; "I know that the 
electorate will pay attention once 
thev are given our facts. Too much 
spinach will kill you. too much am- 
munition will kill you. and too 
much poison gas will kill you. Used 
in moderation our product c.m in- 
duce pleasure, lower Wood pres- 
sure and give a very good cholester- 
ol reading.” 

I was leaving as the advertising 
people came in to go over the 
Goodfellow copy. 

"How about a photo accompa- 
nying the ad showing you taking an 
oath in congressional committee to 
tell the truth and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God?" The adver- 
tising VP suggested. 

“Why not. We might as well go 
for broke." Cayne --aid. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBE NE. THI RSDAY. Jl NE 16. 1994 



rtih< 


O' 


Poet and Images of Love 


By Alan Riding 

■Veu- York runa Vnm- 

P ARIS— .As Ocia'-io Pttz approached 
the age of SO. his thought* turned back 
to love. “Isn't it a bit ridiculous, an he end 
of my days, to write a book about love?" 
he asked himself, thinking lhat a satirical 
sonnel might be more appropriate. "Or is 
it a farewell, a testament?" he wondered. 

But the idea of such a book had long 
been with him. His poetry had spoken of 
love since he was a teenager, but when he 
fell in love 30 years ago. he decided he had 
more to say. He wanted to study the image 
of love in our civilization, the state of Ivvc 
at the end of the 20th century. Finally, he 
has done so. 

“Our democratic capitalist society has 
converted Eros into an employee of Mam- 
mon.” Paz. a Mexican writer who won the 
Nobel Prize in Literature ir. I 0 ** 1 , 'aid in a 
recent conversation here. 

“Profit, gain and the extraordinary ma- 
terialism of our society are weakening the 
human condition. So my book about love 
is a defense of the individual." 

It is also a poetic analysis of the very 
notion of love: how love i\ bom in the fire 
of sexuality and emerges through the 
Barnes of eroticism to become .-omeihina 
else, mysterious, rare, exclusive. "And you 
cannot talk about love uithoui laik/ng 
about its complement, death. " he added. 

The book. "The Double Flame L*'ve 
and Eroticism.” just ■■'in in France and to 
be published in the United State' next 
year by Har court Brace, .-evincd he 
uppermost in Poz's mind. But the real 
purpose of his vijit 10 Pans t'o'iii hi.- home 
in .Mexico City wj, t.« participate 111 a 
series of homage* celebrating '«> &.‘ih 
birthday, which wjs on March 2 i. 

Paz feel:, at home here. He fir«: visited 
Paris in l 0 .*”; he wjs influeiueJ hy the 
Surrealist movement: he ••••as .'tjti*-ned 
here as a diplomat for a Mai >•: If year-, 
and his wife. Marie-Josc. i- Parisian. He 
also seemed relieved t- V away from 
Mexico, where he is engaged in t. instant 
political warfare with leftist inidlectuai-. 

But in Paris, "le p.-eie Paz" e.ir. 

escape questions a be -in Me vice's power 
struggle*. Here, there 1 - more curiosity 
about his new heard. "I re-11 ;il !jm winter 
and stopped 'h.o ir,g. th.‘:i 1 deeided to iet 
it grow." he -aid with :« v.on.-r*ir.il.*nal 
smile. "1 a -iked in the mirror and '! 
am the same and I am another.' " 

The idea of twin pers*'nalitie* ha- . 1 !-. • 
appealed l«.» him. "Yeah -aid. the >' ••! ihv 
poem is a mask.' he •• .TV. --r.. "i nave 
invented a poet who tv tAta-io Paz who ;? 
not exactly me. but !• another per<**n. a 
character, a Mexican p*>et my age in the 
late 20th century who ha- known the things 
I have known hut not me." 



r , - 7 ’ - - ,*••" 

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Octat io j’az at 80: “My book about lo\e Is a defense of the individual." 


ihio gainer — of words, of inuges — 
are j!*o much present in hi? roetr-. as is 
apparent in Eliot Weinberger's translation 
hi? poem “Writing.” from the l%0*: 
! Jras these iti:!ers 
..V :>.e Jui u.-lI* t m it’ll/ k. 

A >:J >/■•.. ■ -i c r ;ww 
•I -hi J—.: iv«« r t. 

r> ar r ■ r-.- .*eie- i ? disputes the description 
:' r'- ••c' -.• a- .-uTeoJi.-tk. "‘\iiai most 
•T.7--.--4.V mr jS-.tn the Surrea-iji* was 
\ “ r-. rj- .;an».=. ' nesaid. "Luis Bunuel 
. r.vz me. ‘Li iter, k'ciavio. iike me. you 
erterec SuTeahstn no: for its aesthetic*, 
bui for iu ethics.' Exactly, i said.” 

He endorsed its break with the past and 
it.- libertoriin tradition, he said, but he 
oniy dabbled in the automatic writing that 
wa* it' hterar- trademark. And r-‘ the time 


be joined ’die movement ir. ire mic-I94t*s. 
although Andre Breton renttuned its "in- 
spirins force.” Surrealism was in decline. 

Other inf 1 u 2 r.ee> were more inparunL 
first that of die “nev,” poet* of Latin 
America, among them Vicente Huidobro. 
Cesar Vallejo. Pablo Nerjca and Jorge 
Luis Borges! Then, as Paz spent two years 
in the United Slates, exposure to T. S. 
Eiiot. Wiliiaci Carlos Williams. Ezra 
Pound and other modernists “affected me 
a Iol” he sard. 

Since the when he published 

"The Labyrinth of Solitude.” his classic 
study of life, thought and L-adition in 
Mexico. Paz ba« aisc- been known as a 
prolific essayls’.. producing many works 
with a strong phtfoscphical beet." And he 
dedicated w-era! veors to hi> raonumental 


work on Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the 
17 th-century Mexican poet and mm. 

But it is as a poet that most enuo 
expect him to be remembered. So docs it 
matter that few read poetry today? “Those 
whodo ” hesaid. “are young people, wom- 
en and dissidents of all kinds: philosophi- 
cal. sexual, political. It has become an art 
on the margins of society. It is the other 
voice. It lives in the catacombs, but it 
won't disappear." 

He worries more about the “o^al- 
tfaough he has never written one. “Demo- 
cratic capitalism applied to literature is 
mass production," hesaid. “Stores arefiDed 
with novels with big titles, they sdi huge 
amounts for three months, then disappear. 
Writers should produce works that endure. 
So. in a sense, clandestine poetry is a cri- 
tique of the consumer soaety. 

A short man with deep blue eyes, whose 
features echo both his Indian and Spanish 
ancestry, Paz talks with passion on every 
imaginable subject. But after literature, no 
subject stirs, him more than politics, or, 

rather, his disenchantment with commu- 
nism. a point of view that long isolated 
him from the mains tream of Latin Ameri- 
can and European intellectuals. 

As a young man , he was a leftist and he 
came ck&c to fighting on the Republican 
side in the Spanish CMl War after nejwneu 
such himinari« as Andre MaJraux, Stephen 
Spender and Neruda on a trip to Spain in 
1937. But he discovered the dark ride of 
Stalinism, and when he returned to Paris in 
1945, his doubts about communism were 
fanned by reading George Orwell and Ar- 
thur Koestler. 

In 1968. he resigned as the Mexican 
ambassador to India to protest the killings 
of student protesters in Mexico City. But 
by then he was no less a critic of Havana 
than he was of Moscow. Soon, the left was 
denouncing him as a heretic and be was 
scorning his critics as apologists for totali- 
tarianism. In the process, his friendships 
with Gabriel Garda Marquez and Carlos 
Fuentes fell apart. 

“I think lhat for intellectuals, politics 
has replaced ideology and to some extent 
religion." Paz said. “These are religious 
wars and also personal wars.” 

But in the quiet of a Left Bank hotel, Paz 
preferred to talk about the crisis of values 
facing modem society, about the need 10 
create a new notion of the individual, about 
poetry and — why not? — about love. 

“First comes the involuntary and exclu- 
sive attraction: I love you and no one 
else." he said, eagerly returning to the 
theme of his book. “Then I ask for reci- 
procity and the object 1 love tuns into the 
subject that loves me. This has nothing to 
do with sexuality. This doesn’t happen in 
eroticism. We only Find it in love. But like 
oil important things, it happens little." 


WEATHER 

Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 

' 


WEEKEND DESTINATIONS 


■'O': 


TetUv ~cm-cm 

Mi 5 h Le* Vl .nigh tew tt 
C.T Z* C.7 C.V 


KEUrUD 


Jefferson 
To Shoot 

The Jefteson Airplaw: 

suit as&insi Berkeley 
dajmia& the software t . . 
the idea For its 

outer screetFsawos ftxatrihc' io£ 
band’s final aBwfi. “30 'Samds 
ChraTS r uiieriarid, p nkastd 
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claim. TarwS--:- .-‘l ■--£■£■■■£*£0 

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since hip rcpbcemsBU - 

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in Los Angeles, an AfBSbenefit 

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ticket Still Jack Wa&m 
Danson and Don .Heafcgr 
more than 600 guests who dek 
paid $250 at a New Yorkbericfit^o 
aw some land arowuLW'-tfifei 
Pond, akbrawd by ^ 
pber in his 1SS4 classic ’ymiedO- 

D\'Vy.; : ;! v^r 

Former Tory minister Sr 
ny Buck, who gave custody 
beloved King Charles sjapids io 
Bienvetuda Perei-BIttift^Sftft 
their divorce last year.TlKa.wiijr. 
corned them back borne in thc-lit- 
est chapter in the saga of Sr Aji- 
tinny, <55. and Brenwaafa, ■ % 

They made headlines eaiSdr tfcs 
year after she sold the stmy of Itt*. 
affair with the then chi® nf 
Defense Staff. Peter Ha«fiag, l w^ 

promptly' resignedl Sir T Aiah0ay-' 

lives m London with lus new AreK. 
sian-bora wife, Tamara NotasEk*. 
yan. 55, Biervenida hi now manwi 
to an art dealer, NkholssSok^M.:. 


Franz Welser-Moed, tt. Abe 
Austrian-born musical director "of 
the London Philharroonjc OitAan. 
tra, will take up a sunSarpori at the’ 
Zurich Qpem in the 1995~96 xssod^ 

O 

Mkitaei Jackson has beeh’wqtk- 
ing at a Manhattan studio ottoauj 
songs for an album titled “‘ffiswy’'. 
that he plans to release this fall. 


INTEJtNAIlOmt 

CLASSIFIED -:jk 

Appears on l*ape&-4& 


I UflU'JHOfLlt*/ 

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North America 

A sizzling neat wavs mil 
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United Siaios east ot Inc 
Rocliies this weekend. 
Tciiumo to Monnea* win nave 
noi weather Saiuidav Pleas- 
am weatiier >s eipecied by 
Monday. Scafierac? snowed 
and ibwioersionns wd| mo-je 
mw rhe souHwasiem United 
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Europe 

Noribern Scandinavia will 
remam cool ihu weekend 
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IO Minsk Madrid ihrougn 
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seasonable weather 


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2:35 

SyS 

clouds ana sun 

20/68 

12/55 

12153 

12 

NW 

2tW0 • 

Izmir 

sunny 

30. , ae 

19/W 

20.55 

1-2 

**v» 

•15-25 

Te' Avw 

sunny 

31/85 

2170 

1C/5C 


N 

15-32- 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 







Barbados 

showers 

31/88 

26/79 

23-82 

1-2 

E 

25<S 

► fission 

sunny 

33. “91 

23.77 

28.82 

C-1 

E 

Z5-35 

S: Thomas 

partly sunny 

33/91 

26/79 

23-82 

1-2 

c 

22-30 

Ham in or/ 

parity sunny 

3OT6 

2271 

27/&0 

1-Z 

c 

£0-35 

Asia/Pacjfie 








Penang 

Ihunderstorms 

32/56 

2&79 

30/36 

0-1 

sv/ 

15-25 ‘ 

PlMAei 

rfiumJeisidnns 

3391 

2679 

29.54 

0-: 

sw 

15JS 

Bab 

c to uds and sun 

33/31 

26/79 

28-62 

C-1 

sv/ 

12-25 

Cebu 

pant/ sunny 

33/91 

24/75 

31.58 

0-1 

E 

12-2£ 

Pabn Beach. Aus. 

douds and sun 

16/61 

7/44 

18^4 

1-2 

w 

40-55. 

Bay ol islands. NZ 

sunny 

19/66 

9K8 

1 9.-56 

0-1 

NW 

1MB. 

Shwahama 

showers 

27/80 

2271 

21.70 

1-2 

SE 

30-50 

Honolulu 

doixls and sun 

30/86 

2373 

26.79 

1-3 

E 

£0-25. 



Iravci in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


83i> 


aaiKgcttnt Imagine a world where \ c>u can c;dl country to country :ls easily as yi ju can from home. And 
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83b>9^j^^^^S language, since it's translated insundy. Call y».>ur clients at 3 a.m. knowing they Jl get the message in 
your voice at a uiore polite hour. All this is now piAssible u ith AKE 1 
\>xi',»!r, " — ** — r ^ rSfiU To use [hese serxices, dial tlic .NfivT Access Numlier of the country > ou're in and you'll get all the 

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If you don't have an AIXT Gilling Card or you'd like more information on .KRcT global services, just call us using die 
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AT&T 




fKIKT Access Numbers. 

How lo cal! around ihc world 

1 V*wy trie l tun l».+is\ IiikI ihcomniry yi.xi tire c-.tllinn I'roriL 

2 T. , i:«l tin? o iir.-.p. ir,.. iinu AJ;^ Vu.yyi Number. 

3 AJI VTc.T rria Ml ->pr.i ki n- Opcnu. ♦ . -r vomt protnp will ask for the phone number vou wish to call ot cormea vou to a 

CUM- ■rii-.-r «en1«.c repm^nuil'v. ■ 

To receive > our free wallet card of .Ws Access Numbers, past dial the access number of 
ihccounirj - jou’rc in and ask for Customer Service. 


COUNTRY 

Australia 

China, PRC*** 
Guam 
Hong Kong 
India* 
Indonesia* 

J.ljXlll’ 

Korea 

Korea** 

Malaysia* 

: Zi-.ilaiul 

Philippines- 
Saipa n’ 

l.inka 

Taiwan* 

TluiUnd* 


A CCESS NUMBER 

ASIA 

1-800-881 -01 1 

10811 

’ 0I8-8T2 

800-1111 

000-1 IT 

00 1-801-10 

-t“- J 1 1 


.Armenia** 

Austria — 

Belgium* 

Kulilirui 

C roatia' * 

Czech Rep 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Greece 1 * 

Hungary* 

Ireland 


009-11 

nj 

800-0011 

il-i 'i-Ot I 

105-11 

^ 2 55-2872 

-4 * 14 I iTl - I | | 



0080-10288-0 

mil'i-'F/J-mi 
EU ROPE ~ 

' gAUljj 

022 - 905-011 

08 00-100-10 

ijn.lsiaM'il{«i 

99-38 -OQll 

0 Q-a 20 - 0 bl 01 

8001-0010 

9800-100-10 

~ 19* - 0U11 

■' 0130-0010 

00-800-ljll 

0 o*- 800 - 0 llll 

;*w-0ru 

1-800- 5504)00 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 
Ita Iy* 172-10J1 

Liechtenstein* 155-00-13 

Lithuania* 8 a196 

l.uv.-ml'uurs »80i3-Ol 1 1 

Macedon ia, F.YJL of 99-800-4288 

Vakf J OgOnjftiM 10 

■Monaco* ~ 19*-wT T 

Nctheriand? 06 - 022-9111 

Norway 800-19Q-H 

Poland**** 0 * 010 - 180-0 111 

Portugal- 05017-T288 

Romania 01-8QO4>88 

Russia” (Moscow) 155-50^2 

sioralua 004200 0101 

Spjjrro 

S weden’ 020 - 79 ^ 611 ' 

Switzerland* 155-00-11 

lFK ~ 0500-89-0 011 

Ukrainc ' . BaIOO-U 

middle EAST 

gjMJOJ 

080-9061(1 

177-100-2727 

8U0-288 

LBetrm) 426-801 

0800-U1 1-77 

,X J1 l-8m>m 

. 00-800-12277 

800-121 


ruhraio 

i-yprns* " ' 

Israel 

Kuwoii ~~ 

Lebanon (B eirut ) 
Qatar 

Saudi Arabia 
Turkey* 

L Ali.* 


COUNTRY ACq 

Brazil 

Chile 

Columbia " 

Costa Rica*« 

Ecuador* ~ 

El .Salvadnr*a 
Guaiennb* 

Guyana*** 

Honduras'* 

Mexi..ojfc** 9 

Nicaragna (Managua) 
Paaimja 
Pern* " ~ 
Suriname 

Uruguay ~ 

Venezuela** 


ACCESS NUMBER 

000-8010 

QQa-0512 

980-11-0010 

114 

119 

190 

i^i 

165 

125 

95-800-4(32-1 2-tti 

‘agna) 17* 

109 

_ 191 

156 

00-0410 

»M)1 1-J20 


CARIBBEAN 

Bahamas 1-800-872-2881 


Bermuda* 1-8G&4T2-2W1 

British V.l. l-80Q-g-2-2&81 

Cayman Islands 
Grenada* 

901-800^72-2883 
Jitmaica** 0-800^7 3. ^hri 

Neth. Amfl~ 001 *800 -872-21181 
Sc Kins. Neils 14«'it:i-872.28Sl 

AFRICA 

Egy pt* (Cairo) 5104)200 

~oor^ 

15m 

^ ===== ^ 

South AMca ~ TS5 


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11 -m Iiuks- » /r«n lh+4- 


AMERICAS 

Argentina* oni-M\V*tCi-m I 

lkjllV|J ‘ ~ 0-3QU-III2 


510-0200 

QOa-OOI 

00111 

0900-10 

79T-797 

°^°0-994n23 




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